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WASHINGTON SEMESTER

WSEM-496
Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

WSEM-496
001TL
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

International Development: Novels, Film, and Music

This online course uses a number of non-traditional texts including novels, feature films, and music videos to examine several themes in international development, such as socialist and neoliberal models, gender in development, modernization and globalization, governance, post conflict reconstruction, and the role of a development worker. These themes are not only alive in a classroom setting, but they also impact the real lives of populations from the Global South, who oftentimes record their protest, struggle, and accomplishment in novels, films, and music. Using these works of fiction to study themes in international development gives students a unique perspective into views on development issues from the Global South. Students compare non-traditional texts from the Global South, while analyzing local, national, and international concerns from region to region. The course also uses academic material from international development texts to supplement the works of fiction. Open only to Washington Semester Program students.

WSEM-496
006T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Development Seminar I

The two-part sustainable development seminar provides a comprehensive experiential learning program in which students meet and interact with decision makers, activists, and others who work on issues of social change, development, and environmental sustainability. Students actively participate in their own learning by choosing a semester-long project and engaging in a variety of professional development activities. The class explores linkages between development and environmental concerns while recognizing their complexity at local, national, and global levels. Diverse topics including theories of activism and social change; key players in the global arena; common best practices in the field; and global challenges with a focus upon inequality, consumption, and environmental degradation are also discussed. Open only to Washington Semester Program students.

WSEM-496
001T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Global Business in China

This course offers students the opportunity to study global economics and business practices in China as well as China's key role(s) in the global economy. The course considers issues of policy, leadership, technology, entrepreneurship, business culture, and some of the challenges and opportunities of rapid change. Students travel to the business, political, and cultural centers of Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. Students meet with multinationals operating in China such as Cisco, Honeywell, General Motors, Omron, and with prominent Chinese companies like Shanghai Jahwa, Guosen Securities, Spring Airlines, Yanjing Beer Company. Discussions with China's new entrepreneurs, activists, and policy experts offer firsthand insight into the nation's transformation as China takes its place as a dominant global player, changing existing international, economic, and business relations. Students also have the opportunity to consider history and culture as they visit the Great Wall of China, the Forbidden City, the Summer Palace, and Tiananmen Square. Open only to Washington Semester Program students.

WSEM-496
002T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Peacebuilding and Reconstruction

This class examines challenges to peace- nation- and state building after violent conflict. Through interaction with members of all parties involved in the peace process, from international diplomats to political and religious leaders, as well as many opportunities to engage with local grassroots organizations, students have the chance to gain first hand insights into the politics, emotions, and daily struggles of peacebuilding on the ground. Open only to Washington Semester program students.

WSEM-496
003T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Development and Culture in New Orleans

This course explores a variety of issues facing New Orleans, 10 years after Hurricane Katrina. From cultural vibrancy to severe inequality, New Orleans offers the opportunity to consider many issues of urban development and environmental sustainability. The course considers race, inequality, poverty, gentrification and their connections to history, culture, geography, and tourism. Visits to the lower 9th Ward provides first hand insights into post-hurricane development and challenges. As a key US port city students also have the opportunity to look at roles of food, agriculture, and trade in urban development. Finally students engage with environmental issues including wetland loss, marine fishing practices and conservation efforts, post oil spill recovery efforts, and urban pollution. Open only to Washington Semester program students.

WSEM-496
007T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Development Seminar II

The two-part sustainable development seminar provides a comprehensive experiential learning program in which students meet and interact with decision makers, activists, and others who work on issues of social change, development, and environmental sustainability. Students actively participate in their own learning by choosing a semester-long project and engaging in a variety of professional development activities. The class explores linkages between development and environmental concerns while recognizing their complexity at local, national, and global levels. Diverse topics including theories of activism and social change; key players in the global arena; common best practices in the field; and global challenges with a focus upon inequality, consumption, and environmental degradation are also discussed. Open only to Washington Semester Program students.

WSEM-496
009HB
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Write Well and Get Published

This course examines the fundamentals of journalistic writing in a variety of forms - opinion essays, blogs, news features and memoirs. Students write on topics of their choice, within parameters of the assignments, and also learn the steps of the publishing process. The course allows students to explore artistic expression through language, and how to create compelling visual images while telling audiences fresh fact-based stories. Students develop their writing skills for personal expression as well as workplace contexts. The emphasis is on learning to write with a clear and original voice, a skill that helps students in any profession they choose to pursue.

WSEM-496
011T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

The U.S. Presidency: History and Current Controversies

This course examines the history of the American presidency, along with several controversies that have been top priorities for recent presidents. The course begins by studying the constitutional origins and history of the presidency and steadily works toward a more comprehensive understanding of the office through both "classic" and contemporary works focused on how it has developed over the past two hundred years.