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Celebrating Black History Month

Robinson was the first African-American to play Major League Baseball. He was named Rookie of the Year, the first year of the award, and he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame the first year he was eligible.
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The Shaping of Political Behavior

"Throughout my studies, I have been able to explore my interest in studying political violence-specifically, what makes people restrain from political violence, and how these outcomes shape political behavior in the years to come."
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Celebrating Black History Month

Using a pseudonym, Wells wrote editorials in black newspapers challenging Jim Crow laws. She became a prominent anti-lynching activist and later launched the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) and helped create the National Association of Colored People (NAACP).
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Celebrating Black History Month

Known as "Brave Bessie" or the "Nervy Lady," Bessie Coleman, born in 1893, was the first licensed African American female pilot. She was not permitted in American flight schools, so she earned her license in France. To support her dream of establishing a flight school for black pilots, Coleman performed aviation stunts. Ever mindful of the power of her celebrity, Coleman, even during the height of Jim Crow, refused to perform for segregated audiences.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Born in 1912, Dorothy Height spent her entire adult life advocating for the advancement of African American Women. An exceptionally gifted writer and public speaker, she was a fierce believer in interracial dialogue. President Clinton awarded her the Presidential Medal of freedom and Congressional Gold Medal. Upon her passing in 2010, President Barack Obama said she was the "godmother of the civil rights movement."
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Celebrating Black History Month

"The blues" refers to African American folk music born in the southern fields of the early twentieth century. It is considered the first original American musical form. The words, vocals, and instrumentation reflected the social, economic, and political conditions of African Americans.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Born in 1943, he was the first black tennis player selected to the U.S. Davis Cup team and the only black man ever to win the singles title at Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, and the Australian Open. After contracting HIV, Ashe worked to educate the public about HIV and AIDS until he died.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Journalist, abolitionist, orator, advisor to presidents, ambassador, and human rights activist, Frederick Douglass was the most influential African American of the nineteenth century. Douglass educated himself when law specifically prohibited slaves from doing so. He started the first abolitionist newspaper published by a black person in the U.S. and he was the first African American to meet with a president in the White House, consulting with Abraham Lincoln.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Born in 1920, Parker began playing the saxophone at 11 years old, and was playing in bands by 17. Many of his compositions are part of the American jazz songbook. Miles Davis once said," the history of jazz could be summarized in four words: Louis Armstrong and Charlie Parker."
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Celebrating Black History Month

On February 1, 1960, four African American students from North Carolina A&T in Greensboro, N.C., sat down at the F.W. Woolworth's lunch counter and requested service. After being told no, the students remained at the counter until the store closed that evening. By the end of the week, more than 60 African American students gathered to take turns sitting in protest.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Arthur Schomburg emerged in the early twentieth century as the foremost collector, curator, and preservationist of the African American heritage. By the early 1920s he had amassed a collection of archival materials, manuscripts, photographs, personal and organizational records, and slave narratives that was considered the finest in the U.S. if not the world. Along with Carter G. Woodson, Schomburg is considered the cofounder of the African American historical preservationist and education movement.
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Celebrating Black History Month

On July 28, 1917, approximately 10,000 black men, women and children marched silently up Fifth Avenue in New York City to protest recent brutalities toward African Americans throughout the South and Midwest.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Born in 1927, Gibson was the first African American female tennis player to compete in the French Open, Wimbledon, and the U.S. Open. After she retired from tennis, Gibson became the first black woman to play professional golf.
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Celebrating Black History Month

The boycott was the first nonviolent mass protest by African Americans against segregation in the U.S. For more than a year, African Americans in Montgomery, Ala. refused to ride local buses after the arrest of Rosa Parks, who refused to give up her seat to a white passenger.
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Celebrating Black History Month

American University wrestler, Josh Glenn, won the NCAA national championship in his wrestling weight class in 2007. He was AU’s first champion athlete for the university in more than 40 years.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Thomas won the bronze medal in the Women’s Figure Skating singles in 1988. She was the first African-American athlete to capture a Winter Olympics medal.
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Celebrating Black History Month

Robinson was the first African-American to play Major League Baseball. He was named Rookie of the Year, the first year of the award, and he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame the first year he was eligible.
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