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INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-419
Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section. Rotating senior capstone topics focusing on international studies. May be taken A-F only. Prerequisite: International Studies major and at least 75 credits.

SISU-419
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Ethnic Cleansing and Genocide in Comparative Perspective

Designed as a comparative and interdisciplinary inquiry, this course looks at the ways historical context, political realities, and cultural components enable ethnic cleansing and genocide to happen. Cases studied include the Herero genocide, the Armenian genocide, the Rape of Nanking Massacre, the Holocaust, the Cambodian genocide, the Rwandan genocide, ethnic cleansing and genocide in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the Sudan genocide.

SISU-419
005
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Environment, Conflict, and Peace

Students examine the theoretical linkages and political mechanisms at play between the environment, natural resources, and the causes, dynamics, and effects of conflict and peace. Key questions explored include, does environmental degradation lead to violent conflict; is resource scarcity or resource abundance a risk factor for violence; what are the environmental consequences of war; and whether addressing environmental problems can be used as a peace-building tool. Structured as a seminar, students participate dynamically by making presentations, working in groups, etc.

SISU-419
006
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Voices of Terror

This course investigates the causes and consequences of terrorism. Students read, discuss, hear, and watch first person accounts of participation in terrorism. The course examines prominent contemporary and historical terror campaigns through the lens of the people directly involved. Most courses on terrorism examine secondary sources or information that is filtered by other people/sources. This course is unique as it asks students to evaluate violent actions and goals through the participants' own words. The course incorporates insights from psychology, political science, economics, history, and other disciplines. The course examines questions related to the reliability of sources, moral issues, and how these works fit into larger themes in their particular historical periods.

SISU-419
007
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Detente: An International History

Detente was a significant period within the Cold War, marked by a prolonged absence of outright hostility or military tension between the United States and the Soviet Union. After two decades of brinksmanship ending with the Cuban Missile Crisis, detente appeared to be a period of apparent peace. Successive summits, arms control agreements, and cultural exchanges created the impression that tension between the two superpowers had finally dissipated. Examining the meaning of detente in a more international context, however, reveals a pattern of continued competition. Students enrolled in this course analyze the complex international relations of the detente period. This course attempts to define detente and evaluate its policy implications. Students study the origins of detente and its evolution over time and in different international contexts. The course begins examining early efforts in the late 1960s, continue through the successes of the Nixon administration and the challenges faced by Presidents Ford and Carter, and finish with the advent of the "new Cold War" in the first years of Reagan's presidency. The course compares key events in the Cold War, exploring different manifestations of detente across geographic boundaries. The objectives of this course are to promote critical, analytical thinking about a significant period in Cold War history and to encourage students to think in an international context to develop their own interpretation of the evolution and significance of detente.

SISU-419
008
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Seen and Not Heard: Children in International Affairs

This course examines the place of children in international affairs. Though they rarely have a voice of their own, they are caught up in a range of international and transnational phenomena. The course investigates how the notion of childhood is being radically re-shaped, in part as a consequence of globalization. Students take up various case studies including child soldiers, immigrant children in U.S. Immigration custody, children born of wartime rape, transnational adoption, links between education and violent extremism, and others. Guest speakers talk about their work with children around the world.

SISU-419
009
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Alternatives to Violence

Against the many forms of violence: military violence, economicviolence, domestic violence, verbal violence, sexual violence, racial violence, governmental violence, alternatives do exist. The purpose of this course is to examine them: when, where, and why they work. The course is discussion-based, with all viewpoints welcomed.

SISU-419
010
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Warriors after War

One of the eternal challenges of war and peace is what happens to the combatants once their part of the war is over. This course explores questions such as whether they are a talent pool ready to build post-war prosperity or a disadvantaged group in need of social services and legal protection, and should assistance be focused on veterans, or the families and communities they rejoin, from both participant and policymaker perspectives. It also covers a range of contexts, from disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programs in countries emerging from civil war to the treatment of veterans and families as professional armies return from overseas conflicts. Students are invited to build upon their existing areas of specialization or to explore new countries, regions, or aspects of the subject.

SISU-419
011
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Rise of China and the Global Economy

Over the past two decades, China has experienced a dramatic economic transition and extremely rapid growth, lifting nearly half a billion of its people out of poverty. At the same time, this ongoing transformation has had a far-reaching impact on the rest of Asia and the world. This course provides an overview of China's economic reforms as well as their impact on regional and global growth, employment, income distribution and inflation, the battle for natural resources, the structure of world trade and capital flows, and the process of global economic policy-making. With this as background, students undertake guided research, examining key challenges facing China going forward and tracing out potential implications for the global economy.

SISU-419
012
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

From Agriculture to Agribusiness: The Political Economy of Food in aGlobalizing World

Agriculture as a sector is unparalleled in its importance to the economy and society. While human societies have existed without agriculture, it is only with agriculture that we get complex divisions of labor, industry, commerce, and extensive cultural production. Because of its central importance to social stability and economic well-being, governments from the time of the Pharaohs have sought to control, promote and manipulate agricultural development in myriad ways. This course examines how agricultural development interacts with public policy, economic, and environmental change. Key themes explored include the role of the state in promoting certain agricultural models, international trade policy and agriculture, the relationship between agricultural development and industrialization, and the emergence of new agricultural paradigms in response to the failures of industrial agriculture. Case studies exploring these themes are drawn from across the world.

SISU-419
013
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

The Evolution of European International Society

The modern worldwide system of sovereign states began as a European international society that spread across the world and eventually supplanted all alternatives. In this class students study the evolution and expansion of this system and the consequences it has had for world history and contemporary politics. The class studies what European politics looked like before sovereign states dominated, how sovereignty came into being, how European international society differed from and interacted with the international societies of other regions, and how it is evolving today.

SISU-419
014
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Intelligence and National Security Decisionmaking

While examining historic and contemporary issues in U.S. national security and foreign policy, this course explores the nexus of analyst-policymaker interaction, challenges to sound decisionmaking, and the art of transforming research methods, research designs, and academic-style writing into executive-style outputs. Students prepare written analyses employing the bottom line up front technique as well as verbally present and defend their work. Students also work in teams, mimicking the day-to-day collaboration that exists in today's workplace. Students identify a topic of current interest and focus deeply on it while keeping abreast of general developments in U.S. national security and foreign policy. The analytic work is estimative--students explore the likelihood of future developments and implications for the United States. Students also peer review each other's work along the way, offering constructive comments for consideration.

SISU-419
015
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Critical Approaches to International Relations

This course challenges students to think about international relations issues from a critical theoretical point of view. Topics covered include issues such as the war on terror, identity politics and border politics, as well as critical approaches like critical theory, poststructuralism and postcolonialism. The aim of these perspectives is to destabilize taken-for-granted ideas and views in order to cultivate alternative thinking and practice. The course is structured as a discussion oriented seminar, and students are expected to make presentations, do group works, etc.

SISU-419
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Jihadists and the State

The Authorization to Use Military Force passed after 9/11 was the first ever directed at organizations and persons rather than nation-states. Since then, much of the literature about jihadists groups has focused on their non-state nature. Yet most aspects of U.S. efforts to degrade and defeat jihadist groups require working with partner nations. Moreover, comprehending and countering jihadist groups necessitates understanding their relationships with the countries from which they emanate and in which they dwell. The actions of a local state and a jihadist organization's relationship with it significantly influence that organization's evolution. Institutional arrangements coupled with political, cultural, social, and economic factors in a jihadist group's environment create opportunities and constraints. In turn, these local factors influence a jihadist organization's ideology, objectives, strategic approach, organizational structure, capabilities, decision-making and behavior. This course explores jihadist-state dynamics, specifically the affect on jihadist ideology, alliance formation, strategic planning, organization, and nascent attempts at state building. Throughout the course, students also assess how these dynamics specifically and local partners in general affect U.S. efforts to defeat, degrade, or contain jihadist groups throughout the world.

SISU-419
003
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Sustainable Urban Development

This course offers an opportunity for a supervised practical application of concurrently studied theory. Using a real-world collaborative project as the springboard and destination, the course considers the means, methods, and components of sustainable and adaptive cities; understands the barriers to urban sustainability; and devises and applies an integrated, globally-replicable, triple-bottom line (economically beneficial, socially equitable, and environmentally healthy) approach to a local urban context.

SISU-419
004
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

The Honeybee and International Relations

What does the humble honeybee tell us, behind its buzz? This course focuses on honeybees as both a metaphorical and pragmatic example through which to view broader international relations issues such as sustainable development, commodities and the global economy, labor and migration, and democratic processes. Throughout the course, students will develop their own significant research projects, based on a singular micro-level case study which explores and explains an international relations issue. The course is based on political and cultural geographic traditions which use a granular focus to examine big-picture issues.

SISU-419
005
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Makers of Strategic Theory

Simply put: strategy matters. Yet, understanding strategy and being able to think strategically are not so simple. This course examines the social, moral, military, and economic dimensions of war and peace by exploring both the content and historical context of some of history's greatest strategic thinkers. Warfare and statecraft have changed over the years, but the classics of strategic thought endure. The best way to develop analytical ability is to study the great masters of strategy and to test these theories across a range of historical and contemporary cases. For example, students discuss the following questions: what can Thucydides teach us about the nature of the US/Chinese strategic rivalry, what does Machiavelli have to say about civil-military relations, and how does Clausewitz recommend one balance the delicate tension between political and military objectives. By the end of this course, students have the confidence to participate in many complex strategic debates, not only about historical and present conflicts, but those in the future as well.

SISU-419
006
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Transitional Justice

This course considers reconciliation and transitional justice in countries transitioning to democracy. It explores the process of transitional justice in countries with different political histories, including Apartheid, Communism, and dictatorship or authoritarianism. By examining and comparing these cases, students gain a better understanding of the complex political, economic, social, psychological, and moral issues that countries are grappling with in their efforts to come to terms with the past. This is a writing intensive course.

SISU-419
007
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Politics of US Foreign Policy

This course examines various dimensions of the domestic politics of U.S. foreign policy, including the roles of Congress and the President, public opinion, interest groups, and partisanship. The course is conducted in a seminar style, with a heavy emphasis on discussion of course readings.

SISU-419
008
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Innovating for Impact

This Seminar cocreates its own curriculum and learning outcomes as they relate to the successful design, implementation, and evaluation of innovations and social change in the context of the following institutions and areas: international organizations; nongovernmental organizations; social enterprises; development arenas and global governance (environment, health, and internet). Particular attention is paid to knowledge transfer and the roles of culture and communication. Each student designs and implements a capstone project or policy analysis.

SISU-419
009
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Foreign Policy Simulation

This course gives students the chance to explore how and why American officials make certain foreign policy decisions by examining the process of American foreign policy-making. It also integrates role-playing simulations, which helps students understand the sort of challenges and dilemmas that policy-makers routinely face.

SISU-419
010
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Empire to Globalization: Critical International Relatio

What should critical international relations (IR) look like, what kinds of questions should it ask, and what kinds of changes does it envisage? These are central questions that are being asked from a number of different perspectives in the field. This course closely examines these issues in the context of hegemony and resistance, with added focus on global capitalism, empire, race, and postcolonialism and emphasis on historical and discourse analysis.

SISU-419
011
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Emerging Economies and World Politics

The course investigates the foreign policies of the largest emerging economies, particularly Brazil, China, and India, and their role in contemporary world politics and global governance. Although the course concentrates on these three emerging economies, students may write final papers on other emerging economies or to compare Brazil, China, or India to another emerging economy.

SISU-419
012
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

The UN and Security Crises

This course focuses on global security threats facing the United States and the international community, and the role of the UN Security Council, NATO, and other multilateral entities in addressing them. Through a series of crisis scenarios and mock Security Council discussions, students explore the interests and objectives of major world powers, and analyze the use of various policy instruments, from negotiations to sanctions to the use of military force. The course draws upon relevant case studies and historical analogies to provide context for current challenges.

SISU-419
013
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Conflict Cuisine

This course explores the history and diplomacy of recent conflicts through the ultimate form of soft power: food. Gastro-diplomacy, conflict prevention, and history converge in this unique course that whets students' intellectual appetites. Classroom readings and discussions plus visits to local eateries in Washington, DC explore how the wars in Viet Nam, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, and El Salvador became local through their cuisines and the Diaspora that produces them.

SISU-419
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Narcotrafficking in Mexico

This course looks at the drug trade in Mexico. Although Mexico has always exported drugs into the United States, the drug trade changed substantially in the 1990s. Drug trafficking groups grew more sophisticated and more violent and kidnapping, extortion, and murder tallies all increased during the 2000s. The course introduces students to this complex trade by tracing the trade and shifts in it through the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The devastating impacts of narcotrafficking and the country's political system, its social and cultural fabric, and its economic organization are also examined.