PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

PUAD-696
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

PUAD-696
001
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Housing Policy

This course gives students a comprehensive overview of U.S. affordable housing policy since the 1930s. Emphasis is given to federal initiatives and systems focused on financing, building, and maintaining affordable housing units across the country. Topics covered include public housing, urban renewal, vouchers (and other mobility programs), public housing demolition, HOPE VI developments, Low Income Housing Tax Credits, subprime lending, and various mechanisms of housing finance.

PUAD-696
001
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Development, Politics, and Policy in Washington, D.C.

This course is designed to give students an overview of neighborhood development, politics, and policy in the nation's capital. In this class students explore the history of planning and development in Washington, D.C. from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century, from the 1791 L'Enfant Plan to the 2005 Duke Ellington U Street Plan. The course focuses heavily on how race and politics, both local and federal, have shaped the contours of D.C.'s physical and social landscape.

PUAD-696
002
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Health Economics and Policy

This course enables students to think critically about questions related to health policy. Students learn how to integrate economic thinking to a range of important health policy questions. They are endowed with the essential knowledge and econometric tools to assess the impact of existing health policies and interventions and to formulate policies to promote healthy behaviors. Prerequisite: PUAD-601 or PUAD-605, and PUAD-630 or PUAD-670.

PUAD-696
003
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Ocean and Coastal Management

The last two decades have seen a growing realization of the economic importance of the ocean, along with widespread recognition that ocean resources are under threat from over exploitation. As a result, the governance of this space is attracting increased attention from scholars and policymakers. This course introduces students to the history and current status of policies for managing ocean space and resources. The course starts by recognizing the enduring view of the ocean as a "limitless expanse with inexhaustible resources," as embodied in the Freedom of the Seas doctrine. It then reviews subsequent efforts to impose controls over this space, from the designation of Territorial Seas, through negotiations over the United Nations' Law of the Sea, to the creation of dozens of national laws and international treaties on fisheries, marine sanctuaries, navigation, ocean pollution, marine mammals, biodiversity, coastal zone management, offshore energy extraction, disaster resilience, and climate change impacts. Particular attention is paid to the interplay between scientific findings, changing human institutions, and policy development. The final section of the course explores recent attempts to introduce more integrative, ecosystem-based, adaptive management approaches, including the introduction of marine spatial planning. A combination of readings, video, lectures, case studies, and active class discussion ensure a thorough and lively coverage of these topics.