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Campus Plan Feedback and Responses

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Feedback and Responses
Question Number Category Question Response
C-001 COVID-19

It would be helpful for the community to better appreciate how AU will be evaluating its current online education efforts in light of the current health pandemic and whether this is likely to impact how it will operate in the future.

The events of the past several months associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have presented unprecedented challenges across the nation and around the world. Many institutions of higher education, including AU, have responded with focused efforts to quickly transition instruction and operations to predominantly online platforms. Thus far, AU’s efforts are yielding positive results, providing our students with continuity of high-quality educational opportunities while striving to address the social, emotional, financial, and related impacts caused by this sudden disruption in their AU experience. Certainly the outcomes of this experience will shape decision making, inform policy decisions, and influence operational models across all levels of education well into the future. Yet even before COVID-19 unexpectedly precipitated the rapid transition to university-wide online learning, AU identified the development of leading-edge online programming as a core component of the university’s future vision. At the same time, AU fully anticipates continued and ongoing demand for its on-campus, face-to-face academic programs, research opportunities, and vibrant residential student experience, all of which will support and depend upon the types of high-quality facilities outlined in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and September 8, 2020 Draft 2021 Campus Plan.

While AU’s efforts in response to COVID-19 have required so much from so many across all AU departments, it is important to note that the University’s effective responsiveness and demonstrated resiliency is in many ways grounded in the principles embodied in AU’s Strategic Plan – the same fundamental principles which inform many of the key components of the 2021 Campus Plan. AU’s strategic vision is rooted in an understanding of and intentional focus on the need to remain flexible and responsive to a wide range of complex factors that drive the continually changing dynamics of higher education in order to remain competitive and thrive as a vibrant educational institution. This priority on developing institutional agility across all AU units has uniquely positioned the university to effectively adapt and respond to the significant and evolving challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

C-002 COVID-19

Can AU extend the campus planning process by 6 months, like Wesley Seminary, to further engage the community (especially considering COVID-19)?

The events of the past several months associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have presented significant challenges across the nation and around the world. AU has responded with focused efforts to quickly transition instruction and operations to predominantly online platforms, striving to provide students with continuity of high-quality educational opportunities while addressing the social, emotional, financial, and related impacts caused by this sudden disruption in their AU experience. AU's work on the Campus Plan has actively advanced through these transitions. The Neighborhood Partnership Steering Committee and Working Groups have continued to meet on a regular basis and have provided substantive and instructive feedback on all key components of the Campus Plan. Special CLC Campus Plan-focused sessions were held in April and August 2020, and a Campus Planning 101 session was convened on May 19, 2020 to gather additional input from a wide range of institutional and community stakeholders. The Campus Plan website includes a variety of useful resources, including meeting presentations, reports, preliminary frameworks, the draft 2021 Campus Plan, and a Community Input Portal to facilitate online feedback. Responses to questions submitted through the Portal, as well as those posed at CLC meetings and other forums, are posted on the website along with a comprehensive list of FAQs. While AU actively navigates the current uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the university has, with the continued participation of neighborhood partners, thoughtfully and effectively advanced its work on the 2021 Campus Plan. The AU planning team is still on track with the timeline established last year and will continue to strive to meet the target of filing the 2021 Campus Plan by the end of 2020. See also FAQ How is the COVID-19 pandemic impacting the Campus Plan process and priorities? [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

C-003 COVID-19

Due to the uncertain times, can AU consider not racing through the campus plan; the strategic plan ends in 2023; other institutions (GU and Wesley) have postponed their campus planning process.

See response to Question C-002.

C-004 COVID-19

How will de-densifying affect the 67% mandate for on-campus student housing of undergraduates?

[JULY 2020 RESPONSE]: AU currently has approximately 2,300 on-campus residence hall units (including individual bedrooms within suites and apartments and single-room units that typically provide housing accommodations for two or three students). In accordance with AU's Reopening Plan, the university will only allow one student to occupy each on-campus residential unit, significantly reducing its on-campus housing capacity. As a result, it is anticipated that AU will not be able to meet the requirement that it make housing available for 67% of its full-time undergraduate students in the fall 2020 semester. At this time, AU does not know how many undergraduate students will return to campus for the fall 2020 semester. Accordingly, AU is not able to determine the actual percentage of housing that will be made available for its full-time undergraduate student population for the fall 2020 semester, although the university does expect that a meaningful portion of the undergraduate population will attend AU remotely and from outside of the Washington, DC area.

[09.10.2020 UPDATE]: On July 30, 2020, AU announced an adapted Reopening Plan based on evolving health conditions and government requirements. Under the revised Plan, all fall 2020 semester undergraduate and graduate courses are being offered online with no residential experience, with the exception of very limited emergency housing for students with demonstrated need.

C-005 COVID-19

Does AU need to go to the Zoning Commission regarding the residential housing, specifically regarding the type of modification?

On July 27, 2020, the DC Zoning Commission took emergency action to adopt the following text amendment (ZC Case No. 20-17) to the Zoning Regulations and authorized immediate publication of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking:

702.8 In response to the ongoing public health emergency, the following conditions in the orders approving Campus Plans and associated PUDs for universities shall be suspended for the 2020-2021 academic year to accommodate re-opening plans pursuant to Mayor’s Order 2020-067: (a) requirements to maintain a minimum number of on-campus beds or provide housing for a minimum percentage of students, (b) requirements that certain classes of students reside on campus, (c) limits on housing for certain classes of students to specific locations, and (d) limits on the use of classroom spaces for certain classes of students to specific locations.

The Zoning Commission also set the case down for public hearing.

C-006 COVID-19

Where will the upperclassmen go?

[JULY 2020 RESPONSE]: Many upperclassmen will remain at their permanent addresses and attend classes remotely. Those that return to Washington, DC may reside in hotels or other residential facilities that AU has made agreements with, or in private apartments and residences that students rent or lease on their own.

[09.10.2020 UPDATE]: On July 30, 2020, AU announced an adapted Reopening Plan based on evolving health conditions and government requirements. Under the revised Plan, all fall semester undergraduate and graduate courses are being offered online with no residential experience, with the exception of very limited emergency housing for students with demonstrated need.

C-007 COVID-19

Have the events of the recent weeks shifted the Campus Plan timeline?

See response to Question C-002.

C-008 COVID-19

In regard to residence hall occupancy Fall semester 2020 in respect to COVID-19, is your need to apply to the Zoning Commission for modification

(1) due to building use, i.e., freshman versus sophomore and/or the 67% housing availability requirement?

(2) Are your expected entering and returning undergraduate numbers too high that the existing housing will not meet the 67% housing availability?

(3) Is the modification request to increase the number of master leased off-campus housing allowed to meet the required 67% housing availability?

[JULY 2020 REPONSE]: AU is continuing to review, finalize and implement its reopening plans for Fall 2020. For health and safety reasons, and consistent with CDC, DC government/Department of Health, and American College Health Association (ACHA) guide guidance, AU will reduce density in its residence halls this fall:

(1) Housing assignments will be prioritized for freshmen and a portion of the sophomore class and as such, AU is seeking flexibility to potentially allow freshmen to live in Cassell Hall and on East Campus and freshmen and sophomores to reside in Nebraska Hall. The determination of whether additional relief will be required (e.g., from the 67% housing availability requirement) will depend upon how many undergraduate students return to campus this fall. That number is not yet known.

(2) Under normal operating circumstances, AU’s full housing capacity would meet the 67% requirement for the anticipated entering and returning Fall 2020 full-time undergraduate population. Relief that may be necessary in connection with the 67% housing requirement for Fall 2020 would be strictly related to the impacts of the COVID pandemic.

(3) AU does not anticipate seeking relief to increase the number of master leased off-campus housing allowed to meet the required 67% housing availability.

[09.10.2020 UPDATE]: On July 30, 2020, AU announced an adapted Reopening Plan based on evolving health conditions and government requirements. Under the revised Plan, all fall semester undergraduate and graduate courses are being offered online with no residential experience, with the exception of very limited emergency housing for students with demonstrated need.

C-009 COVID-19

When is AU filing a modification request with the Zoning Commission?

See response to Question C-005.

C-010 COVID-19

What type of modification – consequence or significance – will AU seek before the Zoning Commission?

See response to Question C-005.

C-011 COVID-19

How does AU de-densifying efforts affect the numbers of students residing on campus?

See response to Question C-004.

C-012 COVID-19

Can AU offer and require COVID-19 testing of students living in the neighborhoods (off campus)?

The AU Student Health Center has testing capabilities to test currently enrolled students. Additional information on AU's testing protocols can be found on our Coronavirus FAQ page.

C-013 COVID-20

With respect to the Fall Semester, what is AU doing to protect the students and neighbors around COVID-19, particularly with students coming from COVID-19 hotspots as school begins.

Any student coming to the District of Columbia from the high-risk states identified by DC Health are expected to quarantine for two weeks in accordance with Mayor Bowser's directive. AU expects that a significant portion of the student population will attend AU remotely and from outside of the Washington, DC area. All students that do return to Washington, DC are required to participate in an online health and safety training. Testing is also available for currently enrolled students at the AU Student Health Center.

C-014 COVID-21

Is the AU campus open to neighbors?

Effective August 24, all campus buildings can only be accessed with an AU ID card. To help reduce the spread of the Coronavirus, we are asking neighbors and guests to not visit the campus, including the track and tennis courts until further notice. However, if you must visit the campus, please wear a mask and practice social distancing.

D-001 Development Plan and Campus Character

Will all the various buildings on the development sites map in the framework document be built?

The Potential Development Sites Under Consideration graphic in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework identifies 14 potential development sites, however AU has specifically noted that not all potential residential sites identified on the graphic are required to meet AU's proposed target of 500 to 700 additional on-campus beds over the term of the Campus Plan. AU is seeking feedback from interested stakeholders with respect to the most appropriate locations for on-campus housing prior to finalizing the residential sites that will be included in the Campus Plan proposal. See also FAQ What new building projects are under consideration and how will they be funded? What are the project timelines?

[UPDATED 07.20.2020] : The updated June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework provides additional information about proposed development sites. Any projects included in AU’s 2021 Campus Plan proposal will not move forward until (1) the 2021 Campus Plan is approved by the Zoning Commission and (2) the specific project is further reviewed and approved by the Zoning Commission through the separate further processing process. When development projects are pursued in the future, the university will communicate with the AU community and neighbors through a variety of channels, including e-mail updates, public meetings, the Community Liaison Committee (CLC), the AU Neighborhood Partnership, the AU Community Relations newsletter, and direct discussions with neighborhood organizations.

[UPDATED 09.10.2020]: The September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan provides additional information about proposed development sites.

D-002 Development Plan and Campus Character

Can AU provide more insight on its needs? It is difficult to know how the numbers impact the end result.

As noted in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework , June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and September 8, 2020 Draft 2021 Campus Plan, consistent with AU's intent to maintain enrollment within the cap established in 2011 (when adjusted to reflect the 2016 Zoning Regulations methodology), proposed new development is not aimed at accommodating increases in approved enrollment levels, but rather providing the types of high-quality facilities that are required to further the university’s academic and research missions, balanced with the need to maximize its limited financial resources. Reflecting this measured and strategic approach, potential new development opportunities included in the 2021 Campus Plan are intended to total significantly less than the 892,000 square feet of new gross floor area (GFA) proposed in the 2011 Campus Plan. The 2021 Campus Plan will reinforce and embody AU’s culture of sustainability and commitment to promoting forward-thinking technologies and industry-leading practices in facility design, construction and operation, including repurposing existing facilities and strategic development of important campus sites, helping to strengthen and invigorate a student-centered living and learning campus experience. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

D-003 Development Plan and Campus Character

Which building sites are AU's priorities?

The March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework outlines potential facilities projects that may be pursued by the university over the next ten years. Preliminary planning and evaluation are underway for one of the potential projects identified in the framework: the proposed Center for Athletic Performance (CAP). At this time, no other potential development sites under consideration (as shown in Exhibit A-1 and A-2 of the Preliminary 2021 Campus Plan Framework) are underway. Please note that as with all information included in the framework, potential sites for new facilities are preliminary and have not yet been finalized. In addition, as specifically noted in the framework, not all housing projects currently identified in Exhibit A-1 and A-2 would need to be developed to meet AU’s anticipated target of 500 to 700 beds of additional student housing over the term of the Plan. AU is seeking feedback from interested stakeholders with respect to the most appropriate locations for on-campus housing prior to finalizing the housing sites that will be included in the 2021 Campus Plan proposal. Any potential development sites included in the approved Campus Plan will also be subject to a separate Zoning Commission "further processing" review and approval process, including a full public hearing, prior to the development of the site. The updated June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan provides additional information on proposed development sites, including identifying priority housing sites based on feedback received during the planning process. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

D-004 Development Plan and Campus Character

What is AU's vision for the tunnel under Bender Arena?

As outlined in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU is exploring circulation concepts which would help reduce pedestrian/vehicle conflicts and create a more pedestrian-friendly campus environment, including improving conditions at the tunnel under Bender Arena. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

D-005 Development Plan and Campus Character

What are AU's plans for development around Wisconsin Avenue, Connecticut Avenue, and Spring Valley?

The March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan do not include any major new development projects for Tenley Campus, Spring Valley Building, 4200 Wisconsin Avenue and 3201 New Mexico Avenue. Renovation projects and minor modifications to address accessibility and related issues may be pursued over the term of the Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

D-006 Development Plan and Campus Character

Will the Mary Graydon be fully renovated this time?

The March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan outline AU's strong and purposeful emphasis on on-campus life, focusing on efforts to provide attractive and functional spaces that encourage students to spend more time on campus during their years at AU. A key component in this effort is reinvigorating Mary Graydon Center as a campus hub for a myriad of student-focused activities. (e.g., Center for Student Involvement, Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Academic Support & Access Center, Center for Community Engagement & Services, and all student organizations), as well as repurposing existing and developing new space to accommodate integrated student health and wellness programs, particularly those focused on supporting students' mental health (including Counseling Services, Health Promotion & Advocacy, and expanded fitness programs). [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

D-007 Development Plan and Campus Character

How will it [Mary Graydon Center] be replaced during renovations?

The university will identify adequate swing space to accommodate the displaced space requirements during the renovation process.

D-008 Development Plan and Campus Character

How would a potential downtown campus be integrated into the Campus Plan?

AU has identified lifelong-learning initiatives, including specially-designed, high-quality programs that utilize off-campus locations (e.g., downtown DC or other metro DC locations) as an area targeted for growth. A downtown location would not be considered as part of this Campus Plan, as university uses in high-density commercial areas are not subject to the District's Campus Plan regulations.

D-009 Development Plan and Campus Character

Would students studying at the downtown campus live on AU’s main campus?

Although it is early in the university's thinking about a downtown location, the idea is focused more on graduate education and life-long learning opportunities targeted primarily at working professionals for whom a downtown location is more convenient than AU's main campus. The university does not anticipate a residential component for this programming.

D-010 Development Plan and Campus Character

How tall will the film tower be, and will it have PA speakers?

The proposed film tower will be approximately 15 - 20 feet tall. It will not be equipped with PA speakers.

D-011 Development Plan and Campus Character

What areas are being designated as green spaces for public gathering?

AU prides itself on the campus landscape and green space elements that are distinctive to its urban campus -- an accredited and award-winning arboretum that supports over 3,800 trees, more than 385 species and varieties of woody plants, and countless perennials, annuals, bulbs, and ornamental grasses. Section 4.2.3 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan specifically addresses campus landscape and open spaces, including areas designed for outdoor gathering. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

D-012 Development Plan and Campus Character

Has AU's President put a stop on all new construction?

AU has put a hold on new construction projects other than completion of the Hall of Science. This incudes the planned renovation of 3244 Nebraska Avenue, NW, which has been put on hold until further notice.

D-013 Development Plan and Campus Character

How much will the proposed sound wall near Jacobs Field reduce noise in the immediate neighborhood? Is the University designing the wall to accomplish any particular performance standards or specific objectives for reducing noise? If so, what are those standards and objectives?

The proposed sound wall would be designed to appropriately mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with noise from the use of Jacobs Field. Specific details regarding the proposed sound wall would be addressed during the further processing review and approval process required prior to the construction of the wall.

D-014 Development Plan and Campus Character

Does the University plan to impose any limits on the future sources, volume, and frequency of noise from Jacob's Field (even if a wall is built to mitigate some of the sound) to make sure that the noise does not exceed acceptable levels? If so, what limits does the University plan to propose as part of the next Campus Plan?

Please see proposed conditions of approval 14 -20 in Section 6 of the September 8, 2020 Draft 2021 Campus Plan.

D-015 Development Plan and Campus Character

There are existing conditions regarding the operation of Jacob's Field. As part of its Campus Plan is the University going to ask to change the conditions relative to usage and amplified sound on the field?

Please see proposed conditions of approval 14 -20 in Section 6 of the September 8, 2020 Draft 2021 Campus Plan.

D-016 Development Plan and Campus Character

Regarding the proposed new telescoping tower on Jacob's Field adjacent to the property line, what is the purpose, frequency of use and intended function of the tower? Will any noise be generated by or emanate from the tower and will it have any lights?

The proposed filming tower is anticipated to be approximately 15 - 20 feet tall (similar in height to the press area that is currently in place) with stairs that lead to an approximately 6-foot by 10-foot platform. The facility would allow AU to have a more permanent, safe structure to film field hockey and women’s lacrosse events. No amplified sound or lights would be associated with the filming tower.

E-001 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

What about the trends in higher education over the next decade given the rapidly changing environment in education? What kind of teaching facilities does AU need?

These issues are discussed Section 3 and Section 4 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan and were also addressed by the AU Provost in a “Future Trends in Higher Education Enrollment” presentation which is posted on the 2021 Campus Plan website. See also FAQ How is AU managing enrollment under the new Campus Plan? Is the student population going to increase? and How is AU’s approach to enrollment management different under the 2011 and 2021 Campus Plans? [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-002 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Will the School of Education be moving to the Spring Valley building, and how many students are enrolled in the School of Education?

The School of Education is currently housed in the Spring Valley Building. There is a possibility that the school will be relocated during the term of the Campus Plan to a facility identified for academic/administrative use, but AU has not made any firm decisions at this time. In Fall 2019, the School of Education enrolled a total of 198 undergraduate and graduate students.

E-003 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

How many students attend classes in the Spring Valley building?

During Fall 2019, 1,245 students attended classes in the Spring Valley Building.

E-004 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

What types of programs (i.e. undergraduate or graduate) are being considered for the move [to Tenley Campus]?

Given that the current and anticipated enrollment of the Washington College of Law is substantially less than the existing enrollment cap of 2,000 students, as outlined in Section 4.1 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan AU will seek flexibility to allow students enrolled in other academic programs, including those that present opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration, to attend classes at the Tenley Campus subject to the existing 2,000 student cap. No decisions regarding specific programs to include at the Tenley Campus have been made at this time. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-005 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

How will moving non-law school students to the Tenleytown campus affect the law school enrollment cap?

No change is contemplated to the number of students (2,000) permitted to be enrolled at the Tenley Campus. Any students attending classes at the Tenley Campus, including Washington College of Law students and students enrolled in any other AU program, would be included in the 2,000 student cap.

E-006 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Are AU’s enrollment numbers holding steady?

AU's enrollment has remained relatively consistent over the term of the 2011 Campus Plan and well under the enrollment cap established by the 2011 Campus Plan Order of Approval. As detailed in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and Section 4.1 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU has proposed a student enrollment cap that is lower than the cap established in the 2011 Campus Plan, when adjusted to reflect the student count methodology set forth in the city’s updated zoning regulations. See also FAQ How is AU managing enrollment under the new Campus Plan? Is the student population going to increase? and How is AU’s approach to enrollment management different under the 2011 and 2021 Campus Plans? [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-007 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Do the new enrollment numbers come from a different way of measuring?

The enrollment numbers in the 2021 Campus Plan will reflect a modified student count methodology as a result of the 2016 Zoning Regulations, which impact the way AU and other universities throughout the District must count students. For AU, this new approach will expand the scope of students included in the enrollment count – the new regulations require that more types of students and students in a greater number of locations be counted. As a result of this change in the new governing regulations, the student count number under the new regulations will increase by 6.61%, even though the count represents the same student population reported under the 2011 Campus Plan methodology. See also FAQ How is AU managing enrollment under the new Campus Plan? Is the student population going to increase? and How is AU’s approach to enrollment management different under the 2011 and 2021 Campus Plans?

E-008 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

I am seeking current enrollment data broken down by student categories (grad, undergrad, and other categories used by AU to designate students).

AU’s fall 2019 enrollment data was shared with the CLC at its December 2019 meeting. Specifically, AU reported the following information:

Enrollment:
Main Campus: 10,460 (6,907 undergraduate; 2,427 graduate; 1,126 other)
Washington College of Law: 1,341
Total: 11,801
AU Total Enrollment Cap: 13,600
Washington College of Law Cap: 2,000

Housing:
On campus capacity: 4,152
Triples: 330
AU-provided off campus: 200
Total beds available: 4,682
Full-time undergraduate enrollment: 6,907
Full-time undergraduate housing capacity: 68%

E-009 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

I am seeking the same [enrollment] information for your projected numbers over the ten year term of the next Campus Plan. This is information that AU has always been willing to provide to residents as part of the campus planning process in previous campus plan cycles – even before building projects were identified – and it is information that AU is required to include in its formal submission under the current zoning regulations. Is it your plan to wait until then to provide the community with this enrollment data and projections?

Current (Fall 2019) enrollment data, as well as a proposed enrollment cap of 14,499 students – which reflects a strategic and measured approach to enrollment growth within the student cap established in 2011, when adjusted to reflect the revised student count methodology established by the 2016 Zoning Regulations – was included in the Preliminary 2021 Campus Plan Framework shared with the CLC on March 3, 2020 and posted on the Campus Plan website on March 4, 2020. As detailed in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and Section 4.1 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, after extensive discussion, review, and collaboration, the university has modified its approach to the enrollment cap for the 2021 Campus Plan to reflect the methodology favored by several community members of the Neighborhood Partnership and other neighborhood stakeholders engaged in the planning process. As a result, the revised proposed 2021 Campus Plan enrollment cap of 14,380, which would be in effect through 2031, is lower than the student enrollment cap established in the 2011 Campus Plan, when adjusted for the new methodology for counting students mandated under the 2016 Zoning Regulations.

This student count information is consistent with Subtitle Z, Section 302.10(d) of the 2016 Zoning Regulations which requires that the University’s application for a Campus Plan include a “Student count for every student on campus, including full-time, part-time, foreign, certificate/non-degree, single course, night programs, and executive program students (if applicable)”.

The profile of students entering degree-seeking, certificate, and continuing education programs and the demand for these programs are in rapid flux, influenced by shifts in demographics as well as economic and market forces that impact the notion of a “traditional” student. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, online education programs were experiencing dramatic growth nationwide (and globally) and actively transforming the landscape of higher education. Consistent with the priorities set forth in AU’s Strategic Plan, the university has made intentional strides to adapt to these changes and provide a range of dynamic lifetime learning opportunities utilizing traditional face-to-face as well as leading-edge online platforms. While these changes can present challenges for long-range institutional planning and traditional methods of enrollment management, they also present opportunities for universities that can remain flexible to respond to emerging trends and offer unique programs that will attract and retain high-quality students. In order to remain competitive and thrive as a vibrant educational institution in the nation’s capital, AU is focused on the need to maintain this responsive flexibility and institutional agility; this is even more important now, as AU effectively navigates the short-, medium- and long-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Owing to this fluidity of market conditions throughout higher education, enrollment projections made ten years ago as part of the Campus Plan 2011 process did not materialize as AU had anticipated. Specifically, the university’s stated goal of enrolling 1,000 additional graduate students over the term of the 2011 Campus Plan was not met. While undergraduate enrollment increased at a measured pace over that period of time, the overall number of enrolled students remained relatively consistent and well below the approved enrollment cap.

In light of all of the foregoing, AU has taken a different approach to addressing the impact of student enrollment over the term of the 2021 Campus Plan; specifically, one focused around managing impacts rather than attempting to project specific enrollment figures around defined programs. That being said, AU has provided directional guidance in terms of anticipated undergraduate, graduate, and online program growth. Specifically, it is AU’s intent that traditional full-time undergraduate enrollment will likely remain close to current levels, owing to a range of factors including constraints associated with facilities, the services needed to support additional undergraduate students, as well as the size of current and anticipated future applicant pools. As was the case in the 2011 Campus Plan, AU will endeavor to increase on-campus enrollment in face-to-face graduate programs, subject to the limitations of the proposed overall enrollment cap. Areas targeted for anticipated growth include online instruction and lifelong learning initiatives, which include specially-designed, high-quality programs that utilize off-campus locations (e.g., downtown DC or other sites throughout the metro region) and do not bring students to the AU campus for their coursework.

Importantly, as part of the 2021 Campus Plan, AU will continue its dedicated efforts to work collaboratively with members of the community through the AU Neighborhood Partnership to effectively address impacts associated with AU students on the neighborhoods surrounding campus. While the scope of the reported impacts is relatively small compared with other universities in DC, AU is firmly committed to a results-oriented approach to reduce these impacts further, by revising student policies to more explicitly reference standards for off-campus living; providing additional on-campus housing in marketable unit configurations to encourage more students to remain on campus beyond their freshman year and reduce the number of undergraduates living in the neighborhoods surrounding campus and enhancing on-campus opportunities for student activities and social engagement; and evaluating programs and efforts over the term of the Campus Plan to ensure their efficacy.

AU’s commitment to the focused implementation of these efforts, along with continued collaboration with its neighborhood partners, will allow AU to maintain the flexibility necessary to continue to compete as an leading university in the nation’s capital while at the same time respecting and enhancing the quality of life of those who live within the neighborhoods surrounding campus by actively addressing and effectively minimizing adverse impacts. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-010 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Can AU share the complete enrollment data with everyone?

Enrollment data associated with the 2021 Campus Plan is provided in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and Section 4.1 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. See also FAQ How is AU managing enrollment under the new Campus Plan? Is the student population going to increase? and How is AU’s approach to enrollment management different under the 2011 and 2021 Campus Plans? [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-011 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Can AU provide more detailed enrollment information to justify an increase in the enrollment cap?

AU is not seeking to increase the enrollment cap, when adjusted to reflect the revised student count methodology established by the 2016 Zoning Regulations. Initially, in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, AU proposed to maintain the existing enrollment cap, when adjusted to reflect the revised methodology. After extensive discussion, review, and collaboration, the university has modified its approach to the enrollment cap for the 2021 Campus Plan to reflect the methodology favored by several community members of the Neighborhood Partnership and other neighborhood stakeholders engaged in the planning process. As a result, as detailed in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and Section 4.1 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, the university proposed a revised 2021 Campus Plan enrollment cap of 14,380. This proposed cap, which would be in effect through 2031, is lower than the student enrollment cap established in the 2011 Campus Plan, when adjusted for the new methodology for counting students mandated under the 2016 Zoning Regulations. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-012 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Who comprises the 780 students who were not previously counted in the 2011 Campus Plan?

The 780 students counted under the 2016 Zoning Regulations that were not counted in the 2011 Campus Plan primarily include students enrolled in classes at the additional AU properties which will now be included in the Campus Plan pursuant to the 2016 Zoning Regulations (4801 Massachusetts Avenue, 4200 Wisconsin Avenue, and 3201 New Mexico Avenue), as well as a relatively small number of students enrolled in non-degree/non-credit classes at the main campus. See graphic for more details: Fall 2019 Student Count Methodologies.

E-013 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

How is AU factoring the Free College Movement and COVID-19 into the current campus plan?

AU is deeply attuned to college affordability as reflected in its five-year Strategic Plan and meets the full demonstrated need of all of its admitted students. The events of the past several months associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have presented unprecedented challenges across the nation and around the world. Certainly the outcomes of the experience will shape decision-making, inform policy decisions, and influence operational models across all levels of education well into the future. Yet even before COVID-19 unexpectedly precipitated the rapid transition to university-wide online learning, AU identified the development of leading-edge online programming as a core component of the university’s future vision. At the same time, AU fully anticipates continued and ongoing demand for its on-campus, face-to-face academic programs, research opportunities, and vibrant residential student experience that will support and depend upon the types of high-quality facilities – at a scale of development intended to be significantly reduced from the 2011 Campus Plan – outlined in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. See also FAQ How is the COVID-19 pandemic impacting the Campus Plan process and priorities? [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-014 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

What was the enrollment cap in 2011?

Condition #3 of the 2011 Campus Plan Order of Approval (Zoning Commission Order No. 11-07) states that "student enrollment (headcount) shall not exceed 13,600 students, including any matriculated student enrolled in at least one class in any property included in the 2011 Plan".

E-015 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Do you have an enrollment cap and a separate cap for people living off campus? Why not increase the 67% cap instead of building more space?

Condition #3 of the 2011 Campus Plan Order of Approval (Zoning Commission Order No. 11-07) states that "student enrollment (headcount) shall not exceed 13,600 students, including any matriculated student enrolled in at least one class in any property included in the 2011 Plan". There is not a separate cap for students living off-campus. The University is also required to maintain a supply of housing sufficient to make housing available for 67% of all full-time undergraduates. AU has proposed to maintain this 67% standard in the 2021 Campus Plan along with a focus on prioritizing renovations to existing housing inventory and proposing new facilities that provide unit configurations and amenities that respond to student preferences. As part of this effort, AU will support the creation of learning communities, affinity housing and other community-oriented housing experiences to encourage more upper-class students to live on campus beyond their freshman year.

E-016 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Is AU required to address projected financial and enrollment issues related to COVID-19 in the campus plan?

There is no regulatory requirement to specifically address projected financial and enrollment issues related to COVID-19 in the Campus Plan. While AU is actively navigating the current uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, the university continues to plan for the long term, and the 2021 Campus Plan will reflect AU's planning priorities for the ten-year term of the Plan.

E-017 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

What are the zoning commission’s specific requirements for raising enrollment?

Information regarding the DC Zoning Commission's regulations regarding Campus Plans can be reviewed at https://dcoz.dc.gov/page/campus-plan-0.

E-018 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

How are Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) students counted?

While a valued institutional partner, OLLI is an independent organization from AU. As such, OLLI students are not included in the AU student population because they are not AU students.

E-019 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

How will the AU acceptance rate remain low with an increased enrollment cap?

AU is not seeking to increase the enrollment cap, when adjusted to reflect the revised student count methodology established by the 2016 Zoning Regulations. Initially, in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, AU proposed to maintain the existing enrollment cap, when adjusted to reflect the revised methodology. After extensive discussion, review, and collaboration, the university has modified its approach to the enrollment cap for the 2021 Campus Plan to reflect the methodology favored by several community members of the Neighborhood Partnership and other neighborhood stakeholders engaged in the planning process. As a result, the revised proposed 2021 Campus Plan enrollment cap of 14,380, which would be in effect through 2031, is lower than the student enrollment cap established in the 2011 Campus Plan, when adjusted for the new methodology for counting students mandated under the 2016 Zoning Regulations. The proposed enrollment cap is not expected to impact the university's admit rate.

E-020 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Does AU need to justify the number of potential building sites to the zoning commission based on enrollment?

As articulated in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, proposed new campus development is not aimed at accommodating increases in approved enrollment levels, but rather providing the types of high-quality facilities that are required to further the university's academic and research missions, balanced with the need to maximize the university's limited financial resources. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-021 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

How does greater enrollment increase the potential for impact on the surrounding communities?

AU is taking a deliberate and intentional approach to addressing student enrollment over the term of the 2021 Campus Plan, focused around effectively managing impacts. Specifically, AU has more clearly articulated and expanded is commitments to work collaboratively with members of the community through the AU Neighborhood Partnership to effectively address impacts associated with AU students on the neighborhoods surrounding campus. While the scope of the reported impacts is relatively small compared with other universities in DC, AU is firmly committed to a results-oriented approach to reduce these impacts further, by revising student policies to more explicitly reference standards for off-campus living; providing additional on-campus housing in marketable unit configurations to encourage more students to remain on campus beyond their freshman year and reduce the number of undergraduates living in the neighborhoods surrounding campus; enhancing on-campus opportunities for student activities and social engagement; and evaluating programs and efforts over the term of the Campus Plan to ensure their efficacy.

E-022 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Are there enrollment figures or plans specific to the Spring Valley building? Will AU’s growth in the building will impact OLLI’s future?

AU intends to continue using The Spring Valley Building over the term of the Campus Plan for administrative and academic purposes. The priorities set forth in the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan do not have a direct impact on OLLI; space and programs needs of AU and OLLI at the Spring Valley Building will continue to be evaluated over time. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-023 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Are universities eliminating non-compete rules in their codes of ethics to attract students to their enrollment?

AU is aligning with the new guidelines set forth by the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC).

E-024 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Now that universities are offering incentives to attend their schools, can students applying to other universities change their minds?

Under the current National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) guidelines, schools can continue to recruit students even if they have committed to other institutions.

E-025 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Georgetown University has a cap on its undergraduate enrollment. Why is AU opposed to a cap on its undergraduate enrollment?

The university is taking a strategic and measured approach to enrollment management under the new Campus Plan, proposing to lower the on-campus student enrollment cap established in the 2011 Campus Plan, when adjusted to reflect the student count methodology set forth in the city’s updated zoning regulations. AU agreed to modify its initial position of maintaining the existing cap (when adjusted for the new regulations) in response to extensive discussion and engagement with its neighborhood partners.

AU’s approach is shaped by a wide range of factors that are impacting the changing dynamics of enrollment management throughout higher education. The profile of students entering degree-seeking, certificate, and continuing education programs and the demand for these programs are in rapid flux, influenced by shifts in demographics as well as economic and market forces that impact the notion of a “traditional” student. While these rapidly changing conditions can present challenges for long-range institutional planning and traditional methods of enrollment management, they also present opportunities for universities that can remain flexible to respond to emerging trends and offer unique programs that will attract and retain high-quality students. In order to remain competitive and thrive as a vibrant educational institution in the nation’s capital, AU is focused on the need to maintain this responsive flexibility and institutional agility; this is even more important now, as AU effectively navigates the short-, medium-, and long-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Accordingly, AU has taken a different approach to addressing the impact of student enrollment over the term of the 2021 Campus Plan; specifically, one focused around managing impacts rather than attempting to project specific enrollment figures around defined programs. Importantly, as part of the 2021 Campus Plan, AU will continue its dedicated efforts to work collaboratively with members of the community through the AU Neighborhood Partnership to effectively address impacts associated with AU students on the neighborhoods surrounding campus. While the scope of the reported impacts is relatively small compared with other universities in DC, AU is firmly committed to a results-oriented approach to reduce these impacts further, by revising student policies to more explicitly reference standards for off-campus living; providing additional on-campus housing in marketable unit configurations to encourage more students to remain on campus beyond their freshman year and reduce the number of undergraduates living in the neighborhoods surrounding campus; enhancing on-campus opportunities for student activities and social engagement; and evaluating programs and efforts over the term of the Campus Plan to ensure their efficacy.

AU’s commitment to the focused implementation of these efforts, along with continued collaboration with neighborhood partners, will allow AU to maintain the flexibility necessary to continue to compete as an leading university in the nation’s capital while at the same time respecting and enhancing the quality of life of those who live within the neighborhoods surrounding campus by actively addressing and effectively minimizing adverse impacts.

E-026 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

What will AU’s enrollment look like for Fall 2020?

AU's fall 2020 enrollment has not yet been finalized; additional details regarding fall enrollment will be provided to the CLC at its December 2020 meeting consistent with prior years.

E-027 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Can AU outline the enrollment numbers more clearly by providing a chart?

Enrollment numbers for Fall 2019 are illustrated in bar chart format and in an infographic in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework.

E-028 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

What is the current student breakdown across AU’s main campus and the Washington College of Law?

Fall 2019 enrollment figures reported to the CLC in December 2019 reflected 10,460 students at the Main Campus and 1,341 students at Washington College of Law.

E-029 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Is AU adding another 1,800 students to the cap?

No. As detailed in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU is proposing to adjust the 2011 Campus Plan enrollment cap (13,800) to reflect the impact of the 2016 Zoning Regulations on how students are counted under the 2021 Campus Plan. AU's proposed 2021 Campus Plan cap (14,380) is lower than the 2011 Plan cap when adjusted for the changes mandated by the new Zoning Regulations. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-030 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Does AU have space in the cap for 1,800 students? Will those students live on-campus or off-campus?

As detailed in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, current enrollment across all Campus Plan properties for Fall 2019 totaled 12,581 students. The proposed cap is 14,380 students, which is lower than the cap approved in the 2011 Campus Plan when adjusted to reflect the changes mandated by the new Zoning Regulations with respect to how students will be counted. The university has proposed to add between 500 - 700 beds of on-campus housing over the term of the 2021 Campus Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

E-031 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

How many of AU's undergraduate students would be taking classes on Tenleytown campus?

AU has proposed to allow students from programs other than the Washington College of Law (WCL) to attend classes at the Tenley Campus, up to the existing cap of 2,000 students.

E-032 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Are the AU enrollment projections required for the Zoning Commission? And if so, are they binding?

Enrollment projections are not required pursuant to the DC Zoning Regulations.

E-033 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Is the 2,000 student enrollment cap interpreted as a cap on the Washington College of Law (WCL) or the Tenley Campus?

The 2011 Campus Plan Order provides for a maximum enrollment at the Tenley Campus of 2,000 students and describes enrollment at the Tenley Campus as "all matriculated students at the Washington College of Law registered for a regular academic program, whether full-time or part-time". Given that the current and anticipated enrollment of the Washington College of Law is substantially less than the existing Tenley Campus enrollment cap, the 2021 Campus Plan will seek flexibility to allow students enrolled in other academic programs, including those that present opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration, to attend classes at the Tenley Campus subject to the existing 2,000 student cap.

E-034 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Can AU Business School students take classes at the Washington College of Law, during COVID 19?

All classes are being conducted online in Fall 2020.

H-001 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

How is AU's contract for apartments at The Frequency Apartments impacted by the mayor's affordable housing initiative. Does this arrangement take units off the housing market?

American University does not lease any affordable housing units at the Frequency. While AU has proposed to maintain an inventory of off-campus master leased beds to provide AU students with housing alternatives that meet their desire to live in vibrant locations close to public transportation and retail amenities without adversely impacting the residential neighborhoods surrounding campus, a key goal of the 2021 Campus Plan is to provide additional on-campus housing in marketable unit configurations to encourage more students to remain on campus beyond their freshman year and reduce the number of undergraduates living in the neighborhoods surrounding campus. See also FAQ How will student housing be impacted on and around campus?

H-002 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Does "bringing students back on to campus" mean mandating students to live on campus?

The September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan does not propose a student housing mandate. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

H-003 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Can CLC members get the current breakdown of student housing numbers?

The current AU on-campus student housing capacity by residence hall is as follows: Anderson Hall - 768 beds; Cassell Hall - 360 beds; Centennial Hall - 402 beds; Clark Hall - 60 beds; Constitution Hall - 279 beds; Duber Hall (formerly Congressional Hall) - 136 beds; Federal Hall - 175 beds; Hughes Hall - 313 beds; Leonard Hall - 371 beds; Letts Hall - 604 beds; McDowell Hall - 370 beds; Nebraska Hall - 270 beds; Roper Hall - 59 beds; for a total bed capacity of 4,167. 15 of those beds are allocated for full-time staff, leaving a remaining bed capacity of 4,152. The unit configurations of many of these existing residence halls do not provide the types of housing desired by upperclass students; accordingly, the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan outlines AU's proposal to increase on-campus housing inventory, allowing the flexibility to update certain existing residence halls into configurations that align with student preferences. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

H-004 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

How many students live on campus?

In Fall 2019, 4,117 students lived in on-campus university housing.

H-005 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Does AU plan to require students to live on campus, and what anticipated changes are expected at Tenleytown?

AU students are not required to live on campus, however AU is required under the 2011 Campus Plan to make housing available for 67% of all full-time undergraduate students. The March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan carry forward the 67% housing requirement. Regarding the Tenley Campus, AU is not proposing any significant new development, however improvements to Dunblane House to address accessibility requirements and accommodate academic and administrative needs are contemplated. In addition, given that the current and anticipated enrollment of the Washington College of Law is substantially less than the existing enrollment cap of 2,000 students, AU will seek flexibility to allow students enrolled in other academic programs, including those that present opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration, to attend classes at the Tenley Campus, subject to the existing 2,000 student cap. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

H-006 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

What are the numbers of available undergraduate “beds” on campus and what are the costs associated with this housing?

AU currently maintains an inventory of 4,152 beds of on-campus student housing; this does not include the 200 master leased beds at the Frequency in Tenleytown. Housing rates can be reviewed at https://www.american.edu/ocl/housing/housing-rates.cfm.

H-007 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

How successful has AU been in achieving the goal of 67% on-campus residency? If AU has not achieved this goal, why not and what can be done to achieve the goal?

Since the completion of the residence halls (Duber Hall, Constitution Hall, and Federal Hall) on East Campus, AU has consistently met the Campus Plan requirement that the university provide a supply of housing for 67% of the full-time undergraduate student population.

H-008 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Will AU provide additional graduate student housing?

As discussed in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU is exploring the possibility of providing graduate student housing on campus. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

H-009 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

What are the impacts of bringing off-campus students back on-campus?

AU has established a target of developing an additional 500 - 700 beds of on-campus housing over the term of the Campus Plan. This additional on-campus housing capacity would support the university's goal of encouraging more students to live on campus after their freshman year; allow AU the necessary flexibility in inventory to renovate existing residence halls over time to make less desirable -- and more densely populated -- facilities more competitive in unit type and configuration; and would also provide AU the opportunity to offer on-campus graduate student housing. Along with other focused and dedicated efforts, this approach will support AU's commitment to effectively manage and mitigate the impact of students on the residential communities surrounding campus.

H-010 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Is AU trying to eliminate triple dorms?

While AU will not be offering triples during the 2020-21 academic year as a result of the university's de-densification of campus in response to COVID-19, AU does intend to continue to offer triples over the term of the 2021 Campus Plan.

H-011 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Where do the majority of AU students currently live?

In Fall 2019, AU housed a majority of its full-time undergraduate student population on campus.

H-012 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

What is the total amount of people that will be on-campus, or living in our neighborhoods?

[JULY 2020 RESPONSE]: As part of AU's fall 2020 ReOpen Plan, AU will only allow one student to occupy each on-campus residential unit, reducing the university's on-campus housing capacity to approximately 2,300 students. At this time, AU does not know how many undergraduate students will return to campus for the fall 2020 semester, although the university does expect that a meaningful portion of the undergraduate population will attend AU remotely and from outside of the Washington, DC area.

[09.10.2020 UPDATE] On July 30, 2020, AU announced an adapted Reopening Plan based on evolving health conditions and government requirements. Under the revised Plan, all fall semester undergraduate and graduate courses are being offered online with no residential experience, with the exception of very limited emergency housing for students with demonstrated need. Also see response to Question H-015.

H-013 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

What type of student life use is AU planning on East Campus?

Additional student life uses at East Campus could include retail dining and other related uses and activities to help strengthen and support student life on campus. Details on proposed student life uses will be addressed as part of the further processing for each Campus Plan development project, including proposed development on East Campus.

H-014 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

AU Fall 2019 enrollment totaled 11,801 students, including 10,460 on the main campus (6,907 undergrads, 2,427 graduate students and 1,126 labeled "other") and 1,341 at the Washington College of Law. In addition there were 780 students at 3 other off- site locations.

How many students in each of the above categories lived off campus and how many lived on campus in the fall of 2019?

In the fall of 2019, there were a total of 4,117 students living on campus. Of those, 3,647 were full time undergraduate students. Seven were graduate students and one was a Washington College of Law student. The remaining 462 students were classified as “Other” (including students not enrolled as full-time undergraduates and those in non-degree-seeking programs), specifically including students enrolled in the following programs: Washington Mentorship (192), International Accelerator Program (143), Washington Semester Program (74), AU Abroad (52), and Dual Degree SIS (1).

In the fall of 2019, there were a total of 2,685 students living in the 20016 or 20008 zip codes. Of those, 1,747 were full-time undergraduate students, 504 were graduate students, 248 were Washington College of Law Students and 186 were classified as “Other”.

H-015 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

How will COVID -19 affect the number of students living on or off campus based on AU's policy for re-opening in the fall of 2020?

On July 30, 2020, AU announced an adapted Reopening Plan based on evolving health conditions and government requirements. Under the revised Plan, all fall undergraduate and graduate courses are being offered online with no residential experience, with the exception of very limited emergency housing for students with demonstrated need.

As of September 4, 2020, 29 students reside in university provided emergency housing. 2,748 students are living off campus in the 20016 and 20008 zip codes. Of those, 1,796 are full time undergraduate students, 461 are graduate students, 313 are Washington College of Law Students, and 178 students are classified as “Other”. [UPDATED 9.10.2020]

H-016 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Can AU clarify secondary housing sites.

As outlined in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU has indicated a desire to add approximately 500 beds of on-campus student housing over the term of the Campus Plan. Sites 2 and 4 on West Campus would together meet this target, and have been identified as Primary Priority Residential Sites. As detailed more fully in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, these two new residence halls, along with the proposed Center for Athletic Performance (CAP) and consolidated student health and wellness facilities, would effectively transform an underutilized area of campus into a vibrant athletic, residential and campus life village, while maintaining a substantial distance and appropriate buffers from neighboring residential properties. While it is AU’s desired intent to maintain at least 200 master leased beds off-campus – to meet the needs of students who desire to live in vibrant commercial locations close to public transportation and retail amenities, without adversely impacting residential neighborhoods surrounding campus – AU has noted throughout the planning process that in the event the current 200 off-campus master leased beds are no longer counted toward the 67% housing requirement, the university’s target for additional on-campus beds would increase accordingly, up to approximately 700 total beds. The Secondary Priority Residential Sites identified in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, including Site 12 and the Beeghly Building (if converted to residential use), would provide for this additional capacity in the event the master leased beds cannot be counted toward the housing requirement, are not available, or if additional housing capacity is otherwise necessary over the term of the Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

H-017 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Are there plans to take existing dorms off-service?

In the event Site 11 and/or site 12 as described more fully in Section 4 of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan are developed over the term of the Campus Plan, the student housing capacity at Clark Hall (60 beds) and Roper Hall (59 beds) would be taken out of service. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

H-018 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

AU Fall 2019 enrollment totaled 11,801 students including 10,460 on the main campus (6,907 undergrads, 2,427 graduate students and 1,126 labeled "other") and 1,341 at the Washington College of Law. In addition, there were 780 students at 3 other off- site locations.

How many students in each of the above categories lived off campus and how many lived on campus in the fall of 2019?

This question is answered in H-014.

H-019 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

How will COVID -19 affect the number of students living on or off campus based on AU's policy for re-opening in the fall of 2020?

This question is answered in H-015.

N-001 Off-Campus and Neighborhood Quality of Life

How does the campus plan address off-campus housing under master leases?

It is AU's desired intent to maintain at least 200 master leased beds off campus, to meet the needs of students who desire to live in vibrant commercial locations close to public transportation and retail amenities, without adversely impacting residential neighborhoods surrounding campus. Currently these 200 master leased beds count toward the university's 67% housing requirement; AU proposes that this approach be maintained in the 2021 Campus Plan. The Campus Plan proposes to enhance its policies and implement robust engagement with students that choose to live off-campus to equip them to be responsible members of the community and promote positive relationships between students and their neighbors.

N-002 Off-Campus and Neighborhood Quality of Life

Can AU commit to eliminating master leasing in the new campus plan?

No; it is AU's desired intent to maintain at least 200 master leased beds off campus, to meet the needs of students who desire to live in vibrant commercial locations close to public transportation and retail amenities, without adversely impacting residential neighborhoods surrounding campus. Currently these 200 master leased beds count toward the university's 67% housing requirement; AU proposes that this approach be maintained in the 2021 Campus Plan.

N-003 Off-Campus and Neighborhood Quality of Life

When does the master lease of the Frequency Building expire, and is up for renewal?

The master lease with Frequency expires in June 2021. The university intends to extend the lease.

N-004 Off-Campus and Neighborhood Quality of Life

Why is the AU online training limited to the following two zip codes (20016 and 20008)?

As AU pilots the online training program, it will be focused on the neighborhoods closest to campus represented by zip codes 20016 and 20008.

N-005 Off-Campus and Neighborhood Quality of Life

Westover Place Homeowners Association has concerns about the AU air handlers on the East Campus. The noise is very loud even though technically they are under the noise level. Can AU reduce this noise?

AU has and will continue to work closely with residents of Westover Place to address the issue raised about noise associated with the air handlers on East Campus.

N-006 Off-Campus and Neighborhood Quality of Life

What is AU doing to mitigate the poor wooded buffer between Westover and AU? Some buildings were damaged in the last process and would like to understand how solid the "priority" listing for AU's potential residential sites are.

AU has and will continue to work closely with residents of Westover Place to ensure the buffer is appropriately maintained.

As outlined in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU has indicated a desire to add approximately 500 beds of on-campus student housing over the term of the Campus Plan. Sites 2 and 4 on West Campus would together meet this target, and have been identified as Primary Priority Residential Sites. As detailed more fully in the Draft Campus Plan, these two new residence halls, along with the proposed Center for Athletic Performance (CAP) and consolidated student health and wellness facilities, would effectively transform an underutilized area of campus into a vibrant athletic, residential and campus life village, while maintaining a substantial distance and appropriate buffers from neighboring residential properties. While it is AU’s desired intent to maintain at least 200 master leased beds off-campus – to meet the needs of students who desire to live in vibrant commercial locations close to public transportation and retail amenities, without adversely impacting residential neighborhoods surrounding campus – AU has noted throughout the planning process that in the event the current 200 off-campus master leased beds are no longer counted toward the 67% housing requirement, the university’s target for additional on-campus beds would increase accordingly, up to approximately 700 total beds. The Secondary Priority Residential Sites identified in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, including Site 12 and the Beeghly Building (if converted to residential use), would provide for this additional capacity in the event the master leased beds cannot be counted toward the housing requirement, are not available, or if additional housing capacity is otherwise necessary over the term of the Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-001 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Why has the community engagement process for this campus plan not been as robust as the last two campus plans?

The 2021 Campus Planning effort has been shaped and informed by robust community engagement over the past two years, including a myriad of quality opportunities for meaningful community engagement. As a result of several months of dedicated and collaborative effort, the university and the AU Neighborhood Partnership have reached consensus on the objectives and commitments outlined in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-002 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Why is the AU Neighborhood Partnership getting preferential treatment over residents who are not part of the Partnership?

The 2021 Campus Planning effort has been shaped and informed by robust community engagement over the past two years, including a myriad of quality opportunities for meaningful community engagement. As a result of several months of dedicated and collaborative effort, the University and the AU Neighborhood Partnership have reached consensus on the objectives and commitments outlined in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. The university values the input of the wide range of community members that have actively participated in the planning process. Since the inception of the Partnership, neighbor leaders of the Steering Committee have conducted direct outreach to actively recruit community members to serve on Working Groups in order to provide a collection of perspectives and viewpoints that help shape balanced and well-informed alternatives and solutions. AU hosted an Open House for the Partnership in February 2019 and regularly shares information about the Partnership on AU’s Community Relations website and at community events. Outside the work of the Partnership, all residents of the community have been encouraged to participate in the planning process -- for example, through attending CLC meetings, participating in Planning 101 sessions, and submitting questions and feedback through the online Community Input Portal. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-003 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Why have many of the questions asked by residents not received satisfactory answers from AU?

AU has documented questions raised by residents throughout the planning process and has posted responses on the Campus Plan website.

P-004 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Can AU better inform neighbors about the steps for further processing?

Additional information about the steps for campus plan further processing review can be found at https://handbook.dcoz.dc.gov/zoning-rules/general-procedures/campus-plans/. Any projects included in AU’s 2021 Campus Plan proposal will not move forward until (1) the 2021 Campus Plan is approved by the Zoning Commission and (2) the specific project is further reviewed and approved by the Zoning Commission through the separate further processing process. When development projects are pursued in the future, the university will communicate with the AU community and neighbors through a variety of channels, including e-mail updates, public meetings, the Community Liaison Committee (CLC), the AU Neighborhood Partnership, the AU Community Relations newsletter, and direct discussions with neighborhood organizations.

P-005 Planning, Process, and Timeline

What is the university's process for moving forward to include the community?

AU has worked over the summer to prepare the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, which is based on the priorities, objectives, and commitments set forth in the consensus June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework. AU made the full draft Plan available for public review on September 8, 2020. The Plan will be the subject of dedicated review and discussion at ANC3D and ANC3E meetings, and also CLC meetings, throughout the summer and fall of 2020. Members of the community can find the latest available information on the Campus Plan website and are encouraged to provide feedback at any time through the Community Input Portal. The university intends to file the 2021 Campus Plan with the DC Zoning Commission by December 2020. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-006 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Is there an easy way to view questions related to the 2021 Campus Plan?

A comprehensive list of FAQs, and responses to specific questions raised by members of the community can be viewed on the Campus Plan webpage. Questions have been organized by key subject matter categories to help facilitate review of the questions and responses.

P-007 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Is the Planning 101 Session in lieu of a global neighborhood meeting regarding the 2021 Campus Plan?

AU's Planning 101 Sessions are an ongoing meeting series which bring the members of the campus community and neighborhood residents together. It is one venue among many that members of the neighborhood can review information about and provide input on the Campus Plan. See also FAQ When will the full Campus Plan be shared publicly? How will I be kept informed?

P-008 Planning, Process, and Timeline

What does the word "framework" mean?

The term “framework” refers to the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework and subsequent June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework. The framework documents outline AU’s key institutional objectives that are reflected in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. See also FAQ What are key elements of the Campus Plan? [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-009 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Who will be at the April CLC meeting? Will the architects be present?

AU staff associated with all relevant Campus Plan content areas (e.g., Enrollment, Development Plan and Campus Character, Student Life, Parking & Transportation) attended the April 2020 special CLC meetings. Representatives from Perkins Eastman, AU's planning consultant, were also present.

P-010 Planning, Process, and Timeline

I was surprised and disappointed to hear your comments on the community organization phone call organized by ANC 3D Chairman Chuck Elkins earlier this week that AU was continuing to move forward with the process it is using in conjunction with select members of the community for development of its 2021 Campus Plan. Given what AU has already posted on its web site about its campus planning process, it is clear that AU is at a stage in its planning that it should temporarily put on hold its planning process until it can hear from more community members.

AU is actively continuing its collaborative planning efforts in support of the development of the 2021 Campus Plan, including engagement with a wide range of stakeholders. These efforts include meetings with members of the American University Neighborhood Partnership, the April 28 and April 30, 2020 and August 9, 2020 special meetings of the CLC focused on the Campus Plan, the May 19, 2020 Campus Planning 101 session, and other opportunities for engagement and exchange of ideas. Community members are also encouraged to submit questions or provide feedback in connection with the Campus Plan at any time through the Community Input Portal on the Campus Plan website. The input AU has and will continue to receive from neighbors, students, faculty, staff, and other interested stakeholders has been instrumental in the development of the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework and subsequent June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework which served as the basis for the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-011 Planning, Process, and Timeline

How will AU further engage and collaborate with local schools, students, and parent-teacher associations concerning development (i.e. Mary Graydon Center)?

Throughout and following the Campus Planning process, AU will continue to engage with a wide range of stakeholders, including local schools, students, and parent-teacher associations. In particular, the Engagement and Communications Working Group of the AU Neighborhood Partnership is charged with ensuring that surrounding neighbors are aware of and have the ability to participate in campus events and activities, as well as promoting opportunities for engagement and the benefits to the community of having the university as a neighbor.

P-012 Planning, Process, and Timeline

How close is AU to finalizing the Campus Plan Framework?

Following the release of the March 3, 2020 Preliminary Campus Plan Framework, AU continued to gather and evaluate input from members of the community. As a result of this dedicated and collaborative effort, the University and the AU Neighborhood Partnership reached consensus on the objectives and commitments outlined in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, which served as the basis of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-013 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Can you provide a list of all meetings held by the AU Partnership Working Groups and minutes of those meetings associated with development of the AU Campus Plan Framework?

A comprehensive list of AU Neighborhood Partnership meetings, agendas, meeting summaries, and presentations can be found on the Campus Plan website. Both Steering Committee and Working Group meetings are included. AU will continue to update the website regularly.

P-014 Planning, Process, and Timeline

What guarantees are there that the consensus of buildings right now will be maintained when further processing comes?

Consistent with the DC Zoning Regulations, the 2021 Campus Plan will identify the location, height, bulk and use of proposed development sites. More specific information including building footprints and design details will be developed and reviewed as part of the further processing approval process required for each proposed project.

P-015 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Has the 2021 Campus Plan reached a consensus within the AU Neighborhood Partnership?

As noted in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, as a result of several months of dedicated and collaborative effort, the University and the AU Neighborhood Partnership reached consensus on the objectives and commitments outlined in the Campus Plan Framework, which served as the basis of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-016 Planning, Process, and Timeline

What is the 2021 Campus Plan submission timeline?

AU has worked over the summer to prepare the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, which is based on the priorities, objectives, and commitments set forth in the AU Neighborhood Partnership-affirmed consensus June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework . The Campus Plan will be the subject of discussion and review over several months, including CLC meetings and ANC3D and ANC3E meetings throughout the summer and fall of 2020. Members of the community can find the latest available information on the Campus Plan website and are encouraged to provide feedback at any time through the Community Input Portal. The university intends to file the 2021 Campus Plan with the DC Zoning Commission by December 2020. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-017 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Why has there not been enough quality opportunity for community engagement as the current campus plan runs through March of 2022?

The 2021 Campus Planning effort has been shaped and informed by robust community engagement over the past two years, including a myriad of quality opportunities for meaningful community engagement. As a result of several months of dedicated and collaborative effort, the university and the AU Neighborhood Partnership reached consensus on the objectives and commitments outlined in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework, which served as the basis of the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. See also response to Question P-013. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-018 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Why does AU want to finalize the 2021 Campus Plan two years ahead of time?

AU is not seeking to finalize the 2021 Campus Plan two years ahead of time. AU has presented a timeline for review and development of the 2021 Campus Plan that aligns with AU's strategic plan and the launch of its next major fundraising campaign. The 2021 Campus Planning effort has been shaped and informed by robust community engagement over the past two years, including a myriad of quality opportunities for meaningful community engagement. The planned target date for filing the 2021 Campus Plan with the Zoning Commission will allow time for thorough review and consideration by the Commission prior to the expiration of the 2011 Campus Plan.

P-019 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Why has AU turned to the AU Neighborhood Partnership instead of the CLC, as the designated group in for the campus plan as per the Zoning Commission?

As detailed in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU has engaged with both the Neighborhood Partnership and the CLC, consistent with the roles and objectives of each forum as discussed in the 2011 Campus Plan zoning order and subsequent related zoning orders. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

P-020 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Why is the CLC no longer the designated party for decision making?

The CLC has not been designated as a party for "decision-making" in any order of the Zoning Commission. As affirmed in the 2011 Campus Plan order, the CLC continues to serve the purpose of fostering consistent communication between the university and the surrounding neighborhoods, discussing issues of mutual interest, and proposing solutions to problems that exist or arise in implementing the Campus Plan.

P-021 Planning, Process, and Timeline

This year's Campus Plan cycle seems to be moving much faster than in previous cycles. Can you please share why AU has chosen not to slow the process down in the midst of COVID 19.

See response to Question C-002.

T-001 Transportation and Parking

How much does AU charge for parking?

Parking rates for faculty and staff, students, and visitors can be found here: https://www.american.edu/finance/transportation/parking.cfm

T-002 Transportation and Parking

Do the 275 parking spaces mentioned in the [June 2020 CLC] presentation belong to the Spring Valley building?

The Spring Valley Building garage includes 275 parking spaces.

T-003 Transportation and Parking

Can AU influence the siting of bike share stations, and address removal of the scooters strewn about neighborhood sidewalks and streets?

Issues such as bike share stations and scooters will be addressed as part of the Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) that is a required component of the Campus Plan process.

T-004 Transportation and Parking

Does AU have any plans to improve the parking garage at 4801 Massachusetts Avenue? The poles are too close together.

AU is continuing to evaluate improvements to garage signage and wayfinding in the parking garage at 4801 Massachusetts Avenue.

T-005 Transportation and Parking

Can the campus plan address the need for drop-off and pick-up zones that accommodate ride-sharing services in ways that do not disrupt traffic?

Issues including ride share pick-up/drop-off zones will be specifically addressed as part of the Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) that is a required component of the Campus Plan process.

T-006 Transportation and Parking

How can better enforcement of the Good Neighbor Parking Policy address the rules for parking so as to ensure cars from AU students are not parked in our neighborhoods?

AU continues to strive to improve its enforcement efforts to ensure that AU students are not parked on neighborhood streets. These issues will be specifically addressed as part of the Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) that is a required component of the Campus Plan process.

T-007 Transportation and Parking

How will the Campus Plan impact traffic on Nebraska Avenue?

Issues related to the impact of the proposals included in the 2021 Campus Plan on the streets surrounding the campus will be specifically addressed as part of the Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) that is a required component of the Campus Plan process.

T-008 Transportation and Parking

What is the number and amount of parking fines paid by AU visitors? Are there numbers you can share of tickets that were issued wrongfully?

Between March 1, 2019 and March 31, 2020 AU issued 948 citations for violations of the Good Neighbor Parking Policy. Of those, 402 have been noted as "inactive" which includes tickets voided for various reasons such as non-affiliated individual/neighbor, or if the individual provides documentation showing their visit was unrelated to AU.

T-009 Transportation and Parking

Can AU more fully engage or encourage students and faculty to bike on and around campus?

As part of the university's TDM strategy, AU actively works to encourage community members to utilize alternative forms of transportation that will reduce the number of single occupancy vehicles coming to campus. Part of this effort is focused on providing facilities that support bike use (e.g., bike racks, showers) as well as working with entities such as Capital Bikeshare to provide discount memberships. AU's Office of Transportation Programs also partners with the Office of Sustainability to promote Bike To Work days and will continue to look for other opportunities to further encourage biking to and around campus.

T-010 Transportation and Parking

To what extent, if any, is AU working with scooter companies?

The university is currently evaluating partnership opportunities with the scooter companies licensed to operate in the District of Columbia with the intent to exercise better control over scooter use on campus and in the surrounding community.

T-011 Transportation and Parking

Of the roughly 3,000 parking spaces included in the AU Campus Plan framework, how many of these parking spaces will be located on the main campus?

The June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework outlines a strategy for parking that would modify the Campus Plan requirement to maintain a parking inventory of no more than 3,000 spaces for university use (inclusive of all properties included in the 2021 Campus Plan, specifically Main Campus, Tenley Campus, 4801 Massachusetts Avenue, 4200 Wisconsin Avenue, and 3201 New Mexico Avenue. The number of spaces that would be located on the Main Campus at any given time would depend upon the sequencing of proposed development projects described in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan and whether below-grade parking is included in the proposed development at Sites 11/12 and Site 15 (which will be determined as part of the further processing review for each of those sites). Based on these considerations, the range of parking spaces that could be located on the Main Campus over the term of the 2021 Campus Plan is between approximately 1,580 and 2,180 spaces, assuming that university use of parking spaces at 4801 Massachusetts Avenue, 4200 Wisconsin Avenue, and 3201 New Mexico Avenue (as detailed in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan) remains consistent with current utilization. [UPDATED 09.10.2020]

T-012 Transportation and Parking

Will AU publicize the results of the traffic study conducted for the campus plan?

The Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) is available on the Campus Plan website.

T-013 Transportation and Parking

Is the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) included in data related to transportation and parking?

Intersection traffic analysis for the Campus Plan Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) is based on data collected in February 2020 for all Campus Plan locations, which included OLLI participants at 4801 Massachusetts Avenue as well as all other university-related and non-university related (background) traffic impacts within the transportation study area.

T-014 Transportation and Parking

Are the AU shuttles running this Fall semester?

Due to campus operational changes resulting from the university’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the AU shuttles are operating on a limited basis during the fall 2020 semester for AU staff, faculty, and students.

T-015 Transportation and Parking

How many parking spaces is AU planning to eliminate on the main campus?

The number of parking spaces eliminated (or gained) on Main Campus will depend on the sequencing of the proposed development projects on campus and whether or not any underground parking will be included in connection with proposed development sites 11/12 and proposed development site 15 as described in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan. Based on the current proposed development sites, the maximum number of spaces that could potentially be lost on the Main Campus is approximately 298 spaces. On the other hand, if below ground parking is included on proposed development sites 11/12 and/or site 15, then the Main Campus parking inventory could increase. In any event, as noted in the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan, AU has proposed that the total university-use parking inventory across all Campus Plan properties (including Main Campus, Tenley Campus, 4801 Massachusetts Avenue NW, 4200 Wisconsin Avenue NW, and 3201 New Mexico Avenue NW) will not exceed 3,000 parking spaces.

C-015 COVID-19

For the 2,700 students who live in the 20008 and 20016 zip codes, how is AU enforcing their COVID-19 guidelines for them? Can you share the training guidelines? Will those outside of the 20008 and 20016 zip codes get the same training?

All American University students, faculty and staff, including students who live in the 20016 and 20008 zip codes are required to participate in mandatory COVID-19 training. The training focuses on protecting the health and safety of the AU community.

D-017 Development Plan and Campus Character

Please provide more information on condition #11 when discussing AU residence hall regulations.

Proposed condition 11 of the October 27, 2020 Campus Plan draft is based on 2011 Campus Plan condition 5, as updated in Zoning Commission Order 11-07F, and provides that "housing provided by the University through a master lease of all or almost all of a residential building that is subject to AU residence hall regulations may be considered 'on campus' housing for the purpose of calculating the housing percentages [maintaining a supply of housing sufficient to make housing available for 100 percent of full-time freshman and sophomore students and for 67 percent of all full-time undergraduates]". The proposed condition also discusses the opportunity for public review in the event the off-campus housing does not comprise all or almost all of a residential building.

D-018 Development Plan and Campus Character

There has been a large increase in activity at Jacobs Field in the last 15 years. During the last 2011 Campus Plan there were specific conditions set for Jacobs Field including time slots for use and placement of speakers. A few years ago, AU met to discuss a soundwall to help with the exceedances of noise. AU now proposes to build a wall, but also wants to change the conditions. There are many concern is that any changed conditions are contingent on the engineering of the new sound wall and should not be modified until its completion.

Proposed condition 14 of the October 27, 2020 Campus Plan Draft states that “Until such time as the Zoning Commission takes specific action on the proposed acoustical sound barrier wall, the conditions set forth in ZC Order 11-07 [the 2011 Campus Plan which is currently in effect] with respect to Jacobs Field (specifically conditions 17 through 25) will remain in effect and enforceable.” The university will work with members of the community, including the residents of 4710 Woodway Lane NW and other residents in the vicinity of Jacobs Field as specified in Zoning Commission Order 11-07, to further evaluate the details of specific impacts, the scope of permitted uses of the field, and any potential alternative mitigation measures prior to the submission of a further processing application for the acoustical sound barrier wall proposed in the 2021 Campus Plan.

H-022 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

How many beds could AU build if they built out all their residential options?

As detailed in Section 4.3.3 of the draft Campus Plan, AU's target number of new on-campus beds over the term of the plan will depend upon the number of off-campus master-leased beds that are counted toward the 67 percent housing requirement. Assuming the current status is maintained and off-campus master-leased beds continue to be counted toward the requirement, the university proposes to add up to 500 additional beds on campus over the term of the plan. In the event the current 200 off-campus master leased beds are no longer counted toward the 67 percent housing requirement, the university's target for additional on-campus beds would increase accordingly, up to approximately 700 total beds.

H-023 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

Will the maximum number of additional beds beyond the additional 500 be 200 more if the Frequency lease expired?

In the event the current 200 off-campus master leased beds are no longer counted toward the 67 percent housing requirement, the university's target for additional on-campus beds would increase accordingly, up to approximately 700 total beds.

D-019 Development Plan and Campus Character

When will construction begin? Are any sites slated for first build?

No construction timelines have been established for the proposed development sites in the draft 2021 Campus Plan. Preliminary planning and evaluation is currently underway for one project proposed in the Plan, specifically site 3, the Center for Athletic Perfromance (CAP).

D-020 Development Plan and Campus Character

Can you share an update on the work being done at the remediation site of the Public Safety building?

This project is part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site effort and the associated work on the site is under their direction and control. Project updates are available at https://www.nab.usace.army.mil/Home/Spring-Valley/

D-021 Development Plan and Campus Character

Can you please explain why the site numbers in the 2021 Campus Plan document were altered from the 2021 Campus Plan Framework.

Some of the proposed development site numbers used during the planning process were modified in the September 8, 2020 Campus Plan Draft in an effort to consolidate and clarify the site nomenclature for the Campus Plan. This occurred because some sites under consideration during the planning process were removed (e.g., sites identified during the planning process as sites 1 and 11) , and other sites evaluated during the planning process were referred to only by the name of the facility (e.g., SCAN replacement, Beeghly Hall addition) and not by a number. All sites are now numbered and follow a coherent pattern beginning with Site 1 (Beeghly Hall), circling clockwise around the Main Campus and then ending with Site 15 (on East Campus). A crosswalk of the site numbers and building designations used during the planning process and the site numbers included in the Campus Plan draft is included in Exhibit L.

D-022 Development Plan and Campus Character

Will AU agree to respect the current commitments regarding Jacobs Field until the new Campus Plan is approved?

Proposed condition 14 of the October 27, 2020 Campus Plan Draft states that “Until such time as the Zoning Commission takes specific action on the proposed acoustical sound barrier wall, the conditions set forth in ZC Order 11-07 [the 2011 Campus Plan which is currently in effect] with respect to Jacobs Field (specifically conditions 17 through 25) will remain in effect and enforceable.”

D-023 Development Plan and Campus Character

I have reviewed the Campus Plan Draft dated September 8, 2020. I have been an active member of the American University Neighborhood Partnership Committee on Facilities Planning so I am familiar with much of the plan but the content on Jacob’s Field items 14-20 on pages 56-7 is new to me. As you know, we have been working several years to try to resolve, once and for all, the continuing problem that emanates from excessive and objectionable noise from activities on Jacob’s Field that interferes with the ordinary enjoyment of our property, and that exceeds city noise ordinances on a regular basis. The conditions set by ZC 11-07 in 2011 have helped limit the use of amplified sound, establishing reasonable principles about timing, frequency and types of noise on the field. Those conditions have been in effect since then and they have had a marked and greatly appreciated impact on limiting noise that reaches neighbors. We know this in part because on occasions when the rules are not followed, the noise pattern has been intolerable (for example, when multiple raised speakers were set next to the property line and turned to high volume during an informal practice and during a club social event). Bullhorns, cow bells, and shot clocks are types of objectionable noise that add to the jarring and disturbing impact of loud noise and exceed District of Columbia limits. These are restricted by the 2011 conditions, and by and large the noise level is tolerable when the rules are followed. We appreciate the efforts of the University to adhere to the conditions. Following the conditions set by the Zoning Commission, we worked very closely with the senior team at AU, along with sound engineers chosen by the University, to address the serious noise problems. The engineers carefully studied the sound sources and the field and sound levels at various locations during different games and other activities, and we were all in general agreement on principles, and on remediations. The engineers determined that a sound wall at a given location with highly specific characteristics and highly specific sound sources and loudness would significantly mitigate noise, although not eliminate all objectionable and excessive noise at ground level. Excessive noise would be greater at the bedroom level of our house, given the line-of-sight travel of noise, but we were generously willing to tolerate highly limited amounts of such noise because the sound fence would likely resolve most problems at ground level. The engineers showed this graphically and wrote reports summarizing their findings and recommendations. We were disappointed that the building of the sound wall that we agreed has been delayed. The Zoning Commission set conditions on the use of Jacobs Field in 11-07 in 2011. Those conditions have been in effect since that order. In the current September 4, 2020 draft of the 2021 Campus Plan, the conditions from 11-07 would expire and be replaced by new conditions that are presented on pages 56-57 numbered 14-20. Those conditions – written before the wall is designed or engineered or tested and without neighbor input and without specifying information about the sources of sound and the expected mitigation of sound, and without being tested with the then-extant conditions -- would come into effect when the “Zoning Commission takes specific action on the proposed acoustical barrier sound wall”. There is no sound wall yet, not even in confirmed design. Respectfully, to change prospectively the conditions on field use - - indeed to liberalize them considerably - - because of a wall that is not yet designed and engineered and tested makes no sense. There is no reason why the University can or should not operate under existing conditions until the wall specified by the Zoning Commission is complete and tested and new conditions, if necessary, are agreed to. It's regrettably clear that excessive and objectionable levels of noise reaching neighbors would ironically increase if the new conditions supersede the previous ones. The proposed tower on Jacob’s Field (p. 50) is another example of the need for understanding the use and gathering engineering data and setting conditions before plans are made. Science should dictate these important matters. The time to modify conditions is when the wall has been engineered, the field conditions are confirmed, and the wall has been built and tested. To do anything else is contrary to fundamental principles of the science of sound mitigation. The field, the sources of noise, their type and location and height and frequency and volume, the impact of environment (including new buildings that could be built pursuant to this campus plan, elevation of nearby land, etc.) can also have effects on sound patterns and must be taken into account. Otherwise, the cart is being put before the horse. We are by no means opposed to AU athletics, and we, for example, would welcome the use of Jacob’s Field by DC public school groups – who have had limited access in the past. In summary, I request that conditions 17-25 from the 2011 Campus Plan be retained and replace the conditions 15-20 in the current draft until the future processing application for Jacob’s Field. This will allow all the interactive technical elements of the acoustic barrier plan and conditions for the use of the field to be considered together, as they must be to be logical and effective. It would be premature and contrary to principles of sound engineering for AU to predetermine conditions at this time. I look forward to constructive mutual engagement with the University around the engineering and inherently connected conditions of field use as soon as developments allow.

With respect to the request noted in the comment that "conditions 17-25 from the 2011 Campus Plan be retained and replace the conditions 15-20 in the current draft until the future processing application for Jacob’s Field", proposed condition 14 of the September 8, 2020 Campus Plan Draft (page 56) already reflects this approach. Specifically, proposed condition 14 states “Until such time as the Zoning Commission takes specific action on the proposed acoustical sound barrier wall, the conditions set forth in ZC Order 11-07 [the 2011 Campus Plan which is currently in effect] with respect to Jacobs Field (specifically conditions 17 through 25) will remain in effect and enforceable.” Proposed conditions 15 – 20 included in the September 8, 2020 Campus Plan Draft were never intended to take effect until after the Zoning Commission takes action on the proposed acoustical sound barrier wall; until such time, the existing conditions regarding Jacobs Field from ZC Order 11-07 would remain in effect and enforceable. That being said, in light of the concerns raised in your comment, AU worked with the AU Neighborhood Partnership Steering Committee to consider changes to the Campus Plan that pertain to the acoustical sound barrier wall. These changes include removing proposed conditions 15 – 20 and confirming that the University will work with members of the community prior to the submission of a further processing application in connection with the proposed acoustical sound barrier wall; please refer to Section 4.3.2 and proposed condition 14 of the October 26, 2020 Campus Plan Draft.

E-035 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Please provide clarification on condition #5.

Proposed condition 5 sets forth the proposed 2021 Campus Plan enrollment cap of 14,380 students, including University students from all Campus Plan locations -- which, for the purposes of the 2021 Campus Plan, includes Main Campus, Tenley Campus, 4801 Massachusetts Avenue NW, 4200 Wisconsin Avenue NW, and 3201 New Mexico Avenue NW. The condition also notes that the number of students enrolled at the Tenley Campus shall not exceed 2,000 students.

E-036 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

What is the Fall 2021 enrollment for AU?

See response to Question E-026.

E-037 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

Will AU have enrollment numbers when they go before the Zoning Commission?

Enrollment data is included in Section 4.1.1 of the October 27, 2020 draft Campus Plan and also detailed in Exhibit G: Student Enrollment.

E-038 Student Enrollment and Employee Population

I am confused by the adjustment of the 6.61% increase to the student enrollment cap.

See responses to Questions E-007 and E-027.

H-020 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

How did AU get the 500 additional bed numbers using Sites 2 and 4.

Estimated bed counts for each proposed residential site, which clarify how Sites 2 and 4 together would provide a total of 500 beds, are illustrated in this diagram.

H-021 On-Campus Life and Student Housing

The bed count information should be in the 2021 Campus Plan draft.

Estimated bed counts for each proposed residential site are illustrated in this diagram, which was included in the June 1, 2020 Campus Plan Framework and has been incorporated into the October 27, 2020 draft of the 2021 Campus Plan.

P-022 Planning, Process, and Timeline

It is unreasonable to expect people to read through the campus plan in a week's time. There needs to be another CLC meeting to discuss the 2021 Campus Plan and this version of the Campus Plan is not as detailed as past campus plans, including the purposes of the new buildings.

The September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan reflects the priorities, objectives and commitments set forth in the June 1, 2020 framework. Questions regarding the September 8, 2020 Draft Campus Plan can be raised at ANC meetings, Campus Plan update meetings that have been scheduled with numerous community organizations, or submitted through the Community Input Portal. Consistent with the new requirements of the 2016 Zoning Regulations, the 2021 Campus Plan does not include any concurrent further processing applications for specific buildings; as such, the 2021 Campus Plan does not include building-level detail that had been included in prior Campus Plan applications that did include concurrent further processing applications.

P-023 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Please use language that might make that clearer clarify conditions in the 2021 Campus Plan, using condition #2 for an example.

The campus locations referenced in Condition 2 are clearly identified and depicted in Exhibit A: Existing Campus Conditions of the October 27, 2020 Draft Campus Plan.

P-024 Planning, Process, and Timeline

Are there are further Working Group meetings scheduled for the Fall?

Several AU Neighborhood Partnership Working Group meetings have been scheduled for Fall 2020; for additional information please see the AU Neighborhood Partnership documents page.

T-016 Transportation and Parking

Can we have more information about the draft traffic study for AU?

The Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) that has been submitted to DDOT in connection with the 2021 Campus Plan can be viewed online.