Commissioning

Solar Hot Water Panels

American University Master Commissioning Plan (PDF)

Why commissioning?

Facilities Management (FM) has established an enhanced in-house commissioning program to help influence positive outcomes and consistent quality across all campus construction.

What is commissioning?

Commissioning at American University is a collaborative quality assurance process which helps the university to ensure that its projects and facilities are consistent with the University's Design and Construction Standards, emphasize life cycle cost-based decision making, meet operational needs and sustainability goals, and ultimately achieve their design and construction intent. In other words, commissioning is another way for AU to ensure that it is building and maintaining the best facilities it can to support learning, living, and working on campus.

How is commissioning implemented at AU?

Facilities Management coordinates commissioning services for all of the University's Capital Projects, ensuring that operations and maintenance teams are engaged in projects as early as possible to enhance their input and understanding of each building and its systems.

Facilities Management has been involved with the commissioning of all the Capital Projects listed below which encompass 13 new buildings.

  • School of International Service
  • Cassell Hall
  • Nebraska Hall Addition
  • 4401 Connecticut Ave (WAMU)
  • McKinley, School of Communications
  • Washington College of Law (Tenley Campus)
  • The East Campus Expansion

In addition to capital projects, the Facilities Management Staff performs in-house commissioning efforts on Capital Reserve and Deferred Maintenance (CRDM) and other university projects.

AU's commissioning program will continue to grow by integrating retro-commissioning and ongoing commissioning into planned maintenance activities. Retro-commissioning is commissioning of existing facilities that weren't initially commissioned when built.

LEED Volume

Facilities Management works collaboratively with the Office of Sustainability in the University’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Volume Project, an effort which will include the retro-commissioning of 25 existing buildings, and ongoing commissioning thereafter. American University is one of only a few institutions in the world that is helping the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) pilot and establish the LEED Volume framework.