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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-379 Topics Human Rgts/Iden/Culture Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Human Rights, Identity, and Culture (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics focusing on the intersection of human rights, identity, and culture. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-260 or SISU-270.

SISU-379-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Civil Rgts/Other Soc Movements
Course Type: Community Based Learning. As a part of this course, students will actively serve with a nonprofit agency or school in the DC area to apply their course knowledge. Civil Rights and Other Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (3) This course looks at the history of civil rights and other social movements that have fought for equal rights and democratic rule, including those organized by students, LGBTQ activists, anti-colonial and holocaust resistance fighters, labor union and community organizers, and poor people in a wide variety of countries. The course also looks at the evolution of thinking about social movements as theorists grapple with the challenge posed by movements that defy their predictions.
SISU-379-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Human Rights and the Media
Human Rights and the Media (3) This course examines how various means of mass communication--print and broadcast news media; speeches; social media; and documentary films--affect the realization of human rights. All forms of media participate in the construction of human rights narratives, thus influencing the debate surrounding specific human rights issues. Students learn methods of media research and analysis, and use such methods to complete a study of media coverage of a human rights issue of their choice. Students also create their own media.
SISU-379-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Pol of Policing/Incarcert/Race
The Politics of Policing, Incarceration, and Race in the United States and Europe (3) This course looks at the dynamic interaction of race, policing, and criminal justice in Europe and the United States. In particular, it looks at the construction of national, racial, ethnic, and religious boundaries, and the impact of these boundaries on police, penal institutions, and targeted groups in the United States and Europe. The course focuses on the way in which racial fears and political opportunism have shaped criminal justice policies in the United States and Europe.