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Showing Results for2019S CORE complex problems

CORE-105
Complex Problems Seminar
CLOSED
001
Visual Identities
03.00
Pearson,A
Books
MTH
08:10AM
09:25AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Visual Identities (3) Drawing on museum collections in Washington, DC, this course explores how visual images constructed, claimed, and sometimes contested identities across the geohistorical spectrum. This course considers how images convey identities tied to cultural conceptions about politics, religions, race, gender, disability, and sexuality, and what such works teach us about visual strategies for conveying identity, past and present. Students analyze images comparatively in a case-study approach across specific cultures. Individual and group projects develop critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills.
WAIT-3
002
Homo Addictus
03.00
Ratekin,T
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Homo Addictus (3) Addiction is an extremely common human experience--an experience that highlights the particular joys and pains of being alive. Addictions to such varied things as alcohol, drugs, the internet, video games, pornography, sex, and shopping address and treat a universal pain that is central to humanity. This course considers how potentially addictive behaviors draw people away from ordinary life. Students read fiction, memoir, and social science texts to examine how addiction relates to other difficulties such as trauma, stress, mental illness, social anxiety, and sexuality.
CANCELLED
003
Why Do We Punish
03.00
Weis,L
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Why Do We Punish (3) This course uses literature, philosophy, and the social sciences to understand the complex phenomenon of punishment. Students examine why parents punish their children, why we punish ourselves, as well as why the state punishes individuals. The course considers whether there are any links between the different forms of punishment and whether there are forms of punishment which cannot be justified both on the individual and the state level.
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004
The Art of Decision Making
03.00
Sicina,R
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
The Art of Decision Making (3) Decision making is one of our most important activities in both our professional and personal lives. In this course, decision-making processes are unpacked and thoroughly analyzed. They are viewed through the lenses of psychology, business, and economics as well as various cultural perspectives to understand their strengths and weaknesses. Students are guided to see patterns and come to understand that there are not "right or wrong" approaches but rather "better or worse" approaches to decision making.
CANCELLED
005
The Art of Decision Making
03.00
Sicina,R
Books
MTH
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
The Art of Decision Making (3) Decision making is one of our most important activities in both our professional and personal lives. In this course, decision-making processes are unpacked and thoroughly analyzed. They are viewed through the lenses of psychology, business, and economics as well as various cultural perspectives to understand their strengths and weaknesses. Students are guided to see patterns and come to understand that there are not "right or wrong" approaches but rather "better or worse" approaches to decision making.
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006
No Child Left Behind, Really?
03.00
DeCuir,A
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
No Child Left Behind, Really? (3) Educators promise that no child will be left behind, but students express that they are subjected to achievement gaps, bullying, testing pressures, trauma, and social inequities that shape unequal experiences in school. This course seeks out the voices of students in elementary and secondary schools to understand how the structures, values, and traditions of school influence their academic achievement. The class questions assertions of educational justice through an intersectional analysis of privilege and marginalization, incorporating gender, race, class, sexual identity, language proficiency, and disability in rural, urban, and suburban settings and then interprets student voices using education research, literature, digital media, news, and personal accounts of school.
CLOSED
007
Depicting the Divine
03.00
Allen,J
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Depicting the Divine (3) Using Washington, DC's rich art museums and centers of contemporary religious practice, this course explores the controversies and orthodoxies surrounding godly representations across geographies, temporalities, and cultures. Drawing on a wide range of sources, from analysis of ancient scriptural texts to engagement with DC community leaders, students investigate arguments for and against representation of the divine, and analyze the visual strategies used by artists constrained by dogmatic limitations. In a globalized society which regularly witnesses terrorist destruction of religious images, depicting the divine is a complex and ancient problem still relevant today. The course examines questions such as what does God look like, is the divine representable, and whether it is morally dangerous to visualize divinity.
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008
Let's Talk About Sex Education
03.00
Twigg,M
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Let's Talk About Sex Education (3) How do we learn about sex? It's a complicated question with unique answers based on our families, friends, schools, and identities. And despite these enduring disputes, U.S. institutions still have no consistent answers even for whether we ought to include sexual education in our curricula, much less what such courses should entail. This course explores these conversations by examining perspectives on sex education from media, history, scholars, and a variety of professionals currently working in the field.
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009
Legally Speaking
03.00
Mass,M
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Legally Speaking (3) Although it might seem that the law provides rules for personal and business conduct that are definitive and clear, the law more often balances complex interests that involve many shades of gray. This course examines a series of legal problems concerning the role of the law in people's personal lives as well as in the economic life of countries as part of a community of nations. Although the course examines these problems through a legal lens, it includes economic, business, political, and international relations perspectives. Students critically read, discuss, argue and write with an objective of questioning their own views and gaining an understanding of alternative perspectives.
CANCELLED
010
Diversity in STEM
03.00
Bentley,A
Books
TF
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Diversity in STEM (3) While 70 percent of white students who pursue a bachelor's degree in a STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) field will earn one, only 49 percent of Hispanic students and 42 percent of African-American students will. This underrepresentation of minorities in STEM is a persistent problem, despite enormous policy and financial attention. In this course students investigate the sources of this underrepresentation. Readings include scholarly and popular articles from diverse disciplines including the sciences, law, and policy. The course enables students to analyze and develop strategies that address underrepresentation and understand why STEM is different from other professions.
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012
The Highs and Lows of Drugs
03.00
Gomez,M
Books
W
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
The Highs and Lows of Drugs (3) Drugs remain a complex problem, despite the investment of billions of dollars and many years into potential solutions. After over 50 years of scientific research, we have extensive knowledge of how drugs work on the brain, but little progress has been made in reducing rates of drug addiction. This course critically analyzes the varying approaches (e.g. scientific, public policy, law enforcement) that have been applied to the drug problem.
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013
The Big Short: Money and Power
03.00
Aufderheide,P
Books
W
02:30PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
The Big Short: Money and Power (3) This course on how the public understood and understand the Great Recession and specifically the financial collapse of 2007-2009 exposes students to different choices in storytelling about major and complex events and to different disciplinary approaches to analyzing and understanding the implications of their impact.
OPEN
014
Economic Globlizatn: Pros/Cons
03.00
Porzecanski,A
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Economic Globalization: Pros and Cons (3) Economic globalization refers to the increasing integration of national economies across the world through intensified cross-border movement of goods, services, technology, and capital. Some view it with trepidation, as a juggernaut of untrammeled capitalism marked by such economic interdependence that countries become even more vulnerable to the destructive impact of market shifts. To others, it is a powerful force for good that opens and modernizes societies, empowering consumers and challenging producers; spurring economic efficiency and thus prosperity; undermining national monopolies and promoting innovation; redistributing capital, skills and know-how from rich to poor countries; and encouraging the adoption of better practices in many fields of endeavor and policy. Students read and debate the work of a variety of authors from different disciplines to understand these opposing views and potential solutions to the economic, financial, and related challenges that have arisen.
CANCELLED
015
Confronting Climate Change
03.00
Alonzo,M
Books
MTH
08:10AM
09:25AM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Confronting Climate Change (3) The issue of climate change is a divisive topic in America, and the demand for action regarding climate is a hotly debated topic in political, economic, and social discussions. However, the effects of climate change are seen worldwide, and dialogue surrounding this issue must take into account perspectives from the global community. Throughout the course, students analyze the impact of climate change on people of developing and industrialized nations and evaluate the influence of potential mitigation strategies on the economic, political, and social structure of cultures from around the world.
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016
Whose Hip Hop Cultures
03.00
Salois,K
Books
MTH
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Whose Hip Hop Cultures (3) Who lays claim to hip hop when its arts and cultures are shared worldwide? This course traces hip hop's movement over forty years from a transnational, Afro-diasporic South Bronx to six continents. To understand its circulation, the course explores the racialization of United States popular music, a history and practice of difference-making that profoundly informs the way hip hop has been and continues to be perceived in the United States. Students visit Washington, DC institutions, conduct research in the residence halls, and learn to make historical, cultural, and musical connections between songs.
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017
Podcasts and Persuasion
03.00
Oakes,K
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Podcasts and Persuasion (3) Any topic or theme you can imagine has a podcast covering it. Podcasts are modern, flexible modes of storytelling. But the sense of shared experience and bond between listener and host means listeners are less likely to challenge the purpose, presented information, and analysis. Through listening and analyzing podcasts, the course explores how podcasts inform and shape our experiences and our understanding of ourselves and others in complex, compelling ways.
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018
The West's Problem of Evil
03.00
Tamashasky,A
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
The West's Problem of Evil (3) Great minds of every generation have struggled to explain why bad things happen to good people, why humans are cruel to one another, and, especially for the followers of the Abrahamic faiths, how a world can have evil in it if it's been created by a god who is all-knowing, all-powerful, and all-good. This course discusses the religious origins of the classic "problem of evil," scientific contributions to the discussion, and the legal ramifications of beliefs about evil. This reading- and discussion-heavy course looks for guidance from texts and films, nonfiction and fiction, such as philosopher Susan Neiman's Evil in Modern Thought, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and writings on neuroscience from David Eagleman, along with visits to sites around Washington, DC such as the Holocaust Museum.
CANCELLED
020
Place and Politics
03.00
Houser,S
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Place and Politics (3) So much of our lives today takes place in the virtual world of the internet that it is easy to forget or ignore the ways in which our physical environment affects our behavior and our self-understanding. This course explores different theories of place and why place matters for politics. The course includes an examination of how architecture and design can create or destroy community, the consequences of residential segregation, the importance of public space and monuments, the relationship between place and civic virtue, and the meaningfulness of boundaries.
CLOSED
021
Reality: Distorted/Augmented?
03.00
Shapiro,A
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Reality: Distorted/Augmented? (3) Questions such as what is reality, how we can know whether our perceptions are accurate representations of the world, and what happens when one person's conception of reality disagrees with another's have been addressed in different ways in nearly every domain of intellectual discourse; however, answers have rarely been more important than now, when our society seems to be confronting a crisis of reality: news sources, governmental administrations, scientists, advertisers, think tanks, and others repeatedly tell stories that differ in their essential facts and those facts' application. This course examines philosophical, literary, and scientific works that confront, comment on, or try to resolve the difference between reality and the perception of reality.
CANCELLED
022
Hist/Memory/Just & Forgetting
03.00
Field,L
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
History, Memory, Justice, and Forgetting (3) This course aims to achieve a deeper understanding of how justice and history are interwoven, to see some of the limits and possibilities of the human condition more clearly, and ultimately, possibly attain a more humane approach to living with one another in the present. Through ancient and contemporary plays, literature, and essays, students consider the relationship between the history of a culture and an individual's personal history, the effect of modern technology on memory, the limits of recollection, and the abundance of history.
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024
Navigating Intimacy
03.00
Krasnow,I
Books
W
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Navigating Intimacy (3) This course offers an intensive exploration of how the current state of navigating intimacy in emerging adults was shaped through the lens of modern history, by exposing students to a selection of materials crossing print, online, and visual media. Through research and classroom discussions, the course journeys through the various cultural movements that led students to where they are today, an unprecedented time of confusion and experimentation with their intimate relationships, including questions as whether to date one-on-one, group date, hook-up on Tinder, have friends with benefits, embrace gender/sexual fluidity, as well as deal with how peer pressure affects all of their choices. The course provides a foundation of increased clarity on the complexity of forming healthy intimate relationships, a problem and challenge that binds us all as humans and has perplexed scholars throughout history.
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025
Judging Atrocity
03.00
Souris,R
Books
W
02:30PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Judging Atrocity (3) Our practices of holding one another responsible for wrongdoing depend on the attribution of moral agency, and the view that, as human beings, we are not simply causes in the world, but authors of our actions. Contemporary psychological research increasingly reveals, however, that human action is largely influenced by situational factors beyond our control. How, if at all, can we reconcile this tension? This course examines this complex problem through the context of atrocity crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, and war crimes. It takes an interdisciplinary look into the situational and dispositional causes of atrocity in an effort to develop sound bases for judgment. Discussions animate deeply-held assumptions about human nature and agency, as well as implicating students' own moral views. Students are encouraged to critically reflect on their own intuitions, identify disagreement among writers, and articulate reasons in defense of their own considered judgments.
OPEN
026
21st Century Silk Road
03.00
Nakshbendi,G
Books
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Twenty-First Century Silk Road (3) How will the revival of the Silk Road via the One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative increase the connectivity between nations and facilitate trade to the benefit of all parties when each country has their own political, cultural and economic systems? This course discusses past, present, and the future evolution of globalized commerce via the Silk Road. With sustainability and stabilization at the forefront of many countries' statecraft planning, the course equips students to think critically and develop their own part in the world ahead through reading materials, weekly current articles, guest speakers, and visits to institutions in Washington, DC.
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027
Who Is DC?
03.00
Stokes,B
Books
MTH
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Who Is DC? (3) Outsiders often miss the vibrant neighborhoods of Washington, DC, which have deep histories and distinctive cultures. Today, DC neighborhoods face intense pressure to change. Through field trips, interviews with residents and local politicians, and picture-based maps, students investigate specific neighborhood identities in the District. The course analyzes trade-offs in local campaigns to make strong places, from "buy local" to tactical urbanism and tenant organizing. The course deepens students' relationship with DC, while building skills to analyze the complexities of neighborhoods for development and justice.
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028
Imagining Europe
03.00
Beers,L
Books
W
02:30PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Imagining Europe (3) This course examines the emergence, expansion, and erosion of support for the European Union over the course of the twentieth century and asks what's next for Europe. Topics for investigation include the relationship between nationalism and Europeanism; support for and suspicion of supranational institutions after the First World War; the Third Reich as a new European empire; the relationship between economic growth and peace; the impact of the Iron Curtain on understandings of European geography; the economic and cultural significance of the Euro; and the role of cultural institutions in establishing European identity. The course combines approaches from anthropology, economics, history, political theory, and political science, and makes use of a wide range of secondary and primary sources to address the question of how European leaders and citizens have imagined their relationship to the European Union.
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029
Neoliberalism and Global Jihad
03.00
Partovi,P
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Neoliberalism and Global Jihad (3) This course investigates the links between the global spread of neoliberal economic policies and novel interpretations of jihad among Muslims since the 1970s. It examines the economic and political crises that shook the post-World War II internationalist world order during the 1970s and set the stage for the rise of neoliberalism, with severe and lasting consequences for the global masses. Much of the course is given over to studying these effects since the 1970s. The class questions ahistorical interpretations of the global jihad as intrinsic to Islam and instead considers this rather unexpected movement of largely disaffected young men and women to be a product and beneficiary of the economic, political, and technological transformations of the past four decades.
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030
Playing with Genes
03.00
Marvar,S
Books
MTH
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Playing with Genes (3) This course explores divisive bioethical issues surrounding our growing ability to analyze and manipulate genes in humans, animals, and plants. Students are introduced to the basics of the human genome, as well as technology such as CRISPR that allows for genetic manipulation and the possibilities that provides in health and understanding genetic disease. Students discuss selected readings, view films, and complete creative writing assignments while exploring the bioethical side of genetic manipulation, gene therapy, cloning, and reproductive technologies such as three parent babies. The class considers personalized medicine and its impact on healthcare, in addition to genetic engineering of animals in the fight against disease (e.g., Zika virus) and genetically modified foods.
CLOSED
031
#BroadwaySoDiverse
03.00
Blustein,N
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
#BroadwaySoDiverse (3) Many scholars have regarded the twenty-first century to be a watershed era for inclusiveness on Broadway. This course examines a chronology of such representation on "The Great White Way," including titles from current and/or past Broadway seasons such as Falsettos and Hamilton. The course offers students the opportunity to watch both live and archived performances of musicals past and present, as well as read, verbally deconstruct, and even perform excerpts from these shows with the goal of practicing rational, respectful, and empathetic difficult dialogues/critical conversations.
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032
The Bacon Terminator
03.00
Rodriguez-Velazquez,S
Books
MTH
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
The Bacon Terminator (3) What if the whole world went vegan? Although medical practitioners are divided on the health benefits of veganism, some people who practice vegan lifestyles claim that they are the solution to complex worldwide problems including diseases of affluence (such as heart diseases, diabetes, and cancer); malnutrition; animal rights; and climate change. This course considers the complex role of nutrition in solving our contemporary health and environmental crises, specifically how biologic, religious, economic, moral, and social factors affect our food choices, and how those choices in turn affect the world we live in.
CLOSED
033
Future of Technology Policy
03.00
Quirk,J
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Future of Technology Policy (3) From the politics of social media and autonomous vehicles to asteroid mining, gene editing, and environmental issues, to innovations and implications not yet imagined, the future of technology policy is as interesting and important as ever. This course examines what we as consumers, entrepreneurs, citizens, and policymakers need to be thinking about and what kinds of skills are needed to shape emerging industries. The course uses traditional and non-traditional methods to examine these questions and develop possible answers.
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034
No Such Thing as Pop/Classicl
03.00
Doyle,S
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
No Such Thing as Pop/Classical (3) Classifications of high and low art in music and disagreements on those boundaries have always been part of the conversations among composers, performers, and listeners. Now more than ever, these lines continue to blur, and genre classification arguments are found from the concert hall to iTunes. This course explores the roles that creators, presenters, audience, and the market play in the identities and interactions of musical genres. By considering music alongside the contemporaneous evolution of styles of literature, film, drama, and the visual arts, the course seeks to clarify how germane such distinctions are in the ever fast-changing landscape of our contemporary culture. Students contemplate their own background as consumers of the arts alongside guided listening and viewing examples as well as relevant readings on culture, aesthetics, commodification, and transmission in pursuit of understanding how distinct these genres truly are.
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035
Asia's Conflict Flashpoints
03.00
Calabrese,J
Books
W
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Asia's Conflict Flashpoints (3) Through an examination of three flashpoints of conflict in Asia: Taiwan Strait, the East/South China Sea, and the Korean Peninsula, this course addresses why interstate conflicts occur, what causes them to become intractable or to escalate in intensity such that they threaten regional or international security, and to what extent the United States could, or should, play a role in helping to defuse or resolve them The course explores the origins and dynamics of each of these disputes and the interplay between them insofar as U.S. interests and involvement are concerned. Students investigate the tangled roots and evolution of these disputes through various lenses, focusing on competing historical narratives and grievances, geopolitical and resource-related rivalries, and issues related to domestic politics and national identity. In looking at dispute dynamics, the relative military and other capabilities of and the tools deployed by the disputants, as well as the interests and involvement of extra-regional powers, the United States in particular, are considered. In addressing the issue of whether and how these conflicts can be managed or resolved, students consider the various initiatives and instruments that have been, or could be, employed.
OPEN
036
Quenching World Water Scarcity
03.00
Sosland,J
Books
W
02:30PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Quenching World Water Scarcity (3) Today's global and local water challenges require innovative and interdisciplinary solutions. To better understand the options and solutions to the world's water problems this course studies, analyzes, and investigates the questions of whether there is enough drinkable water to meet future global needs, whether water is a U.S. national security issue and twenty-first century wars will be fought over water, whether economically struggling countries can develop without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation, whether everyone has a right to clean drinking water or if it should be treated as any commodity, what is the state of water infrastructure, and how business and scientific innovation can create new sources of water. Individual and team projects develop critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills.
CLOSED
037
Exoplanets in Fact and Fiction
03.00
Harry,G
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Exoplanets in Fact and Fiction (3) This course looks at the amazing discovery of planets around stars other than the sun. This wondrous adventure is happening right now and showing us much more about our place in the universe. Students explore how these discoveries are made, what the planets being discovered are like, and what these discoveries tell us about stars, planets, planetary systems, and the overall universe around us. The course also examines some of what the future may hold with these new worlds; if they are accessible to humans and could be new homes for humans and other members of the biosphere, as well as what they tell us about the possibility of life and even intelligence not from Earth. What we are learning now is compared with what people have imagined other worlds to be like through readings of science fiction and mythology.
CANCELLED
038
Constructions of Self & Other
03.00
Doud,T
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Constructions of Self and Other (3) Establishing one's identitie(s) is both real and invented. How one reads other's projected identitie(s) in a multi-platform culture is complicated, not only by how people adorn themselves, but by our media choices. From avatars on social media (Instagram, YouTube, Tinder) to online simulation platforms (Open Simulator and SecondLife), and from fan conventions (Otakon, Comic Con) to festivals (Afropunk), notions of the constructed self destabilize conventional models of the singular identity. Using an interdisciplinary and inter-media approach, this course introduces the ways people shape their identities across a variety of cultural perspectives.
CLOSED
040
Global Hip-Hop and Resistance
03.00
Dibinga,O
Books
MTH
08:10AM
09:25AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Global Hip-Hop and Resistance (3) This course explores the enduring question of why and how hip-hop has become equally a tool for revolution and capitalist expansion across the world. As hip-hop has attained the interest of corporate America, it has gone from being vilified by many in the mainstream to a source of expansion for American ideals. As hip-hop began to emerge in other countries, it also began to develop its own country-specific narrative. Across the globe, the effects of hip-hop can be felt from politics and education to pop culture and religion, from the Arab Spring to the whitewashing of history books in Japan. The course explores how hip-hop has become a source of revolution and capitalist expansion for some of the world's most marginalized (and not-so-marginalized) populations.
CANCELLED
041
Imagining the Future
03.00
Kakoudaki,D
Books
MTH
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Imagining the Future (3) How do we imagine the political structures, landscapes, challenges, and bodies of the future? This interdisciplinary course traces the visual, literary, and political implications of the way the future has been imagined through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Exciting and revealing, visions of the future reflect both dreams and biases, and express desire for global collaboration, fears of nuclear or environmental disaster, and cultural and political aspirations and limits. Starting from science fictional dreams of the future in literature and film, this course interrogates concepts of utopian and dystopian futurity, collective action, danger and heroism, community, nationalism, and globalization.
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042
Entreprenrshp & Sustainability
03.00
Figueroa-Armijos,M
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Entrepreneurship and Sustainability (3) Thoughtful understanding of the complexity of the relationship between business and sustainability requires an elementary understanding of critical technical concepts and trends at the intersection of both. Business is the engine that drives global economic growth and innovation. However, "business as usual" has reached dangerous levels of consumption and resource scarcity which could produce an unsustainable future. Through in-depth analysis of contemporary real business cases and a sustainable product pitch as a final project, this course prepares students to be managers and leaders of businesses who can take bold, practical actions that benefit people, the planet and the bottom line in the competitive global economy.
CANCELLED
044
Compet Advantage in Business
03.00
Elms,H
Books
MTH
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Competitive Advantage in Business (3) This course provides students with an opportunity to develop their existing critical thinking skills through a specific focus on the concept and empirical phenomenon of competitive advantage in business (i.e., superior stakeholder value creation). The course addresses a variety of sources of competitive advantage and the interactions between them (macroenvironmental and industry forces, corporate, business, and functional strategies), as well as issues associated with the history and role of business in society, stakeholder engagement, and performance measurement. Readings and assignments focus on critically analyzing current media coverage of competitive advantage in business and case studies.
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045
Theorizing Totalitarianism
03.00
Adcock,R
Books
TF
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Theorizing Totalitarianism (3) Hitler's rise to power led to totalitarianism in Germany and ultimately into the cataclysms of the Holocaust and World War II. It also spurred the exodus of a wave of intellectuals from Central Europe. This seminar examines major works by emigre intellectuals who combined sweeping historical perspective, theoretical ambition, and personal commitment as they strove to understand what had gone wrong. Moving chronologically, the course starts with theories of the character and origins of totalitarianism written between the rise of Hitler and the outbreak of world war, and then moves on to works written during the war, and finally in its aftermath. In doing so, emigres located in diverse scholarly fields, who held widely differing political views, are compared as contributors to a dramatic unfolding debate about the cataclysmic problem of totalitarianism.
OPEN
046
Small Things with Big Impact
03.00
Lansigan,M
Books
TF
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Small Things with Big Impact (3) When Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon, he said that it was "a small step for man and a giant leap for mankind." Today, this new "giant leap" may be represented by the advancement of "small steps" in nanotechnology, a rapidly developing area of science regarded as a portal to a new world, where small structures create tremendous impact. "Nano" may be a little word, but it has created a seismic shift in almost every aspect of science, with implications for economics, ethics, public policy, and environmental safety. This course explores the convergence of various disciplines that nanoscientists draw information from, and how these different sectors contribute to nanotechnology advancement. Students gain a variety of perspectives about the benefits and risks associated with nanotechnology and how today's innovations will shape our future.
WAIT-2
047
International Intervention
03.00
Cromwell,A
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
International Intervention (3) This course looks at how the international community works to support victims of mass violence, injustice, brutal dictatorships, and poverty around the world. Moreover, how the inaction of the international community (in places such as Rwanda and Bosnia), as well as the recent failures of the West in the Middle East (e.g., Libya), has shaped current military, humanitarian, and post-conflict peacebuilding interventions. Through readings, discussions, case studies, and video clips, students survey interventions in contexts of mass violence where vulnerable populations are at the mercy of dictatorships or rebel groups with little regard for human life and the multiple perspectives associated with how, when, and if international actors should intervene. The course explores the responses of the international community in post-conflict contexts, the interplay between various actors in these contexts, standard processes of peacebuilding, and critiques of these approaches from different disciplines.
WAIT-1
048
Design Thinking for Innovation
03.00
Bellows,W
Books
W
02:30PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Design Thinking for Innovation (3) This course helps students understand and apply a powerful new approach to solving complex problems through human-centered thinking. Design thinking is a problem-solving framework that is transforming fields from entertainment to international development. Students learn critical thinking, empathy, how to question assumptions, how to clearly define a problem, and other core tools of reasoning. Student teams apply each step of the design thinking process, from research through observation of real people with real problems to brainstorming, prototyping, testing, and finally identifying how to implement the solution. The course work is creative, collaborative, and experiential, from making an observation video, filling a wall with sticky notes, to designing a prototype in the university maker space.
OPEN
050
Doing Better At Doing Good
03.00
Choutka,A
Books
MTH
04:05PM
05:20PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Course Type: Community Based Learning. As a part of this course, students will actively serve with a nonprofit agency or school in the DC area to apply their course knowledge. Doing Better at Doing Good (3) This course examines the conversation on poverty in Washington, DC through scholarship, research, and community-based service-learning with an afterschool program. Horton's Kids is a local nonprofit that serves families in Ward 8's Wellington Park neighborhood, where the average household income is below $10,000 a year. Students discover how Horton's Kids has evolved since 1989 using a comprehensive service model to address the cyclical needs of the community and adopting more inclusive practices. Students connect their work in the community to their work in the classroom by researching, writing, and reflecting on poverty in this neighborhood. Students learn how to reimagine service, focusing on reciprocity and equity. Readings cover a range of perspectives, from historians, sociologists, psychologists, public health scholars and professionals, service-learning and social justice scholars, community partners, community members, nonprofit professionals, policy makers, contemporary public intellectuals, and cultural critics.
WAIT-2
051
Wildlife Conservation
03.00
Heckel,H
Books
W
11:20AM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Wildlife Conservation (3) The World Wildlife Fund recently reported that total wildlife populations declined over 50% between 1970 and 2010. Students in this course explore the primary causes of habitat and wildlife loss including consumption, pollution, and climate change. Students then engage with diverse political, economic, and social approaches to preserving and protecting the remaining biodiversity. Students actively and personally consider how individuals and their communities can communicate about and contribute to wildlife conservation.
WAIT-1
052
Place and Politics
03.00
Houser,S
Books
MTH
11:20AM
12:35PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Place and Politics (3) So much of our lives today takes place in the virtual world of the internet that it is easy to forget or ignore the ways in which our physical environment affects our behavior and our self-understanding. This course explores different theories of place and why place matters for politics. The course includes an examination of how architecture and design can create or destroy community, the consequences of residential segregation, the importance of public space and monuments, the relationship between place and civic virtue, and the meaningfulness of boundaries.
CANCELLED
053
Diversity in STEM
03.00
Bentley,A
Books
TF
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
CANCELLED
Diversity in STEM (3) While 70 percent of white students who pursue a bachelor's degree in a STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) field will earn one, only 49 percent of Hispanic students and 42 percent of African-American students will. This underrepresentation of minorities in STEM is a persistent problem, despite enormous policy and financial attention. In this course students investigate the sources of this underrepresentation. Readings include scholarly and popular articles from diverse disciplines including the sciences, law, and policy. The course enables students to analyze and develop strategies that address underrepresentation and understand why STEM is different from other professions.
CLOSED
054
Incivility
03.00
Weis,L
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Incivility (3) In our society, divided by inequality and ideology, many demand civil discourse to solve the problem of incivility. This course challenges our assumptions about incivility and "civil discourse." Course themes may include how ideals of civility connect to language and emotion; how the normalization of civility connects to colonialism, imperialism, and globalization; whether movements employing 'uncivil' practices (suffrage, labor, civil rights, feminist, LGBTQ, disability rights, Occupy, Black Lives Matter) reject civility as an ideal and/or challenge us to think more deeply about truly "civil discourse." Students read texts from disciplines such as literature, philosophy, political science, anthropology, technology studies, gender studies, and sociology.
OPEN
055
Maxing Out Planet Earth
03.00
Alonzo,M
Books
MTH
08:10AM
09:25AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Maxing Out Planet Earth (3) How many people can our planet support? This course explores the controversial ways in which humans use technology (e.g., large dams, GMO) and policy (e.g., energy subsidies) to support more people with higher qualities of life. Students examine these controversies with readings such as Paul Ehrlich's The Population Bomb and Marc Reisner's Cadillac Desert, movies including Chinatown, and field trips to visit DC think tanks and a nearby sustainable farm.
OPEN
056
Imagining the Future
03.00
Kakoudaki,D
Books
MTH
09:45AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
W
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Imagining the Future (3) How do we imagine the political structures, landscapes, challenges, and bodies of the future? This interdisciplinary course traces the visual, literary, and political implications of the way the future has been imagined through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Exciting and revealing, visions of the future reflect both dreams and biases, and express desire for global collaboration, fears of nuclear or environmental disaster, and cultural and political aspirations and limits. Starting from science fictional dreams of the future in literature and film, this course interrogates concepts of utopian and dystopian futurity, collective action, danger and heroism, community, nationalism, and globalization.
CORE-106
Complex Problems Seminar
CLOSED
001
Imagining the Other
03.00
Morosini-Dominick,M
Books
W
08:10AM
11:00AM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Imagining the Other (3) Grounded in a thorough examination of the various theories of society, such as social Darwinism, and designed around a comparative and multidisciplinary set of scholarly works, literary writings, and primary sources, this course explores the colonial, postcolonial, and imperial interactions between the West and the rest of the world during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It looks at the ways the perception of differences informs reality and conditions the imagining and the construction of the racial, ethnic, and national other. On a more fundamental level, it questions the meaning of modernity and its civilizing processes steeped in the common myth of progress and betterment of itself through rationalization and institutionalization. Special attention is dedicated to examining the way the modern West comes to establish, locate, control, trust, and distrust knowledge and the way the "Other" responds to it, and to the West in general. The comparative and multidisciplinary design of the course helps students develop a more nuanced way of studying the subject, and by doing so, exposes them to new ways of critical thinking. Permission: advisor.
WAIT-3
002
Quest for Justice
03.00
Flanagan,G
Books
MTH
12:55PM
02:10PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Quest for Justice (3) This course introduces students to an on-going dialogue at the core of Western intellectual history about how to think about justice. The course examines how the attempt to achieve clarity about the fundamental problems of justice gives rise to new questions and problems that were not apparent at first. The central theme of the course is intellectual surprise, as new questions emerge from old solutions and new solutions reveal old questions. The course addresses and illustrates questions about law, political obligation, freedom, equality, justice, and human nature. Students examine different societies such as the ancient city, modern democracy, and totalitarianism, and discuss contemporary issues including race, culture, and inequality. Permission: advisor.
WAIT-3
003
Locating the International
03.00
Rancatore,J
Books
TF
02:30PM
03:45PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Locating the International (3) This course explores how we understand "the international," which we tend to think of as the line between the "domestic" and the "foreign," but this line is often blurrier than we think. Students begin by engaging with a range of scholarly material--from Greek, modern European, Confucian, and other non-Western traditions--to develop a critical sense of how the international is constituted and defined. They then explore the ethical implications of those different definitions. Permission: advisor.
OPEN
004
Arab-Feminist-Muslim-Queer Res
03.00
Young,G
Books
T
05:30PM
08:00PM
TBA
TBA
01/14/19
05/07/19
Arab-Feminist-Muslim-Queer Resistance (3) This course asks and attempts to answer the question of how critical understanding of Arab/Muslim social experiences is changed when we put ideas about gender and sexuality at the forefront of the analysis. To illustrate structural forces that influence the lives of Arab and Arab American women, queer people, and trans people, the course centers analysis on experience-based knowledge they have produced. Using a mix of materials, the course problematizes both essentialism and exceptionalism regarding gender and sexuality and calls attention to the intersections of gender and sexuality with race, nationality, and religion when thinking about difference. Students explore how shared oppressions connect Arab and Arab American feminists to women of color and third world feminist movements working for social transformation. Rather than prioritizing one liberation struggle over another, the course emphasizes the simultaneity of struggles (against sexism, homophobia, racism, Islamophobia, nativism, and neocolonialism) by women, queer people, and trans people "over there" (in the Arab World) and "over here" (in American society). Permission: advisor.