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Spring 2014 Practica

1) Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility: Extractive Industries in Latin America

Mondays, 2.35-5.15pm

The GEP program will again sponsor a practicum in partnership with the “International Financial Flows and the Environment” program at the World Resources Institute. The project is intended to encourage China to adopt stronger environmental and social policies in its overseas investments. Students will research and write case studies of best and worst examples of overseas investments. This spring, the focus will be on the mining industry in Latin America--possibly Peru-- because the issue is highly controversial there and it has already generated substantial secondary research on which students may build. The team will pay special attention to Chinese investment as well as best and worst examples of international investment from other parts of the world. Some students may work remotely with Chinese students at Zhongnan University in Changsha in Central South China, a center of Chinese research on the mining industry. Some team members will have the opportunity to travel to Latin America during Spring Break to conduct interviews and make field visits. A few might travel to China to conduct interviews with Chinese mining officials there. Others may participate in the practicum through non-travel research options. WRI plans to use these studies to make recommendations to the Chinese government and to provide curriculum content for Chinese companies. The Partner organization for this practicum is the World Resources Institute.

Selection criteria: Students applying for this practicum should have some background, demonstrated through coursework or applied experience, in one or more of the following areas: global resources extraction and extractive industries; social and environmental standards and assessments; global environmental politics; international financial flows. Prior travel/residence in Latin America studying environmental issues is a plus. Students traveling to Latin America to conduct field work must have fluency or strong proficiency in Spanish.

Professor: Judith Shapiro teaches in the Global Environmental Politics program and directs the Dual Degree in Natural Resources and Sustainable Development (NRSD) with University for Peace in Costa Rica. She is the author of China's Environmental Challenges (Polity 2012), Mao's War against Nature (Cambridge 2001) and the co-author of Son of the Revolution (Knopf 1983) and other books on China. Her courses include Environment and Politics, the Washington Environmental Workshop, and Environmental Politics of Asia.

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2) The Environmental and Social Implications of AU’s Carbon Offsets Purchases

Fridays 2:35 pm - 5:15 pm

As part of AU’s commitment to achieving carbon neutrality by 2020, the university has entered into a carbon-offset agreement with the non-profit organization Pax Natura, involving forest preservation and carbon sequestration in Costa Rica. The program is designed to offset carbon emissions resulting from travel on university business, including study abroad. Purchasing offsets in general, and avoided deforestation in particular, are controversial carbon reduction strategies, and offset programs operate at highly variable levels of effectiveness. The practicum team will assess the environmental and social impacts of AU’s carbon offsets investment. Tasks will include an analysis of the claims made about the Pax Naturaproject, a comparison with best practices in the carbon offset field, and design and execution of a field-based rapid appraisal of social and ecological impacts in Costa Rica. This practicum involves travel to Costa Rica over spring break to conduct the field appraisal. The partner organizations for this practicum are American University Office of Sustainability and University for Peace, Costa Rica.

Selection criteria: Students applying for this practicum should have some background, demonstrated through coursework or applied experience, in one or more of the following areas: conservation forestry/sustainable forestry; rapid appraisal techniques; social and environmental impact assessment; climate change financing; carbon offset programs. Successful completion of SIS 620 “Climate Change Politics” and/or SIS 620 “Post-carbon Transitions” is a plus.

Professor: TBD

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3) U.S. Farm Bill: Agricultural Policy for (Inter)-National Social and Ecological Resilience

Tuesdays, 8.10-10.40pm

Working with the Rural Coalition and National Family Farm Coalition, the practicum team will create an online toolkit to assist efforts by grassroots organizations to reform the next farm bill in the direction of equitable and sustainable agriculture. In developing content for the toolkit, the team will identify, evaluate and compare different policy options related to land access for small and beginning farmers, food aid reform, and crop insurance. The partner organizations for this practicum are the Rural Coalition and the National Family Farm Coalition.

Selection criteria: Students applying for this practicum should have a background, demonstrated through coursework or applied experience, in food systems/food policy. In addition, any of the following would be a plus: proficiency in Geographic Information Systems, successful completion of SIS 620 Political Ecology of Food and Agriculture, and/or work or volunteer experience with a food or agriculture NGO, government agency or multilateral agency.

Professor: Adam Diamond holds a PhD in geography from Rutgers University. Prior to coming to SIS, he worked for the United States Department of Agriculture, where he conducted applied research on local food system development as a strategy for enhancing small and mid-sized farm viability. He also has served as an adjunct instructor in geography at George Washington University and worked as a political organizer for the Sierra Club. Dr. Diamond’s dissertation was on the structure and development of the organic milk commodity chain in the Northeast United States.

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4) Analysis of U.S. Policy toward Egypt

Mondays, 5.30-8.00pm

Given the likelihood that Egypt will face instability for some time and that U.S. policymakers will have to grapple with balancing various U.S. interests (strategic, political, and economic) as they formulate policy toward that country, this practicum course is designed to guide students in preparing a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of U.S. interests in Egypt and to present their findings and their policy prescriptions to the State Department's Policy Planning Staff. After briefings on Egypt and U.S. foreign relations in Egypt as well as in the region as a whole, students will be assigned to one of three issue areas (strategic, political, or economic) to explore, and each group will prepare an analysis of their topic. The class will then be responsible for putting the three analytical papers together in a comprehensive and lucid report, along with cogent policy recommendations. The report will then be presented to the Policy Planning staff officials, and students will have the opportunity to orally brief these officials on the report's highlights. The instructor will guide and advise the students through this entire process. The partner organization for this practicum is the U.S. Department of State.

Professor: Gregory Aftandilian is an independent consultant, writer, and lecturer, with over 21 years in government service. He was foreign policy advisor to Congressman Chris Van Hollen (2007-08), professional staff member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and foreign policy adviser to Senator Paul Sarbanes (2000-04), and foreign policy fellow to Senator Edward Kennedy (1999). Prior to these positions, Mr. Aftandilian worked for 13 years as a Middle East analyst at the U.S. Department of State where he was a recipient of the Department’s Superior Honor Award for his analyses on Egypt. His other government experiences include analytical work for the U.S. Department of Defense and the Library of Congress. He was also a research fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (2006-07) and an International Affairs Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York (1991-92). In addition, Mr. Aftandilian has worked as a consultant on Egyptian affairs for the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, and is an adjunct faculty member at Boston University and Northeastern University.

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5) U.S. Democracy Promotion in Morocco/Jordan

Tuesdays, 5.30-8.00pm

This practicum will study the democracy promotion programs undertaken by the U.S. Government (USG) in Jordan and/or Morocco. Specifically, they will review those developed and managed by the U.S. Department of State, the Agency for International Development, the Department of Justice, the Department of Defense, the National Endowment for Democracy, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, the International Republican Institute for International Affairs, the Free Trade Union Institute, the Committee for International Private Enterprise, and the U.S. Institute for Peace. The practicum participants may travel to Jordan or Morocco to interview local partners of the USG and to learn which programs have had the desired results and why and which have not had the desired results and why. The objective of the practicum will be to provide the practicum’s client with an independent evaluation of the USG’s programs and recommendations for strengthening of the programs. The client for this practicum could be any of the above USG agencies involved in democracy promotion.

Professor: Ambassador Sally Shelton-Colby has held a number of senior positions in the public, corporate and non-profit sectors and in international organizations. She has been Deputy Secretary-General of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris, France; Assistant Administrator for Global Programs at the U.S. Agency for International Development; U.S. Ambassador to Grenada, Barbados and several other Eastern Caribbean countries; Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Latin America; and Legislative Assistant to Senator (later Secretary of the Treasury) Lloyd Bentsen. She was Vice President of Bankers Trust Co., where she was responsible for managing the bank’s political risk in developing countries during the third world debt crisis of the 1980s. Ambassador Shelton-Colby has served on several non-profit boards, including the National Endowment for Democracy and the National Democratic Institute. She was a Fulbright Scholar at the Institut des Sciences Politiques in Paris.

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6) Intelligence Analysis

Wednesdays, 5.30-8.00pm

The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) is the client for this practicum on intelligence. The class produces an intelligence report intended to serve as a DIA product to be posted on their internal web site serving the intelligence, defense, and State Department communities. The topic is selected after discussions with DIA management and based on intelligence priorities at the time. DIA priorities currently focus on instabilities in the Balkan States, the changing political/military climate in Latin America, growing national security concerns in the Arctic, and the increasing involvement of the People's Republic of China in the European Theater. However, national security priorities shift rapidly and other evolving issues may be addressed. The partner organization for this practicum is the Defense Intelligence Agency.

Professor: David Martin-McCormick began teaching at AU in January 2009 after retiring from a long and successful career in the U.S. Intelligence Community. He teaches courses focused on national security and the intelligence community. He had a broad career working for the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Arms Control Intelligence Staff, the Community Management Staff, the Intelink Management Office and the Director of National Intelligence. He was heavily involved in bringing innovative technologies and approaches to analysis in the intelligence agencies. He was the U.S. Representative to NATO and to the Conventional Forces in Europe negotiating team for issues dealing with information exchange. Substantively, he worked on issues dealing with the Soviet Union, China and terrorism. In the last five years of his intelligence career, he was heavily involved in attempting to improve information sharing within the intelligence community.

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7) Engaging and Strengthening the Security Sector in Balkan, Caucasus, and Central Asian Countries.

Thursdays, 5.30-8.00pm

The U.S. is drawing down its forces engaged in Afghanistan. At the same time, it is pulling back advisers that have been working with the defense sector in the Balkans, in the Caucasus, and in Central Asia. These advisors have prepared military units to be interoperable with NATO forces and then to deploy to Afghanistan as part of the peacekeeping force there. The U.S. and its key NATO allies have taken advantage of these engagements to encourage the partners’ leadership to adopt the Euro-Atlantic model as they developed their national security strategy and Ministries of Defense (MoDs). This has included firm civilian control of the armed forces. In the absence of this vehicle, the U.S. along with its NATO allies, is seeking ways to maintain engagement and therefore influence with the partner MoDs. The research will include analysis of key documents reporting on U.S. (and in some cases NATO allied) programs to engage with partner militaries supplemented by interviews with decision makers in the Departments of Defense, State, and the NSC who are responsible for engagements with partner countries. The team will prepare a menu of “tools” the U.S. government has to engage and influence the leaders of the security sectors of these countries with an evaluation of their potential utility. The client for this practicum is the senior policy maker for Partnership Strategy on the Secretary of Defense’s staff.

Professor: Stuart E. Johnson is a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corporation, where he directs studies that focus on national security strategy and the forces and resources needed to implement the strategy. He is also a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. From 2002 to 2007, Johnson served as director of research in the Center for Technology and National Security Policy at National Defense University (NDU), where he directed a program analyzing the future U.S. national security environment and how to translate that into choices for defense policy and planning. From 1997 to 2002, Johnson directed the International Security and Defense Policy Center within the RAND National Defense Research Institute. Prior to joining RAND, he was director of research at NDU's Institute for National Strategic Studies. He planned and executed a program of study in support of senior decisionmakers in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) and the Joint Staff. He also served as director of systems analysis at NATO Headquarters, directing a multinational staff of analysts to develop requirements for the forces of NATO nations, and as principal European/NATO analyst in OSD, Program Analysis and Evaluation.

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8) Innovation in Hungary

Wednesdays, 8.10-10.40pm

Over the past nearly 25 years, the “newly emerging” Hungarian economy has overcome many obstacles on its way to becoming a stable democracy. During the 1990’-s, Hungary’s young market economy privatized state-owned companies and established institutions to foster and regulate businesses, such as the SEC and the Hungarian stock market, in order to attract foreign investment and encourage re-structuring of traditional Hungarian companies. The Hungarian government wants to foster the growth of new, innovative start-up companies in order to move its economy to the next stage. Some new and exciting companies, such as Prezi, have emerged in Hungary in the past few years. Hungary historically has been strong in the health care and IT sectors, yet its new companies find it difficult to find sources of finance. Bank loans are 9% and Hungarian private equity funds invest in established businesses only. The newly formed Hungarian National Office of Innovation within the Ministry of Economy and Innovation is the client for this practicum. Working with the Office of Innovation, a student team will work closely with Ministry officials and provide research and recommendations on how Hungary can institute crowd-funding in that country. The team will use the UK, Scandinavian and Finnish recent experiences as models for Hungary. Another team will advise the Ministry on other alternative financing techniques that may be introduced into Hungary via encouragement of the Office of Innovation such as Peer to Peer Lending, ESOPs, and factoring. A third student team will examine whether the US-style B corporation system could be instituted in Hungary. B Corporations have been recently legislated in 19 states, beginning with Maryland, as well as the District of Columbia. Benefit corporations have to prove to the State in which they are incorporated – via a certification process –that they have socially responsible policies. A fourth student team will assist a client organization from the Hungarian non-profit sector. It is anticipated that at least one team will travel to Budapest to confer with Ministry officials and Hungarian start-up companies. The partner organizations for this practicum are the Hungarian National Office of Innovation and a Hungarian nonprofit organization.

Professor: Catherine Bocskor recently retired from a 40-year career in international law and international business. Most recently she served as General Counsel for two Washington, DC multinational corporations. In 2012 she taught macroeconomics, international business and business law at Prince Mohammad University in Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia. During the 1990’s her law practice was in Budapest, Hungary where she also formed and managed two investment funds. This experience led to her research interest in Transitional Justice. Prof. Bocskor has now returned to teach at SIS, her undergraduate alma mater.

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9) Issues in International Economics and Business

Tuesdays, 8.10-10.40

This practicum offers the opportunity to work on one of several issues involving international economics and business of interest to a U.S. multinational corporation “client” headquartered in the District of Columbia or its vicinity, or else to a foreign company wanting to do business in the United States. Four teams of students will be tasked with assessing economic and political risks and opportunities for four multinational clients. For example, the client company may be contemplating expanding its business presence into a particular country and wants to know the pros and cons of such an expansion. Or a foreign company may want to expand its business into the United States. Each team will focus on making recommendations for a course of action for one client company. The team will research the client company’s international economic or business issue, produce a written report with recommendations for the client, and. make an oral report to the client company, and also to fellow students and faculty. The clients for this practicum are four multinational companies.

Professor: Catherine Bocskor (see above)

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10) Cultural Diplomacy and International Exchange

Tuesdays, 5.30-8.00pm

International exchange programs are an essential component of public diplomacy. Practicum participants will study major actors and resources in the field as well as a conceptual framework for evaluating the effectiveness of exchanges. Each of three teams of students will research and report on one of the following topics: 1) international student flows and U.S. and Dutch efforts to recruit international students and provide enrichment activities in their capital cities; 2) building a domestic constituency for exchanges; and 3) recruiting Millennials to participate in citizen diplomacy programs. One student team’s research may involve travel to The Hague. Clients include the International Student House in Washington, DC /the City of The Hague, the Alliance for International Educational and Cultural Exchange, and the National Council for International Visitors.

Professor: Sherry Lee Mueller, Ph.D. developed and taught the first course in public diplomacy at SIS in 1981 (and continued teaching throughout the 1980s) as an adjunct professor and returned in 2012 as an adjunct to pioneer a course in cultural diplomacy and international exchange. Her professional career included serving as Director of Professional Exchange Programs at the Institute of International Education and President of the National Council for International Visitors. She has served as a State Department speaker on NGO leadership in Saudi Arabia and Japan. Georgetown University Press will publish the second edition of Working World Careers in International Education, Exchange and Development that she co-authored with fellow SIS grad, Mark Overmann. Her work and publications have focused on the evaluation of exchange programs - citizen diplomacy, and advocacy.

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11) Promoting Human Rights and Non-Violent Conflict Resolution

Tuesdays, 8.10-10.40pm

This practicum partners student teams with two of the finest NGOs committed to promoting respect for human rights, democratic principles, and non-violent conflict resolution—Amnesty International USA (AIUSA) and Freedom House. This practicum emphasizes the need for NGOs committed to the above ideals to continuously evolve in their strategic thinking. In 2014, AIUSA will be working on a number of human rights issues that will need additional capacity to engage in issue, policy and market research, develop strategy options for our programmatic and campaign priorities, and also contribute to long range planning processes for setting the organization’s programmatic areas for the next 5 years and beyond. Freedom House has been implementing programs to advance women’s rights operating primarily from a “women’s empowerment” paradigm that no longer contours to the best thinking in the field. Students will be tasked with developing one or more analytical frameworks that would inform and strengthen our newly articulated strategic goals. The partner organizations for this practicum are Amnesty International USA and Freedom House.

Professor: Jeff Bachman is a professorial lecturer at SIS, and is interim co-director of the Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs program. He focuses in genocide, U.S. foreign policy and human rights, and state responsibility and individual accountability for violations of human rights law and international humanitarian law. He is especially interested in the misuse of the law as a political tool through its selective application and enforcement. Bachman has field experience working for Amnesty International in the Government Relations for Europe/Eurasia program.

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12) Multilateral Institutions: The US Love-Hate Relationship with Internationalism and Public Diplomacy

Mondays, 5.30-8.00pm

This practicum will explore the role multilateral institutions play in the early 21st century, US attitudes, expectations, fragility and the challenges and opportunities for effective multilateralism. What works and why? Is it possible to change the paradigm? What are the pressure points and the success stories? What is the outlook? Students will work with specific multilateral institutions and those evaluating them to assess meaning, value, viability, operations, public attitudes, and special challenges internally and externally. There will be an evaluation of the global context in which these institutions find themselves and why (as has been raised in a recent Foreign Policy article) there is a “leaning in” “’leaning away”. Students will conduct evaluations of specific institutions in regard to these questions, and help the client determine whether they are heading in the right direction for short/long term success and offer specific recommendations. The expectation is that there will be “’actionable”” insights and viable next steps at the end of the semester based on student analysis and assessment. Client organizations worked with last year include the UN Foundation, the Dept. of State Office of Public Diplomacy and the US Global Leadership Coalition. Clients for this practicum may include the UN Development Program, the Council on Foreign Relations, PEW Trust and/or the Department of State, depending on class size and real-time assessment.

Professor: Jill A. Schuker is the current Head of the Washington Center for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Ms Schuker brings to the OECD over 30 years of expertise in public diplomacy and communication strategy. She has worked across the globe with both governments and societies in transition on a range of civil society, social responsibility, governance, modernization, reform, policy, media, evaluation and leadership issues. She has also advised and liaised with highest-level officials in the public and private sectors, multi-lateral institutions, policy think-tanks and NGOs as a strategic and tactical counselor. Ms Schuker served in several positions at the White House: as Special Assistant to President Clinton for National Security Affairs, as well as Senior Director for Public Affairs at the National Security Council and Deputy Communications Director.

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13) Transformation and Peacebuilding

Wednesdays, 8.10-10.40pm

The practicum places students in INGOs, such as Partners for Democratic Change, and CHF International, and government agencies, such as the U.S. State Department Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations (CSO). Students undertake studies and conduct analysis of programs that focus on war-to-peace transitions. These are carried out at the headquarters of client organizations and may involve fieldwork at projects sites overseas. Clients for this practicum may include the INGOs and government agencies listed above.

Professor: Hrach Gregorian is President of the Institute of World Affairs, a DC NGO which has been engaged in conflict resolution and peacebuilding training, research and consultation since the early 1990s in the U.S. and numerous other countries. He was a Director at the U.S. Institute of Peace from 1988 to 1993, and is a co-founder and current board member of the Alliance for Peacebuilding.

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14) Strategic Communications

Thursdays, 5.30-8.00pm

This practicum emphasizes the central role of information-intensive activities in an organization's mission and planning. Students in this practicum will be assigned to projects with major international or non-governmental organizations that emphasize public policy issues concerning the role of communications in governance, or that apply communication skills to organizational needs in social media, business development, outreach, and communication campaigns. Project work will result in organizational strategic plans, media and outreach strategies, policy positions, and public relations strategies. Students that have foreign language capabilities, social media skills, familiarity with information and communication public policy issues, and general international relations skills are especially desirable. Partner organizations for this practicum are NGOs to be announced.

Professor: Eric J. Novotny has been appointed Senior Advisor, Democracy and Technology, at the U.S. Agency for International Development. In this position, Dr. Novotny designs and manages a large portfolio of programs that use advanced information and communication technologies (ICTs) to stimulate economic growth, improve democratic processes, and reform governance policies in developing countries. Some of these efforts are stand-alone technology and governance projects while others will embed advanced ICTs in larger development projects in applied areas such as service delivery and critical infrastructure. USAID has assistance programs in 80 countries worldwide.

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15) Foreign Defense Policy

Wednesdays, 8.10-10.40pm

The Middle East is experiencing extraordinary security challenges and fundamental changes within and among countries in the region that require high-level U.S. leadership, attention and restructured strategies. The Arab Awakening empowered diverse elements within regional societies, changed regimes, and sparked violence. Its future direction is very much in question, particularly in Syria, where civil war has now wracked the country for nearly two years. Iran's role in regional and global security may be coming to an inflection point, with greater international focus on its weapons programs and support for violent extremists and regimes, even as a new president tries to take control of Iranian policy. The U.S. is challenged to cope with the effects of peaceful transition, violent transition, and potential new cases--all while seeking change in Iran’s policies.

The product of the practicum will revolve around a hypothetical high-level G-8 conference aimed at harmonizing international action on the most salient issues in the region. An NSC Principals Committee (PC) meeting has been scheduled to decide what issues the U.S. believes should be on the G-8 agenda and what the U.S. positions on these issues will be. Students will work in teams to simulate the U.S. interagency process for developing these positions, with each team representing key department, agency, or staff. The teams will work separately and jointly to narrow the set of issues to be addressed. Each team will develop its agency’s recommended position on each of the issues, which will then be coordinated and debated with the other agency’s in one or more simulated working-level interagency meetings. Finally, each team will prepare written briefing materials and an oral presentation for its agency head to participate in the PC meeting. To simulate the real-world professional experience, a former senior U.S. government official playing the role of each team’s Principal will review the written materials and receive the oral briefings from each team.

Selection Criteria: Strong candidates will have background in/familiarity with Middle Eastern political and security issues and with the U.S. national security process.

Professor: Joseph McMillan is a principal with the Beaconsfield Strategy Group, LLC, a privately operated firm providing consulting services on national security and international policy. Before retiring from the U.S. government in October 2012, Mr. McMillan served 34 years as a civil servant in the Department of Defense, most recently as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs from 2009 to 2012, a position in which he was the senior civil servant advising the Secretary of Defense on issues involving Europe, the former Soviet Union, the Middle East, and Africa. He previously held assignments as principal director for Near East and South Asia and principal director for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia within the staff of the Secretary of Defense and as a senior research fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies. He holds a B.A. from the University of Alabama, did his graduate work in political science at Vanderbilt University, and is a distinguished graduate of the National War College.

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16) Reforming Policy, Coordination and Implementation of U.S. Foreign Aid

Thursdays, 8.10-10.40pm

U.S. foreign aid formerly managed by one U.S. government agency is now provided by over 20 U.S. government agencies, by thousands of non-governmental organizations, large philanthropic foundations, and government partnerships with the private sector. Aid programs originally designed to achieve long-term economic development have been modified by efforts designed to meet more immediate US national security objectives. Each of these agencies, organizations and partnerships applies its own management approach, mission, goals, philosophic point of view and economic, professional or technical specialty to the delivery of foreign aid. In 2008 Barack Obama became President. He submitted his first Foreign Operations Budget Request to the Congress for FY 2010, in the introduction to which he wrote that this was the beginning of a new “Era of Responsibility” for the United States. In September 2010 at a United Nations meeting in New York President Obama presented his new “Global Development Strategy.” Both of these policy statements were designed to improve coordination in the management of U.S. foreign aid. In this practicum course student consultant teams will work on selected parts of the common theme of reforming U.S. foreign aid to better meet the above new policy and coordination framework. This practicum course will enable students to work on reforms that will improve the integration of selected parts of the US foreign aid program so that overall U.S. foreign aid can become the most effective, long-term foreign policy tool.

Professor: Irving Rosenthal is a senior, long-term, U.S. government policy, management, and evaluation practitioner in international economic and social development and U.S. foreign aid management. He is a specialist in governance, democratization, and institution building in new market-oriented economies; as well as an expert in national economic strategic planning, budget policy, and management. Dr. Rosenthal was a Minister-Counselor in U.S. Foreign Service and USAID field Mission Director. He has performed six long-term overseas assignments in Turkey (Public Administration), Tunisia (Program Officer), Ivory Coast (Deputy Director for Sahel and West Africa), Italy (U.S. representative to international food agencies), Niger (USAID Mission Director) and Lithuania (Budget Policy and Management Advisor to Ministry of Finance). He has also been a short term consultant in over 30 countries with concentrations in Africa, the Middle East, and transition countries of the former Soviet Union on such subjects as health, family planning, environmental protection, private sector, education and agricultural development. After retiring from the US government, he served as Chief Operating Officer for two private voluntary organizations - Appropriate Technology International and Organization for Development.

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