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Chenyang Xiao Associate Professor Sociology

Degrees
PhD, Sociology, Washington State University MA, Sociology, University of Toledo, OH BA, Sociology, Peking University, Beijing, China

Languages Spoken
Chinese, English
Bio
Dr. Xiao earned his MA at University of Toledo, OH, and PhD at Washington State University. His main research interests include environmental beliefs, attitudes, behaviors and public opinion over environmental issues. He is also interested in applied social statistics and quantitative research methodology. Dr. Xiao's current project compares the USA and China in terms of environmental concern, specifically gender differences in this subject.
See Also
Sociology Department
For the Media
To request an interview for a news story, call AU Communications at 202-885-5950 or submit a request.

Partnerships & Affiliations

  • District of Columbia Sociological Society
    Member (2008-present)

  • Chinese Sociological Association
    Member (2015-Present)

Scholarly, Creative & Professional Activities

Research Interests

Environmental Sociology: Environmental Attitudes, Beliefs, and Values; Global Environmental Change; Science and Technology; Sustainable Development, Climate Change

 

Research Methods/Statistics: Survey Methods; ANOVA and Regression Analysis; Limited Dependent Variable/Logit and Log-Linear Analysis; Structural Equation Modeling; Event History Analysis

 

Professional Presentations

2019. Xiao, Chenyang.  “Social Development vs. Environmental Protection: A Discussion on Sustainable Development.” Invited talk at Salons of Young Sociologists, College of Ethnology and Sociology, Minzu University of China, June 5th, 2019.

2019. Xiao, Chenyang.  “Major Theories of Environmental Sociology in the West—A Question-oriented Discussion.” Invited talk at Forums of Environment and Society and Sociology at Hohai University (No. 80), Sociology Department, Hohai University, China on May 9th, 2019.  

2017.  Dunlap, Riley E., Chenyang Xiao, and Aaron McCright.  “Predicting Public Perceptions of an Abnormally Cold Winter: The Impacts of Temperature versus Political Orientation.”  Paper presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of American Sociological Association.  Montreal, QC, Canada, August 12-15, 2017.

2016Xiao, Chenyang, and Riley E. Dunlap.  “Ecological Worldview as the Organizing Component of Environmental Concern: Examining the Role of the NEP in Canada, China and the USA”.  Paper presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of American Sociological Association.  Seattle, WA, August 20-23, 2016.

2015.  Xiao, Chenyang.  "China's Economic Growth and Public Conern for the Environment: 2003-2010".  Paper presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of Chinese Sociological Association, Changsha, China, July 11-12, 2015

2014.  Buhrmann, Jan, and Chenyang Xiao.  “Assessing the Integrity of Environmental Worldview Over Time Using the New Environmental Paradigm Scale.”  Paper presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of American Sociological Association. San Francisco, CA, August 10-13, 2014.

2013. McCright, Aaron M. Riley E. Dunlap, and Chenyang Xiao.  “Increasing Influence of Political Orientation on Support for Government Action on Climate Change in the USA, 2006-2012.”  Paper presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of American Sociological Association.  New York City, NY, August 10-13, 2013.

2013.  Xiao, Chenyang, Dayong Hong, and Erik Kojola.  “Explaining the Rising Environmentalism in China—Postmaterialism, Affluence, Or Global Environmentalism?”  Paper presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of American Sociological Association.  New York City, NY, August 10-13, 2013.

Selected Publications

2019.  Xiao, Chenyang, and Jan Buhrmann.  “Ideas to Action: Environmental Beliefs, Behaviors, and Support for Environmental Policies.”  Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences 9(2): 196-205, DOI: 10.1007/s13412-019-00541-4.

2019.  Xiao, Chenyang, Riley E. Dunlap, and Dayong Hong.  “Ecological Worldview as the Central Component of Environmental Concern: Clarifying the Role of the NEP.”  Society and Natural Resources, 32(1), 53-72, DOI: 10.1080/08941920.2018.1501529.

2018.  Xiao, Chenyang, and Dayong Hong.  “Gender differences in Environmental Behaviors among the Chinese Public—A Model of Mediation and Moderation.”  Environment and Behavior, 50(9): 975-996, DOI: 10.1177/0013916517723126.

2017.  Xiao, Chenyang, and Jan Buhrmann.  “The Structure and Coherence of the New Environmental Paradigm: Re-Conceptualizing the Dimensionality Debate.”  Human Ecological Review, 23(1): 179-198.

2017.  Xiao, Chenyang, and Dayong Hong.  “Gender Differences in Concerns for the Environment among the Chinese Public: An Update.”  Society and Natural Resources, 30(6): 782-788.  DOI: 10.1080/08941920.2016.1238986

2015.  Xiao, Chenyang, and Aaron M. McCright.  “Gender Differences in Environmental Concern: Revisiting the Institutional Trust Hypothesis in the USA.”  Environment and Behavior 47(1): 17-37.

2014.  McCright, Aaron M., Riley E. Dunlap, and Chenyang Xiao. “The impacts of temperature anomalies and political orientation on perceived winter warming.” Nature Climate Change 4: 1077-1081.

2014.  McCright, Aaron M., Chenyang Xiao, and Riley E. Dunlap.  “Political Polarization on Support for Environmental Spending in the USA, 1974-2012.”  Social Science Research 48: 251-260.

2014.  Kojola, Erik, Chenyang Xiao, and Aaron M. McCright.  “Union Membership and Concern for the Environment.”  The Sociological Quarterly, 55 (1): 72-91.

2014.  Xiao, Chenyang, and Aaron M. McCright.  “A Test of the Biographical Availability Argument for Gender Differences in Environmental Behaviors.”  Environment and Behaviors  46(2): 241–263.

2013.  Xiao, Chenyang, Riley E. Dunlap, and Dayong Hong.  “Nature and Sources of Environmental Concern in China.”  Social Science Quarterly 94(3): 672-690.

2013.  McCright, Aaron M., Riley E. Dunlap, and Chenyang Xiao.  Perceived Scientific Agreement and Support for Government Action on Climate Change in the USA.”  Climatic Change 119: 511-518.

2013.  Xiao, Chenyang.  “Public Attitudes towards Science and Technology and Environmental Concern: A Model of Indirect Feedback Effects.”  Environment and Behavior 45 (1): 113-137.