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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-350
Topics in Environmental Sustainability and Global Health (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including human geography, politics of population, international environmental politics, health in the developing world, and health communication. May be taken A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-250.

SISU-350
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Environmental Sustainability and Global Health (3)

Sustainable Cities

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. The course explores what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. The class considers how to measure sustainability and discusses the effectiveness of sustainability indicator and examines governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. The transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future is also highlighted.

SISU-350
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Environmental Sustainability and Global Health (3)

Political Ecology of Food and Agriculture

This course examines political, cultural, and technological connections to environment and development. It provides students with an introduction to political ecology and its approach to global food studies. Students use political ecology and social theory paradigms to examine industrial and alternative food networks, including their impacts on the environment, communities, and rural development. Students also examine how food policy and the global food trading system shape these networks and local environments, communities, and development practices.

SISU-350
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Environmental Sustainability and Global Health (3)

International Environmental Politics

Global environmental dangers are among the most profound challenges facing humanity. They currently undermine the quality of life for many and threaten, in the extreme, to compromise the fundamental, organic infrastructure that supports all life on earth. This course introduces students to the socio-political dynamics of global environmental affairs. Furthermore, it examines a number of key environmental issues including species extinction, food and agriculture, and climate change. Students gain familiarity with the role power plays in the emergence of environmental problems and how power in turn can be wielded in the service of sustainability.

SISU-350
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Environmental Sustainability and Global Health (3)

Nature and Environmental Ethics

This course examines questions such as: how have human beings understood nature throughout history, how have major shifts in understanding been accomplished, ought our role on earth to be one of observation, stewardship, holistic integration, dominion, technological conquest, or something else altogether. This course considers humankind's shifting understanding of nature as it is reflected in primary philosophical texts and contemporary writings on environmental ethics. During the second half of the course students have the opportunity to take up a research project concerning a historical period, region of the world, or contemporary environmental issue that is of special interest to them.