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*This does not constitute an employment contract

17 April 2019

Department of Literature Guidelines for Term Faculty Reappointment and Promotion

(Approved by Provost July 2019)

There are two permanent bodies in the Department of Literature responsible for the reappointment and promotion of Term Faculty. The Writing Studies Program Reappointment & Promotion (WSP R&P) Committee oversees reappointment and promotion actions for Term Faculty whose teaching is predominantly in Writing Studies (WRTG) courses, with the exception of applications to promotion to Term Associate or Term Professor, discussed in a separate section below. The Literature Department Reappointment and Tenure Committee (LIT R&T) oversees reappointment and promotion actions for term faculty whose teaching is predominantly in Literature (LIT) courses.

Section 1 includes guidelines for Department of Literature Term Faculty applying for reappointment to a one-year contract in WSP (1.1) and LIT (1.2). Section 2 includes guidelines for Term Faculty applying for promotion and/or reappointment to a multiyear contract in the Professorial Lecturer (PL) sequence in WSP (2.1) and in LIT (2.2); and Term Faculty applying for reappointment to a multi-year contract in the Term Professor sequence in LIT (2.3). Section 3 includes guidelines for Term Faculty applying for promotion in the Term Professor sequence in LIT (3.1); and Term Faculty applying for promotion from PL to Term Associate Professor in WSP (3.2). Definitions of “Currency in the Field” for WSP R&P and for LIT R&T are included in Appendix 1. Definitions of the PL and Term Professor sequences for WSP and LIT are included in Appendix 2: Academic Ranks and Qualifications.

Department of Literature Criteria for LIT & WSP Term Faculty Reappointment and Promotion

Department of Literature term faculty are evaluated on their teaching and service. In addition, according to the Faculty Manual, “Scholarly or professional engagement that enhances teaching is strongly encouraged. All term faculty are expected to remain current in their field” [For program-specific definitions of “currency in the field,” see Appendix 1]. WSP and LIT term faculty seeking promotion to the ranks of Term Associate Professor or Term Professor are evaluated on their scholarship, teaching, and service, as detailed below.

Per the Faculty Manual, “Appointments and reappointments of all term faculty are contingent on the relevant qualifications and performance of the faculty member, the enrollments and other needs of the teaching or academic unit, and the instructional resources of the university.”

1. Guidelines for Term Faculty Applying for Reappointment to a One-Year Contract

Department of Literature term faculty members are expected to develop as teachers and colleagues, with a goal of becoming an outstanding faculty member who has the motivation, ability, and skills to engage in continued professional growth. Therefore, we expect that newer faculty members applying for one-year reappointments may not yet fully demonstrate all the characteristics listed below; we also expect, though, to see evidence of movement toward these characteristics over time, with substantive response to feedback in successive files. These guidelines therefore apply to faculty with varying lengths of employment at AU, and for that reason, different faculty will be held to different standards at different points in their careers, within the parameters of these guidelines.

We also want to emphasize that there are many ways to demonstrate effective teaching and service within these parameters, and we encourage faculty to develop their own pedagogical approaches while still staying grounded in the learning outcomes and the research-based approaches to first-year composition.

1.1 Guidelines for WSP Term Faculty Applying for Reappointment to a One-Year Contract

Evidence of effective teaching is revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

1. Course content and materials that align with the WSP learning outcomes and that support student progress toward achieving those outcomes.

2. Course content and materials that reflect currency in the field of writing studies [see Appendix 1.1].

3. Course themes, texts, and writing assignments that are intellectually rigorous and that foster critical thinking and reading skills, as well as original ideas and informed opinions.

4. Detailed syllabi with clearly defined goals, policies, and course requirements.

5. Writing assignments that are clear and sufficiently detailed, while still allowing students room to explore and develop their own thinking.

6. Assignments that teach students to write and read in a variety of genres—for example, critical analysis, narrative, researched essay, textual critique, rhetorical analysis, annotated bibliography, research proposal, synthesis/literature review, researched essay, profile, oral history, feature article, or other forms of researched-based, analytical, or persuasive writing.

7. Assignments and projects that foster development of rhetorical awareness, invention strategies, process moves, recursive revision, etc.

8. Assignments and projects that guide students to acquire information literacy and research skills, including making full and meaningful use of the library’s resources, such as databases, catalog, stacks, periodicals, and media holdings, and non-textual sources (e.g., both on and beyond campus); assignments that require students to evaluate the credibility of sources, to use academic/scholarly resources, and to incorporate and engage with sources effectively.

9. Feedback on student writing--in print, in conference, or in other modes--that attends to the WSP Grading Criteria by challenging students while encouraging improvement, instructing while evaluating, and addressing both holistic and sentence-level issues in the writing.

10. Student Evaluations of Teaching that are in line with typical WSP ranges; SET numbers that consistently fall below those ranges will be addressed in the committee’s letter.

Effective teaching might also be revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

  1. Community engagement beyond the classroom.
  2. Initiatives to encourage student research beyond classroom assignments.
  3. New course development.
  4. Reports of voluntary classroom observations by members of the Reappointment and Promotion committee and/or teaching unit head.
  5. Supervision of independent study, internships, theses, and dissertations.
  6. Statements prepared by individual faculty members describing teaching philosophy, pedagogic strategies, innovative approaches to enhance learning, and distinctive contributions to the improvement of teaching and learning at the university.
  7. Use of innovative technologies and pedagogical strategies.

And any other material deemed to be useful in considering teaching effectiveness.

Evidence of effective service is revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

  1. Meaningful participation in one or two WSP or department committees in the first year of employment, increasing to two WSP or department committees after the first year.
  2. Over time, willingness to take on leadership roles in committees (as a committee chair or in some other role) or start new initiatives.
  3. Over time, participation in committees and projects outside the WSP or department.
  4. Attendance at WSP and university faculty-development events, such as Teaching Round Tables, professional-development events, CTRL workshops, and the Ann Ferren Conference; over time, leadership of faculty-development workshops.
  5. Engagement with the field of writing studies and related fields such as conference attendance (conference presentations are encouraged but not required), or other professional or scholarly contributions.

And any other activity deemed to be useful in considering service.

1.2 Guidelines for LIT Term Faculty Applying for Reappointment to a One-Year Contract

Literature term faculty will be evaluated according to the following criteria for teaching, service, and currency in the field.

Teaching:

Evidence of effective teaching can be found throughout the applicant’s file: the introductory memo, annual report, curriculum vitae, teaching evaluations, syllabi, assignments, and other relevant materials the applicant may choose to include. A faculty member’s SET scores should be in line with typical ranges of Literature Department faculty. SET numbers that consistently fall below those ranges will be addressed in the committee’s letter to the term faculty member under review. SETs scores significantly below departmental faculty ranges over several years may be grounds for non-renewal of a contract.

However, evidence of effective teaching may be demonstrated in a variety of ways and practices apart from SET scores (items are not in ranking order):

1. Course design and up-to-date course content, as demonstrated in detailed syllabi with clearly defined goals, policies, and course requirements.

2. Course content and materials that reflect currency in at least one of the fields covered by the Department of Literature [see Appendix 1.2].

3. Writing assignments that clearly support course learning outcomes and provide sufficient guidance to students while also allowing them room to explore and develop their own ideas.

4. Development of new courses or curricular initiatives.

5. Initiatives to encourage student research beyond classroom assignments.

6. Evidence of student engagement and achievements outside the classroom.

7. Supervision of independent study, internships, theses, and dissertations; mentoring of Literature major capstone projects; mentoring of student projects based in other departments or programs.

8. Use of innovative technologies and pedagogical strategies.

9. Active participation in department and CAS-sponsored events such as the annual Department of Literature Colloquium, Lit Day, and the CAS Robyn Rafferty Mathias Student Research Conference.

10. Active participation in and presentations at department and CTRL-sponsored conferences and workshops on teaching, such as Teaching Round Tables, the Ann Ferren Conference, Noontime Conversations, and August Workshops on Teaching, Research, and Technology.

11. A statement prepared by the individual term faculty member describing teaching philosophy, pedagogic strategies, innovative approaches to enhance learning, and distinctive contributions to the improvement of teaching and learning at the university

12. Reports of voluntary classroom observations by members of the department’s Reappointment and Tenure committee and/or department chair

And any other material deemed to be useful in considering teaching effectiveness.

Service:

Literature term faculty members seeking reappointment to a one-year contract must have begun to demonstrate regular participation in the department’s and the university’s collective work, ranging from service on committees to other forms of service (e.g. participation on graduate thesis committees, reading graduate applications, participating in freshman visiting days, etc.).

And any other activity deemed to be useful in considering service.

Currency in the field:

See Appendix 1.2.

2. Guidelines for Term Faculty Applying for Reappointment with Promotion and/or a Multi-Year Contract

For academic ranks and qualifications in the PL and Term Professor sequences, see Appendix 2.

2.1 Guidelines for WSP Term Faculty Applying for Reappointment with Promotion and/or a Multi-Year Contract

Evidence of effective teaching can be found throughout the applicant’s file: the introductory memo, annual report, curriculum vitae, teaching evaluations, syllabi, assignments, student papers with comments, and any other materials the applicant may choose to include. We also want to emphasize that there are many ways to demonstrate effective teaching and service within these parameters, and we encourage faculty to develop their own pedagogical approaches while still staying grounded in the learning outcomes and the research-based approaches to first-year composition.

Evidence of effective teaching is revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

1. Course content and materials that align with the WSP learning outcomes and that support student progress toward achieving those outcomes.

2. Course content and materials that reflect currency in the field of writing studies [see appendix].

3. Course themes, texts, and writing assignments that are intellectually rigorous and that foster critical thinking and reading skills, as well as original ideas and informed opinions.

4. Detailed syllabi with clearly defined goals, policies, and course requirements.

5. Writing assignments that are clear and sufficiently detailed, while still allowing students room to explore and develop their own thinking.

6. Assignments that teach students to write and read in a variety of genres—for example, critical analysis, narrative, researched essay, textual critique, rhetorical analysis, annotated bibliography, research proposal, synthesis/literature review, researched essay, profile, oral history, feature article, or other forms of researched-based, analytical, or persuasive writing.

7. Assignments and projects that foster development of rhetorical awareness, invention strategies, process moves, recursive revision, etc.

8. Assignments and projects that guide students to acquire information literacy and research skills, including making full and meaningful use of the library’s resources, such as databases, catalog, stacks, periodicals, and media holdings, and non-textual sources (e.g., both on and beyond campus); assignments that require students to evaluate the credibility of sources, to use academic/scholarly resources, and to incorporate and engage with sources effectively.

9. Feedback on student writing--in print, in conference, or in other modes--that attends to the WSP Grading Criteria by challenging students while encouraging improvement, instructing while evaluating, and addressing both holistic and sentence-level issues in the writing.

10. Student Evaluations of Teaching that are in line with typical WSP ranges; SET numbers that consistently fall below those ranges will be addressed in the committee’s letter.

Effective teaching might also be revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

  1. Community engagement beyond the classroom.
  2. Initiatives to encourage student research beyond classroom assignments.
  3. New course development.
  4. Reports of voluntary classroom observations by members of the Reappointment and Promotion committee and/or teaching unit head.
  5. Supervision of independent study, internships, theses, and dissertations.
  6. Statements prepared by individual faculty members describing teaching philosophy, pedagogic strategies, innovative approaches to enhance learning, and distinctive contributions to the improvement of teaching and learning at the university.
  7. Use of innovative technologies and pedagogical strategies.

And any other material deemed to be useful in considering teaching effectiveness.

Evidence of Effective Service
See below (service criteria for promotion listed within the rank descriptions).

2.2 Guidelines for LIT Term Faculty in the PL Sequence Applying for Promotion and/or Reappointment to a Multi-Year Contract

Literature term faculty in the PL sequence will be evaluated according to the following criteria for teaching, service, and currency in the field.

Teaching:

Evidence of effective teaching can be found throughout the applicant’s file: the introductory memo, annual report, curriculum vitae, teaching evaluations, syllabi, assignments, and other relevant materials the applicant may choose to include. A faculty member’s SET scores should be in line with typical ranges of Literature Department faculty. SET numbers that consistently fall below those ranges will be addressed in the committee’s letter to the term faculty member under review. SETs scores significantly below departmental faculty ranges over several years may be grounds for non-renewal of a contract or lack of a recommendation for promotion.

However, evidence of effective teaching may be demonstrated in a variety of ways and practices apart from SET scores (items are not in ranking order):

1. Course design and up-to-date course content, as demonstrated in detailed syllabi with clearly defined goals, policies, and course requirements.

2. Course content and materials that reflect currency in at least one of the fields covered by the Department of Literature [see Appendix 1.2].

3. Writing assignments that clearly support course learning outcomes and provide sufficient guidance to students while also allowing them room to explore and develop their own ideas.

4. Development of new courses or curricular initiatives.

5. Initiatives to encourage student research beyond classroom assignments.

6. Evidence of student engagement and achievements outside the classroom.

7. Supervision of independent study, internships, theses, and dissertations; mentoring of Literature major capstone projects; mentoring of students in literary activities beyond the classroom, such as participation in the Literature Colloquium, Matthias Student Research Conference, AmLit; mentoring of student projects based in other departments or programs.

8. Use of innovative technologies and pedagogical strategies.

9. Active participation in department- and CAS-sponsored events such as the annual Department of Literature Colloquium, Lit Day, and the CAS Robyn Rafferty Mathias Student Research Conference.

10. Active participation in and presentations at department and CTRL-sponsored conferences and workshops on teaching, such as Teaching Round Tables, the Ann Ferren Conference, Noontime Conversations, and August Workshops on Teaching, Research, and Technology.

11. A statement prepared by the individual term faculty member describing teaching philosophy, pedagogic strategies, innovative approaches to enhance learning, and distinctive contributions to the improvement of teaching and learning at the university

12. Reports of voluntary classroom observations by members of the department’s Reappointment and Tenure committee and/or department chair

And any other material deemed to be useful in considering teaching effectiveness.

Service:

Literature term faculty members seeking promotion and/or reappointment to a multi-year contract must have demonstrated full and regular participation in the department’s and the university’s collective work, ranging from service on committees to other forms of service (e.g. participation on graduate thesis committees, reading graduate applications, participating in freshman visiting days, etc.).

And any other activity deemed to be useful in considering service.

Currency in the field:

See Appendix 1.2.

2. 3 Guidelines for LIT Term Faculty in the Term Professor Sequence Applying for Reappointment to a Multi-Year Contract

Literature term faculty in the Term Professor sequence will be evaluated according to the following criteria for teaching, service, and currency in the field.

Teaching:

Evidence of effective teaching can be found throughout the applicant’s file: the introductory memo, annual report, curriculum vitae, teaching evaluations, syllabi, assignments, and other relevant materials the applicant may choose to include. A faculty member’s SET scores should be in line with typical ranges of Literature Department faculty. SET numbers that consistently fall below those ranges will be addressed in the committee’s letter to the term faculty member under review. Evidence of ineffective teaching, which may include SET scores significantly below departmental faculty ranges over several years, may be grounds for non-renewal of a contract or lack of a recommendation for promotion.

However, evidence of effective teaching may be demonstrated in a variety of ways and practices apart from SET scores (items are not in ranking order):

1. Course design and up-to-date course content, as demonstrated in detailed syllabi with clearly defined goals, policies, and course requirements.

2. Course content and materials that reflect currency in at least one of the fields covered by the Department of Literature [see Appendix 1.2].

3. Writing assignments that clearly support course learning outcomes and provide sufficient guidance to students while also allowing them room to explore and develop their own ideas.

4. Development of new courses or curricular initiatives.

5. Initiatives to encourage student research beyond classroom assignments.

6. Evidence of student engagement and achievements outside the classroom.

7. Supervision of independent study, internships, theses, and dissertations; mentoring of Literature major capstone projects; mentoring of students in literary activities beyond the classroom, such as participation in the Literature Colloquium, Matthias Student Research Conference, AmLit; mentoring of student projects based in other departments or programs.

8. Use of innovative technologies and pedagogical strategies.

9. Active participation in department- and CAS-sponsored events such as the annual Department of Literature Colloquium, Lit Day, and the CAS Robyn Rafferty Mathias Student Research Conference.

10. Active participation in and presentations at department and CTRL-sponsored conferences and workshops on teaching, such as Teaching Round Tables, the Ann Ferren Conference, Noontime Conversations, and August Workshops on Teaching, Research, and Technology.

11. A statement prepared by the individual term faculty member describing teaching philosophy, pedagogic strategies, innovative approaches to enhance learning, and distinctive contributions to the improvement of teaching and learning at the university

12. Reports of voluntary classroom observations by members of the department’s Reappointment and Tenure committee and/or department chair

And any other material deemed to be useful in considering teaching effectiveness.

Service:

Literature term faculty members seeking reappointment to a multi-year contract must have demonstrated full and regular participation in the department’s and the university’s collective work, ranging from service on committees to other forms of service (e.g. participation on graduate thesis committees, reading graduate applications, participating in freshman visiting days, etc.).

And any other activity deemed to be useful in considering service.

Currency in the field:

See Appendix 1.2.

3. Guidelines for Term Faculty Applying for Promotion to the Rank of Term Associate Professor or Term Professor

The Faculty Manual provides a path for term assistant professors as well as term faculty on the PL promotion sequence to apply for the rank of term associate professor and professor (see Faculty Manual: “based on the faculty member’s scholarship and the standards of the rank, a term faculty member in the professorial lecturer sequence may apply for the rank of term associate professor” (FM 48)).

3.1 Guidelines for LIT Term Faculty Applying for Promotion to the Rank of Term Associate Professor or Term Professor

LIT requirements for teaching, service, and currency in the field are provided below.

Scholarship:

Requirements for scholarship are according to the “Department of Literature Criteria for Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion: Scholarship, Teaching, and Service.” Please note that unlike the scholarship requirements for tenure-line faculty, there is no “clock.” The faculty member may be reappointed without promotion and may seek promotion at a later date.

Teaching:

Evidence of effective teaching can be found throughout the applicant’s file: the introductory memo, annual report, curriculum vitae, teaching evaluations, syllabi, assignments, and other relevant materials the applicant may choose to include. A faculty member’s SET scores should be in line with typical ranges of Literature Department faculty. Evidence of ineffective teaching, including SET numbers that consistently fall below those ranges, will be addressed in the committee’s letter to the term faculty member under review. SETs scores significantly below departmental faculty ranges over several years may be grounds for non-renewal of a contract or lack of a recommendation for promotion.

However, evidence of effective teaching may be demonstrated in a variety of ways and practices apart from SET scores (items are not in ranking order):

1. Course design and up-to-date course content, as demonstrated in detailed syllabi with clearly defined goals, policies, and course requirements.

2. Course content and materials that reflect currency in the fields covered by the Department of Literature [see Appendix 1.2].

3. Writing assignments that clearly support course learning outcomes and provide sufficient guidance to students while also allowing them room to explore and develop their own ideas.

4. Development of new courses or curricular initiatives.

5. Initiatives to encourage student research beyond classroom assignments.

6. Evidence of student engagement and achievements outside the classroom.

7. Supervision of independent study, internships, theses, and dissertations; mentoring of Literature major capstone projects; mentoring of students in literary activities beyond the classroom, such as participation in the Literature Colloquium, Matthias Student Research Conference, AmLit; mentoring of student projects based in other departments or programs.

8. Use of innovative technologies and pedagogical strategies.

9. Active participation in department- and CAS-sponsored events such as the annual Department of Literature Colloquium, Lit Day, and the CAS Robyn Rafferty Mathias Student Research Conference.

10. Active participation in and presentations at department and CTRL-sponsored conferences and workshops on teaching, such as Teaching Round Tables, the Ann Ferren Conference, Noontime Conversations, and August Workshops on Teaching, Research, and Technology.

11. A statement prepared by the individual term faculty member describing teaching philosophy, pedagogic strategies, innovative approaches to enhance learning, and distinctive contributions to the improvement of teaching and learning at the university

12. Reports of voluntary classroom observations by members of the department’s Reappointment and Tenure committee and/or department chair

And any other material deemed to be useful in considering teaching effectiveness.

Service:

Literature term faculty members seeking promotion must have demonstrated full and regular participation in the department’s and the university’s collective work, ranging from service on committees to other forms of service (e.g. participation on graduate thesis committees, reading graduate applications, participating in freshman visiting days, etc.).

And any other activity deemed to be useful in considering service.

Currency in the field:

See Appendix 1.2.

3.2 Guidelines for WSP Term Faculty Applying for the Rank of Term Associate Professor or Professor

WSP requirements for teaching, service, and currency in the field are provided below.

Scholarship:

Requirements for scholarship are according to the “Department of Literature Criteria for Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion: Scholarship, Teaching, and Service.” Please note that unlike the scholarship requirements for tenure-line faculty, there is no “clock.” The faculty member may be reappointed without promotion and may seek promotion at a later date.

Teaching:

Evidence of effective teaching can be found throughout the applicant’s file: the introductory memo, annual report, curriculum vitae, teaching evaluations, syllabi, assignments, student papers with comments, and any other materials the applicant may choose to include. We also want to emphasize that there are many ways to demonstrate effective teaching and service within these parameters, and we encourage faculty to develop their own pedagogical approaches while still staying grounded in the learning outcomes and the research-based approaches to first-year composition.

Evidence of effective teaching is revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

1. Course content and materials that align with the WSP learning outcomes and that support student progress toward achieving those outcomes.

2. Course content and materials that reflect currency in the field of writing studies [see Appendix 1.1].

3. Course themes, texts, and writing assignments that are intellectually rigorous and that foster critical thinking and reading skills, as well as original ideas and informed opinions.

4. Detailed syllabi with clearly defined goals, policies, and course requirements.

5. Writing assignments that are clear and sufficiently detailed, while still allowing students room to explore and develop their own thinking.

6. Assignments that teach students to write and read in a variety of genres—for example, critical analysis, narrative, researched essay, textual critique, rhetorical analysis, annotated bibliography, research proposal, synthesis/literature review, profile, oral history, feature article, or other forms of researched-based, analytical, or persuasive writing.

7. Assignments and projects that foster development of rhetorical awareness, invention strategies, process moves, recursive revision, etc.

8. Assignments and projects that guide students to acquire information literacy and research skills, including making full and meaningful use of the library’s resources, such as databases, catalog, stacks, periodicals, and media holdings, and non-textual sources (e.g., both on and beyond campus); assignments that require students to evaluate the credibility of sources, to use academic/scholarly resources, and to incorporate and engage with sources effectively.

9. Feedback on student writing--in print, in conference, or in other modes--that attends to the WSP Grading Criteria by challenging students while encouraging improvement, instructing while evaluating, and addressing both holistic and sentence-level issues in the writing.

10. Student Evaluations of Teaching that are in line with typical WSP ranges; SET numbers that consistently fall below those ranges will be addressed in the committee’s letter.

Effective teaching might also be revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

  1. Community engagement beyond the classroom.
  2. Initiatives to encourage student research beyond classroom assignments.
  3. New course development.
  4. Reports of voluntary classroom observations by members of the Reappointment and Promotion committee and/or teaching unit head.
  5. Supervision of independent study, internships, theses, and dissertations.
  6. Statements prepared by individual faculty members describing teaching philosophy, pedagogic strategies, innovative approaches to enhance learning, and distinctive contributions to the improvement of teaching and learning at the university.
  7. Use of innovative technologies and pedagogical strategies.

And any other material deemed to be useful in considering teaching effectiveness.

Service:
Evidence of effective service is revealed in the following (not in ranked order):

  1. Meaningful participation in one or two WSP or department committees in the first year of employment, increasing to two WSP or department committees after the first year.
  2. Over time, willingness to take on leadership roles in committees (as a committee chair or in some other role) or start new initiatives.
  3. Over time, participation in committees and projects outside the WSP or department.
  4. Attendance at WSP and university faculty-development events, such as Teaching Round Tables, professional-development events, CTRL workshops, and the Ann Ferren Conference; over time, leadership of faculty-development workshops.
  5. Engagement with the field of writing studies and related fields such as conference attendance (conference presentations are encouraged but not required), or other professional or scholarly contributions.

And any other activity deemed to be useful in considering service.

For Promotion to Term Associate Professor:
Promotion to Term Associate Professor is based upon teaching performance as well as significant service and professional-development contributions to the program, department, and university. In addition to staying current with the field [see Appendix 1.1], they typically will advance the knowledge of the field through, for example, leadership of professional development, conference attendance, innovative teaching, and dissemination of current theories and practices to the Writing Studies Program and the university community.

For Promotion to Term Professor:
Candidates will demonstrate a consistent record of marked teaching effectiveness. Their application portfolios will show that they have continually refined their teaching, maintained a consistently effective level of teaching as revealed in their teaching materials and Student Evaluation of Teaching assessments, adapted to new student populations, and attended to best practices, current theories, and innovations in the field [see Appendix 1.1]. These candidates will also have demonstrated leadership in the WSP and the university community; have contributed to professional development initiatives and knowledge construction in the program, the university community, and the field; and have engaged in service to the program and the university community.

APPENDIX 1: CURRENCY IN THE FIELD

1.1 Currency in the Field of Writing Studies (for WSP reappointments and promotions)
“Currency in the field” indicates that a faculty member is knowledgeable about current practices, theories, and research in the field of writing studies—in particular, composition theory and pedagogy, as well as rhetorical practice and theory. The Writing Studies Program values currency in the field of composition and rhetoric as a matter of professional expertise and disciplinary integrity. At the same time, because composition often has a strong interdisciplinary element, we encourage faculty who are interested in other fields to participate in professional opportunities to bridge between composition and those fields. Thus, while faculty are required to demonstrate currency in the field of composition and rhetoric, they will also be recognized for work that brings composition together with other disciplines. 

Faculty can demonstrate currency in the field by any of the following means; it’s not necessary to participate in all of them. Faculty should use their file cover memos and/or FARS report to highlight the ways in which they are staying current and the ways that knowledge of the discipline amplifies their teaching.

  • Participation in WSP reading discussions
  • Participation in teaching round tables
  • Attendance at disciplinary conferences, such as CCCC, WPA, IWAC, NCTE, or SSLW
  • Participation in conference sessions that bridge between related fields (e.g., creative writing or literary studies) and composition pedagogy, or publication of work combining composition pedagogy and other fields
  • Subscription to disciplinary journals, such as CCC, College English, or JSLW
  • Attendance at local conferences, workshops, or seminars in the field
  • Publications or conference presentations in the field
  • Service to the profession in the form of conference-proposal reviews, article reviews, etc.

The WSP values all forms of intellectual activity, and we welcome faculty engagement in additional scholarly, professional, or creative activity. While this additional activity doesn’t replace currency in the field of writing studies, faculty can highlight it in their file to demonstrate how it informs and amplifies their teaching, include it as service to the relevant profession, or explain other ways that it adds to their work at AU. They can also note it in the annual merit file.

1. 2 Currency in the Field of Literature and related disciplines represented in the Department (for LIT R&T reappointments and promotions of Term Faculty)
“Currency in the field” indicates that a faculty member is knowledgeable about current practices, theories, and scholarship in the fields covered by the Literature Department curriculum. The literature faculty values currency in the field of literary studies and criticism (broadly defined) and related fields such as cinema and cultural studies, creative writing, or a combination thereof. Criticism, theory and creative work offer both academic and professional interdisciplinary opportunities, and we encourage faculty to explore traditional forms of literary engagement, interdisciplinary study, related and developing fields, and a wide variety of theories and criticisms. Such work may include collaborative projects or individual scholarship in professional journals, mass media or creative writing journals, multi-media humanities projects, or other emerging technologies. We encourage faculty both to keep abreast of new and current theories in literary, film and critical studies, and to bridge fields of traditional scholarship with other disciplines and technologies.

Term faculty can demonstrate currency in the field by any of the following means; it is not necessary to participate in all of them. Faculty should use their file cover memos and/or FARS report to highlight the ways in which they are staying current and the ways that knowledge of the discipline amplifies their teaching.

  • Developing new assignments that reflect emerging theories and practices.
  • Adding new material to and updating syllabi to reflect disciplinary change.
  • Mentoring students in literary activities beyond the classroom such as participation in the Literature Colloquium, Matthias Student Research Conference, AmLit, etc.
  • Participating in Literature Day, the Literature Colloquium, the Ann Ferren Teaching Conference, or other pedagogical and creative development conferences. Also included is the judging of literature department student work for essay contests and prizes.
  • Participating in teaching round tables or Humanities Lab discussions and events.
  • Attending or participating in annual professional and disciplinary conferences, such as MLA or AWP.  
  • Attending or participating in specialized conferences, workshops, talks, readings, or seminars in the field or that bridge related fields, such as creative writing, literary and film studies, or criticism.
  • Publishing in the field.
  • Serving the profession in the form of conference-proposal reviews, peer reviewing pre-publication work, article reviews, board service, book tours, judging literary or creative writing contests.
  • Subscribing to disciplinary journals, such as the Chronicle of Higher Education, Poets and Writers, or journals specific to particular specialized fields

The Literature faculty values all forms of intellectual activity, and we welcome faculty engagement in additional scholarly, professional, or creative activity. Faculty can highlight this engagement in their file to demonstrate how their work informs and amplifies their teaching, include it as service to the relevant profession, or explain other ways that it adds to their work at AU. They can also note it in the annual merit file.

APPENDIX 2: ACADEMIC RANKS AND QUALIFICATIONS

2.1 Professorial Lecturer Sequence

2.1.1 Professorial Lecturer Sequence, WSP

Instructor
WSP faculty who do not hold the terminal degree in the field enter at the rank of Instructor. Per the Faculty Manual: “Instructors who meet the criteria for professorial lecturer may apply for promotion to the rank.”

Professorial Lecturer
Candidates for Professorial Lecturer will be expert teachers of writing who have built courses that focus on critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Their course materials will state clear objectives that are informed by the goals stated in the WSP Faculty Handbook. Their professionalism will be displayed through their syllabi, text selections, writing assignments, feedback on student writing, and Student Evaluation of Teaching scores that are in line with typical WSP ranges. Candidates for Professorial Lecturer will also consistently provide service to the program, department, or university. They will demonstrate continued scholarly or professional engagement to enhance their teaching and the Writing Studies Program. Typically, this engagement may include, for example, participation in WSP faculty development, demonstration of current best practices in materials, and awareness of current theories and practices in the field [see appendix].

WSP faculty with a terminal degree and/or professional experience equivalent to the terminal degree may receive an initial appointment of Professorial Lecturer.   

It is conceivable that an Instructor might receive a multi-year contract without promotion to Professorial Lecturer.  In such cases, that candidate would be eligible to apply again for promotion during the course of that multi-year contract.  

Senior Professorial Lecturer
The Faculty Manual notes “in addition to meeting the criteria for the rank of professorial lecturer/librarian, an appointee at the rank of senior professorial lecturer/librarian demonstrates excellence as a teacher and strong engagement with the university community” (FM 46).

Promotion to Senior Professorial Lecturer is based upon teaching performance as well as significant service and professional-development contributions to the program, department, and university. Candidates for Senior Professorial Lecturer will be experienced teachers of writing whose courses foster, in challenging and complicated ways, critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Their course materials will promote the goals stated in the WSP Faculty Handbook. Their professionalism and expertise will be displayed through their syllabi, text selections, writing assignments, feedback on student writing, and Student Evaluation of Teaching assessments in line with typical WSP ranges.  In addition to staying current with the field [see appendix], they typically will advance the knowledge of the field through, for example, leadership of professional development, conference attendance, innovative teaching, and dissemination of current theories and practices to the Writing Studies Program and the university community.

Professorial Lecturers who meet the criteria for Senior Professorial Lecturer may apply after five years at Professorial Lecturer.

Hurst Senior Professorial Lecturer
Candidates for HSPL will demonstrate a consistent record of marked teaching effectiveness. Their application portfolios will show that they have continually refined their teaching, maintained a consistently effective level of teaching as revealed in their teaching materials and Student Evaluation of Teaching assessments, adapted to new student populations, and attended to best practices, current theories, and innovations in the field [see appendix]. These candidates will also have demonstrated leadership in the WSP and the university community; have contributed to professional development initiatives and knowledge construction in the program, the university community, and the field; and have engaged in service to the program and the university community.

Senior Professorial Lecturers who meet the criteria for Hurst may apply after five years. In exceptional cases, Senior Professorial Lecturers can apply for promotion to Hurst after three years as a Senior Professorial Lecturer

2.1.2 Professorial Lecturer Sequence, LIT

Instructor
LIT faculty who do not hold the terminal degree in the field enter at the rank of Instructor. Per the Faculty Manual: “Instructors who meet the criteria for professorial lecturer may apply for promotion to the rank.”

Professorial Lecturer
Candidates for Professorial Lecturer will be expert teachers who have built courses that focus on critical thinking, reading, writing, and other relevant skills in their particular field(s). Their professionalism will be displayed through their syllabi, text selections, writing assignments, feedback on student writing, Student Evaluation of Teaching scores that are in line with typical Literature ranges, and other LIT criteria for effective teaching. Candidates for Professorial Lecturer will also consistently provide service to the department or university. They will demonstrate continued scholarly or professional engagement that enhances their teaching.

Literature term faculty with a terminal degree and/or professional experience equivalent to the terminal degree may receive an initial appointment of Professorial Lecturer.

It is conceivable that an Instructor might receive a multi-year contract without promotion to Professorial Lecturer.  In such cases, that candidate would be eligible to apply again for promotion during the course of that multi-year contract.

Senior Professorial Lecturer
The Faculty Manual notes, “in addition to meeting the criteria for the rank of professorial lecturer/librarian, an appointee at the rank of senior professorial lecturer/librarian demonstrates excellence as a teacher and strong engagement with the university community” (FM 46).

Promotion to Senior Professorial Lecturer is based upon teaching performance as well as significant service and professional-development contributions to the program, department, and university. Candidates for Senior Professorial Lecturer will be experienced teachers whose courses foster, in challenging and complicated ways, critical thinking, reading, writing, and other relevant skills in their particular field(s). Their professionalism will be displayed through their syllabi, text selections, writing assignments, feedback on student writing, Student Evaluation of Teaching scores that are in line with typical LIT ranges, and other LIT criteria for effective teaching.  In addition to staying current with the field [see Appendix 1.2], they typically will advance the knowledge of the field through, for example, leadership of professional development, conference attendance, innovative teaching, and dissemination of current theories and practices to the Literature Department, the university community, or the professional community.

Professorial Lecturers who meet the criteria for Senior Professorial Lecturer may apply after five years as Professorial Lecturer.

Hurst Senior Professorial Lecturer
Candidates for HSPL will demonstrate a consistent record of marked teaching effectiveness. Their application portfolios will show that they have continually refined their teaching, maintained a consistently effective level of teaching as revealed in their teaching materials and Student Evaluation of Teaching assessments, adapted to new student populations, and attended to best practices, current theories, and innovations in their field(s) [see Appendix 1.2]. These candidates will also have demonstrated leadership in the Literature Department and the university community; have contributed to professional development initiatives and knowledge construction in the program, the university community, and the field; and have engaged in service to the department, the university community, or the professional community.

Senior Professorial Lecturers who meet the criteria for Hurst may apply after five years. In exceptional cases, Senior Professorial Lecturers can apply for promotion to Hurst after three years as a Senior Professorial Lecturer.

2.2 Term Professor Sequence

Term Assistant Professor
According to the Faculty Manual, “customarily no new term assistant professors will be appointed. Only under extraordinary circumstances and with the approval of the provost, might a new term assistant professor be appointed. In most circumstances, existing appointees at this rank hold an earned doctorate or the highest degree customary in the field. In extraordinary circumstances, an appointee may have professional experience equivalent to the highest degree in the field. Appointees at this rank demonstrate the potential to achieve excellence in teaching/primary responsibilities, internal service, and scholarly activities. Faculty at the term assistant professor or term assistant librarian rank who meet the criteria for associate professor may apply for promotion to that rank after six years” (FM 46).

Term Associate Professor
“In addition to meeting the criteria for the rank of assistant professor or assistant librarian, the faculty member meets the same criteria as a tenure-line associate professor. Those criteria consist of demonstrating high quality as a teacher; engagement with students in and outside the classroom; high quality in the performance of primary responsibilities (for library faculty); significant scholarly accomplishments appropriate to the field; professional recognition and growth; and potential for a career of sustained scholarly distinction and/or prominent accomplishments. Customarily, the faculty member has a significant proven record of teaching/primary responsibilities (for library faculty), participating in internal and external service, and mentoring and advising students” (FM 46-47).

“Term assistant professors with an exceptional record may apply for promotion to term associate professor prior to completing the usual six years at assistant rank. In such instances, faculty members must have the support of their teaching unit chair, their unit’s Rank and Tenure Committee or comparable unit-level review committee, and their unit’s dean. Term faculty who file for early promotion to term associate go through the standard review described in section 11 of this Manual. If promotion is denied, the faculty member remains at term assistant rank and may reapply for promotion at a later time” (FM 48).

Term Professor
“In addition to meeting the criteria for the rank of associate professor or associate librarian, the faculty member meets the same criteria as a tenure-line professor. Those criteria consist of continuing excellent scholarship and/or prominent accomplishments in the field, high-quality teaching/performance of primary responsibilities (for library faculty), continuing active engagement with students in and outside the classroom, continuing relevant and effective internal and external service, and evidence of the potential to sustain excellence in all of these areas” (FM 46-47).

2.2.1 Term Professor Sequence in WSP

Term Associate Professor
In addition to the FM definition above (2.2), teaching and service qualifications for Term Associate Professor in WSP are defined according to WSP definitions of SPL as detailed in Appendix 2.1.1 above, while scholarship is defined according to the Scholarship portion of “Department of Literature Criteria for Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion: Scholarship, Teaching, and Service,” for Associate Professors, except that there is no publication “clock.”

Term Professor
In addition to the FM definition, teaching and service qualifications for Term Professor in WSP are defined according to WSP definitions of HSPL as detailed in Appendix 2.1.1 above, while scholarship is defined according to the Scholarship portion of “Department of Literature Criteria for Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion: Scholarship, Teaching, and Service,” for Full Professors, except that there is no publication “clock.”

2.2.2 Term Professor Sequence in LIT

In addition to the FM definitions above, qualifications for Term Associate and Term Professor in LIT are defined according to the “Department of Literature Criteria for Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion: Scholarship, Teaching, and Service,” except that there is no publication “clock” for scholarship.

APPENDIX 3: ADDITIONAL SEQUENCES AND APPOINTMENTS

The Research Professor Sequence

Faculty in the research professor promotion sequence are appointed and reappointed principally on the strength of their research, scholarship or creative activity. Typically fully funded by external grants to AU PIs or by grants that they themselves bring to AU, research faculty hold renewable time-limited appointments, which may be full- or part-time. All recommendations for appointments and reappointments in the research professor sequence must be reviewed by Lit R&T, the department chair, the College dean, and the provost. 

There is no formal external review process for changes in research professor rank. At the time of reappointment, the department may recommend reappointment at one rank higher than that of the previous appointment, based on the candidate’s history of external funding, contributions to scientific knowledge and/or practice, and nationally or globally recognized achievements. Although the role of research faculty is typically quite different from that of their tenure-line peers—they often engage in applied research, frequently work on another’s project(s), and rarely provide substantial service or teaching—successful candidates for reappointment at a higher rank will have presented a record of scholarly achievement roughly comparable to that of tenure-line colleagues at the equivalent rank. Final approval of appointment at the new rank rests with the provost.

In-Residence Appointments

In-residence appointments in the College of Arts and Sciences are typically granted to individuals who have achieved distinction in a career outside American University. As the Faculty Manual stipulates, “the in-residence designation constitutes a title rather than a rank, and should be reserved for individuals who bring notable experience and accomplishments to their teaching or other primary responsibilities” (section 16.e).

All in-residence faculty hold formal ranks within the professorial lecturer or (more rarely) term professor promotion sequences. As such, they are reviewed in the same manner as colleagues in their formal sequences and are eligible for the standard salary increases associated with promotions in those sequences.

Postdoctoral Appointments

Postdoctoral fellow appointments are made on an annual basis and are normally renewable, so long as funding is available, for no more than five years. In the case of postdoctoral fellows funded on grants, the grant PI(s) will serve as the fellow’s research mentor and will formally recommend reappointment to the department chair, dean and provost.

The College’s Postdoctoral Fellowships for Academic Diversity are capped at two years. Annual reappointment in this program follows a positive recommendation of the home department chair to the College’s dean, who makes the formal reappointment recommendation to the provost.

Postdoctoral fellows will be assessed primarily on the basis of their research productivity during the term of appointment, although assessment of teaching is expected in the case of fellows whose letters of appointment specify teaching duties. In all cases, postdoctoral fellows need only submit an up-to-date CV, a brief summary of their annual accomplishments in the areas of research and (if applicable) teaching, and appropriate teaching documentation such as syllabi, a peer observation report, and SET results (if applicable).