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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-330
Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including U.S. defense politics, transnational security challenges, national security and proliferation, and critical global challenges. May be taken A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-230.

SISU-330
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

Negotiating Global Challenges

The twenty-first century presents daunting challenges to U.S. foreign policy. Instability looms large and it is clear that the future U.S. role as a global leader is anything but assured. This course addresses the critical questions of how the United States has confronted serious policy challenges in the past and what U.S. policymakers need to do in the coming years to preserve American power, further U.S. interests, and enhance global stability. Students draft policy memos, conduct debates, and partake in simulations focused on the issues of paramount concern to U.S. foreign policy makers.

SISU-330
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

Israeli Foreign Policy 1948-2015

Israeli foreign policy is at a crossroads as the world is witnessing a realignment of the great powers (United States, China, and Russia) while the political landscape of the Middle East is rapidly changing. Israeli foreign policy needs to adapt to the new global and regional realities as it faces its strategic challenges. This course reviews the history and evolution of Israel's foreign policy, examines the principles that have governed it in times of war and times of peace, and analyzes challenges facing Israel globally, regionally, and bilaterally. The course analyzes major trends and developments in Israel's relations with not only its neighbors, but the European Union, Eastern Mediterranean nations, the United Nations, Russia and the former Soviet Bloc, East Asia with an emphasis on China and India, Africa, and Latin America, and how Israeli diplomacy copes with changes in an effort to advance Israel's strategic goals.

SISU-330
003
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

Transnational Security Challenges

The seminar employs a case-study approach to explore key transnational security challenges, such as terrorism (Al-Qaeda); insurgencies (South Asia, Afghanistan-Pakistan border region); nuclear proliferation (Iran); forced migration (Iraqi refugees and IDPs crisis); crime and illicit financial flows (narco-trafficking, Western Hemisphere); resource competition, energy security, and the environment (China); and global infectious diseases (HIV/AIDS, Sub-Saharan Africa). The class examines the relevance of these problems to the security of states and individuals, evaluates the debates regarding the inclusion of these issues in a security framework, and assesses how states, non-state actors, and the international community cope with them.

SISU-330
004
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. National Security Strategy

This course focuses on how the United States formulates national security strategy; what challenges presidents face in the development and implementation of national security strategy; what grand strategies America has pursued and whether any of them are applicable to today's world; and how the United States should deal with various contemporary security challenges.

SISU-330
005
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

Northeast Asia Regional Dynamics

This course examines the security, political, and economic issues involving the major and middle powers in Northeast Asia: China, Japan and the two Koreas. Readings for the course focus on the current policy debates as well the conceptual/theoretical issues that inform these debates, including the resiliency of alliances in the post-Cold War and global terrorism environments; economic growth and energy/resource needs; national memory and historical animosities; democratization and modernization; multilateralism and the role of the United States in this globally critical region.

SISU-330
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. National Security Strategy

This course focuses on how the United States formulates national security strategy; what challenges presidents face in the development and implementation of national security strategy; what grand strategies America has pursued and whether any of them are applicable to today's world; and how the United States should deal with various contemporary security challenges.

SISU-330
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in National Security and Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. -Israel Relations

This course explores the evolution of U.S. relations with Israel, from the establishment of the Jewish state in 1948 to the present day. Along the way, it examines key milestones in U.S.-Israel relations, beginning with President Truman's controversial decision to buck the U.S. foreign policy establishment and formally recognize the state of Israel; the wartime American airlift in 1973; the U.S. role in Arab-Israeli peacemaking, from Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy to the two Camp David summits and beyond; and the U.S. role in providing military, economic, and diplomatic aid to the Jewish state. The course analyzes how a combination of sentimental, political, and strategic factors have led to the formation of a wholly unique bilateral relationship characterized at once by both tight bonds and inherent tensions.