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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-330 Topics in Natl Sec/Foreign Pol Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics including U.S. defense politics, transnational security challenges, national security and proliferation, and critical global challenges. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-230.

SISU-330-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: U.S. Nat'l Security Strategy
U.S. National Security Strategy (3) This course focuses on how the United States formulates national security strategy; what challenges presidents face in the development and implementation of national security strategy; what grand strategies America has pursued and whether any of them are applicable to today's world; and how the United States should deal with various contemporary security challenges.
SISU-330-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: U.S.-Israel Relations
U.S.-Israel Relations (3) This course explores the evolution of U.S. relations with Israel, from the establishment of the Jewish state in 1948 to the present day. Along the way, it examines key milestones in U.S.-Israel relations, beginning with President Truman's controversial decision to buck the U.S. foreign policy establishment and formally recognize the state of Israel; the wartime American airlift in 1973; the U.S. role in Arab-Israeli peacemaking, from Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy to the two Camp David summits and beyond; and the U.S. role in providing military, economic, and diplomatic aid to the Jewish state. The course analyzes how a combination of sentimental, political, and strategic factors have led to the formation of a wholly unique bilateral relationship characterized at once by both tight bonds and inherent tensions.
SISU-330-003
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Media/Foreign Pol in Trump Era
Instructional Method: Online. Media and Foreign Policy in the Trump Era (3) The twenty-first century is simultaneously characterized by disruptive changes in new media and digital information technologies as well as disruptive shifts in foreign policies of nation states in an increasingly unstable international system. This course looks at the role social media and news media play in influencing new directions in foreign policy, particularly in the Trump era, which itself carries disruption. The course examines rapid transformations in the way the media cover and report the world since the election of President Trump, the explosive effects in the digital sphere, and their combined interactions with the shaping and design of evolving forms of engagement and disengagement in foreign policy.
SISU-330-004
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Crises in U.S. Foreign Policy
Crises in U.S. Foreign Policy (3) Students learn about the evolution of U.S. foreign policy by analyzing crises that have confronted U.S. policymakers throughout the country's history. The course examines debates about declaring war, responding to nuclear threats, and weathering constitutional crises. Students engage with a range of primary sources drafted by U.S. officials in the midst of crises, as well as retrospective accounts by participants and scholars. Through the course, they gain a deeper understanding of the most significant challenges that have faced the United States in its foreign relations.
SISU-330-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Israel's National Security
Israel's National Security: Challenges and Strategies (3) Israel's national security is based on the interdependence between defense, political, and economic factors, with the military, intelligence, and diplomacy playing a critical role in safeguarding it. As the world witnesses a realignment of the great powers and the Middle East is dramatically changing, Israel faces great challenges and Israel's national security will depend on its ability to adapt to the new realities. This course reviews the history and evolution of Israeli national security, examines principles and roles of institutions in war and peace, analyzes challenges facing Israel including the rise of radical Islam, the growth of cyber warfare, and higher sophistication of terrorist organizations, and how it deals with them.
SISU-330-002
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Negotiating Global Challenges
Negotiating Global Challenges (3) The twenty-first century presents daunting challenges to U.S. foreign, policy. Instability looms large and it is clear that the future U.S. role as a global leader is anything but assured. This course addresses the critical questions of how the United States has confronted serious policy challenges in the past and what U.S. policymakers need to do in the coming years to preserve American power, further U.S. interests, and enhance global stability. Students draft policy memos, conduct debates, and partake in simulations focused on the issues of paramount concern to U.S. foreign policy makers.
SISU-330-003
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Domestic Sources of USFP
Domestic Sources of United States Foreign Policy (3) This course focuses on the societal forces of United States foreign policy including the media, interest groups, and public opinion. The course considers the extent to which leaders can shape public opinion and the extent to which their actions are constrained by domestic politics.
SISU-330-004
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Diplomatic Practice
Diplomatic Practice (3) This seminar studies diplomacy in theory, history, and practice, as a political process and as an instrument of foreign policy. It covers diplomats' relations with their own governments as well as the countries in which they serve; how they use information on the politics, economics, and society of their host nation; the origin and costs of mistakes; and the future of diplomacy in an era of globalization and instant communication. It seeks to illustrate approaches to diplomacy through historical examples and contemporary case studies, linking diplomatic practice to current events.
SISU-330-005
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Comparative Foreign Policy
Comparative Foreign Policy (3) This course studies foreign governments and their foreign policy behavior. By looking at domestic politics as the driver of a state's foreign policy, this field provides an alternative to traditional international relations (IR) theory. This course introduces students to the field's core concepts and surveys the foreign policies of great and mid-level powers. Students complete their own research projects on a country of their choosing.
SISU-330-007
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Intelligence & Nat'l Security
Intelligence and National Security (3) The United States invests a great deal of money and manpower on intelligence, but not everyone is satisfied with the return on investment. In response to alleged intelligence failures before and after 9/11, Congress ordered a sweeping reorganization of the intelligence community, culminating in the most substantial changes since World War II. Meanwhile, scholars went back to basic questions, including the relationship between intelligence and national security; how does intelligence influence foreign policy and strategic decisions; why does it succeed or fail; and is it possible to conduct secret intelligence in a way that is consistent with the values of government transparency, public accountability, and individual freedom. This seminar provides an overview of the theory and practice of U.S. intelligence. It details the sources and methods used by collectors, the nature of intelligence analysis, and the relationship between intelligence agencies and policymakers. It also contains a short history of the U.S. intelligence community and evaluates the ongoing efforts to reform it. Finally, it discusses the uneasy role of secret intelligence in a modern democracy.
SISU-330-008
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Cyber Sec/Conflt in Int'l Rel
Cyber Security and Conflict in International Relations (3) This course introduces students to the history, issues, policies, and future of cyber security as it relates to international conflict and relations among nations. The course covers developments in cyberspace as they relate to espionage, terrorism, cyber warfare, and cyber crime. Students also obtain an understanding of cyberspace law and governance and an introduction to the technical aspects of cyber security, including issues of privacy, surveillance, and social media.