You are here: Course Descriptions

INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-320 Topics in Global Economy Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Global Economy (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics including global political economy, international monetary and financial relations, and international trade and investment relations. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-220.

SISU-320-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: International Trade Relations
International Trade Relations (3) This course considers the main analytical frameworks of trade theory to examine the causes and effects of the various modes of economic globalization: trade, foreign direct investment, and migration. Students then use these frameworks to evaluate current and perennial policy questions on topics such as the working of the world trading system, regional versus multi-lateral integration, and trade and the environment.
SISU-320-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Sustainable Economic Devel
Sustainable Economic Development (3) There is an increasing recognition that economic development and environmental conservation are not conflicting forces but can be mutually reinforcing. The primary objective of sustainable economic development is to provide lasting and secure livelihoods that minimize resource depletion, environmental degradation, cultural disruption, and social instability. This course explores the economic tools available to promote sustainable economic development, including cost-benefit analysis, resource accounting, as well as sectoral and macroeconomic policies.
SISU-320-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: International Money & Finance
International Money and Finance (3) Over the last few decades, financial markets have become increasingly integrated. This has the potential to magnify the effect of economic shocks. National monetary and financial policies therefore have important international implications, as does the structure of the international system. This course addresses contemporary and historical issues in international financial relations. Emphasizing key political and economic concepts, it examines international financial crises, the evolution of the international monetary system, and the merits of alternative exchange rate policies. It also analyses some of the new developments challenging the old order, including cryptocurrencies, high frequency trading, the carry trade, vulture funds, and much more.
SISU-320-002
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: International Economic Policy
International Economic Policy (3) The United States is an increasingly globalized economy, integrated with other countries through international trade in goods and services, through direct foreign investment, and through labor migration. This course discusses the implications of globalization for the United States and the world economy, touching on topics that surface in the news daily, such as the impact of globalization on income, poverty, inequality, the environment, child labor, and conflict. Other topics include the impact of offshoring on blue-collar and white-collar jobs and multinational corporate social responsibility. Finally, the course addresses the role of international labor migration on both the source and destination countries and the potential for brain drain and brain gain.
SISU-320-003
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: International Economic Policy
International Economic Policy (3) The United States is an increasingly globalized economy, integrated with other countries through international trade in goods and services, through direct foreign investment, and through labor migration. This course discusses the implications of globalization for the United States and the world economy, touching on topics that surface in the news daily, such as the impact of globalization on income, poverty, inequality, the environment, child labor, and conflict. Other topics include the impact of offshoring on blue-collar and white-collar jobs and multinational corporate social responsibility. Finally, the course addresses the role of international labor migration on both the source and destination countries and the potential for brain drain and brain gain.