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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-397 SIS Honors Colloquium Course Level: Undergraduate

SIS Honors Colloquium (3) Topics vary by section. This seminar for SIS Honors students stands at the intersection of three or more SIS undergraduate thematic areas. It challenges students intellectually and encourages them to think deeply about their Honors projects. Usually Offered: fall and spring. Repeatable for credit with different topic. Grading: A-F only. Prerequisite: SISU-206.

SISU-397-001
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: The Responsibility to Protect
The Responsibility to Protect (3) The course explores the relatively new international concept of the responsibility to protect. Students examine a series of historical and contemporary examples where the international community failed in this responsibility: the Holocaust, India/Pakistan independence, Rwanda, the Balkans, and Syria, as well as places where the doctrine has been asserted with mixed results: Kosovo, Libya, and Iraq. The course explores the moral, legal, and practical issues involved and challenges students to understand the ambiguities and competing national priorities that make implementation and enforcement possible or likely. Restriction: SIS Honors Program.
SISU-397-002
Term: Fall 2018 Regular Term
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Civilizations and World Orders
Civilizations and World Orders: The Making of Global International Relations (3) The conventional study of international relations relies heavily on concepts and institutions developed in the West. This course offers an alternative perspective by bringing in the contribution of different civilizations, including Near Eastern, Greco-Roman, Indian, Chinese, and Islamic, as well as modern Europe, to the making of international relations. It takes a broad sweep of historical developments, such as interactions among classical civilizations leading to the rise of the West, the impact of colonialism and decolonization, the role of postcolonial states in developing global norms and institutions, and the myths and realities behind the notion of a "clash of civilizations." This leads to a new global perspective on international relations, or a global international relations that helps students better understand conflict, peace, and interdependence in our increasingly complex, multicultural world. Restriction: SIS Honors Program.
SISU-397-001
Term: Spring 2019 Semester
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Exploring Impact of New Tech
Exploring the Impact of New Technologies (3) This seminar explores the ethical, strategic, and practical implications about new and emerging technologies. It surveys a broad range of new phenomena, including social media, unmanned aircraft system (UAS or drones), additive manufacturing (3-D printing), smart devices, the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, semi-autonomous systems, and, most importantly, the prospect of full artificial intelligence. Many new technologies hold great promise for enhancing human security, for example, by enabling faster global information flow about pandemics or weather events, reducing traffic deaths through self-driving cars, or employing drones in situations that are dangerous to humans (as in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster). But each of these wonderful new developments carries a parallel downside: a faster information flow offered the so-called Islamic State a means to recruit members, self-driving cars have been hacked and driven into walls, and armed drones have facilitated remote killing of American citizens. In addition, there is clear evidence that social media enabled Russia to hack into U.S. and European democratic elections. Students investigate how can we navigate wide-ranging technological disruption and build a positive future. Restriction: SIS Honors Program