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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-380 Topics in Global & Comp Govern Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Global and Comparative Governance (3) Topics vary by section. Rotating topics including international law, comparative governing institutions, and leading global organizations. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206 and SISU-280.

SISU-380-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Democracy & Authoritarianism
Democracy and Authoritarianism in Comparative Perspective (3) This course examines the dynamics of political regime origins and change in modern Latin America, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Asia. Specifically, it studies the causes underlying democratization and its demise, as well as the factors that explain the origins and breakdown of contemporary authoritarian regimes. The course compares a variety of different theoretical approaches in an effort to explain both political processes of continuity and change and important differences that exist across world regions and countries.
SISU-380-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Empire and Imperialism
Empire and Imperialism (3) A great deal of human history is the history of empires. This course considers empire as an ever-lasting and overarching form of governance and as an important lens for understanding contemporary global powers. It discusses how historic empires, e.g., Rome, China, Britain, and Japan, deployed military forces, built ideological hegemony, exerted indirect rule, and governed heterogeneous peoples. Special attention is given to European imperialism that created and shaped the modern world. The ongoing imperial practices of the United States, Russia, and China are examined in comparison to their precedents, counterparts, and competitors.
SISU-380-001
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Pol of Intl Criminal Courts
Politics of International Criminal Courts (3) Civilians have comprised half of all war-related deaths over the past three centuries. In the twentieth century, when civilian war casualties are combined with those targeted by their own governments, the number rises to nearly 360 million people. For those who experience or witness atrocities, shock and grief are often followed by an urgent cry for justice, a primal anguish born of human tragedy. During what some have called "the century of genocide," the global hue and cry for justice continued to grow. A growing global movement for justice gave rise to significant growth in international criminal law. This course explores the politics of international criminal law by examining the emergence of international courts, the factors that shaped their formation, the politics of their design, and their impact on international society. These elements are examined in depth through a study of international criminal courts, including the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals, the ICTY and ICTR, hybrid tribunals, and the International Criminal Court.
SISU-380-002
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Nationalism, Race and Identity
Nationalism, Race and Identity (3) This course examines the sources and consequences of the most powerful political loyalties and attachments: the bonds of peoplehood, which have motivated both war and political violence as well as empathy and sacrifice for strangers. After examining the origins of these attachments, the course seeks to use our understanding of these bonds to explain patterns of ethnic cleansing, genocide, and war, voting behavior, and secession and state formation.
SISU-380-003
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: International Organizations
International Organizations (3) International organizations (IOs) are important but flawed actors in global and regional governance as they attempt to solve or avert important problems that do not respect national borders. This course examines the origins, roles, and performance of IOs in areas that include economic development, international security, trade, and humanitarian assistance.
SISU-380-004
Term: Spring 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Pol/Soc Challenges in Latin Am
Political and Social Challenges in Latin America (3) This course provides an overview of the major contemporary themes debated in the Latin American politics scholarly literature. Students gain substantial theoretical and empirical knowledge on the region's models of economic development, political institutions, welfare regimes, indigenous movements, political parties, and social actors, among others. Students study both broad trends and cross-country diversity through the study of select cases, including Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela, among others. In addition, they become familiar with the major analytical debates and approaches to the study of Latin American politics and society. The seminar provides students with empirical, theoretical, and analytic tools to critically assess the unfolding of past, current, and future economic, social, and political events in Latin America.