Webinar Series

The Assessing Carbon Removal webinar series will bring together experts to examine particular carbon removal technologies. Institute staff and guest speakers will explain and contextualize what we know about carbon removal options, as well as the research necessary to thoroughly assess the technical, legal, and social considerations of carbon removal technologies as a potential element of a climate response portfolio.

Latest Webinars

Watch the most recent webinars in this series.

Modeling CDR in Climate Policy: An ICRLP IAM Project

1 hour

Integrated assessment models (IAMs) have played a large role in shaping thinking about carbon removal and its role in climate policy. Until recently, the only forms of carbon removal represented in most IAMs have been afforestation/reforestation and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Some newer versions have expanded to incorporate direct air capture (DAC) and enhanced weathering.

In this webinar, hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy on April 27th, 2022, outlined the results of our two-year project to extend an open-source IAM, the Global Change Analysis Model (GCAM), and included other approaches to carbon removal and a wider variety of carbon removal-related policies. Members of the project team provided an overview of GCAM-CDR, their new variant of GCAM, along with results from a number of research studies using the model. The studies assess the connection between carbon removal and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the role of carbon removal in neutralizing emissions from hard-to-abate sectors, and state-level analyses of CDR deployment along the United States' path to net-zero emissions.

Panelists:

Dr. Raphael Apeaning, Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

Garrett Guard, Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

Moderator:

Dr. David Morrow, Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

The Potential Role of Ocean-Based CDR: The NAS Weighs In

1 hour

As the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report emphasizes, meeting the temperature goals of the Paris Agreement requires both rapid decarbonization of the global economy and large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide removal approaches. While terrestrial approaches, such as afforestation/reforestation, bioenergy and carbon capture with storage and direct air capture are expected to play a role, many researchers also see a role for the world’s oceans, given the fact that they already serve as a sink for approximately a third of anthropogenic emissions, and might be able to sequester much more in the future. In 2021, the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine released a report “A Research Strategy for Ocean Carbon Dioxide Removal and Sequestration” which assesses what is currently known about the benefits, risks, and potential for responsible scale-up of six specific ocean-based CDR strategies. The Report looks at the research needed to advance understanding of those approaches and address knowledge gaps, It also includes an extensive discussion of potential governance mechanisms at both the international and domestic level, as well as mechanisms to ensure stakeholder engagement. This webinar, held on April 21,2011 and co-hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy and the Environmental Policy & Culture Program at Northwestern University, provided an overview of the scientific, technological, legal and social elements of the study. Panelists included both principals in the drafting of the report and reviewers.

Panelists:

Scott Doney, University of Virginia Department of Environmental Sciences

Emily Cox, Cardiff University

Wil Burns, Environmental Policy and Culture Program at Northwestern

Moderator:

Simon Nicholson, Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

Past Webinars

Below is a full archive of ICRLP webinars.

IPCC's Latest Report & the Implications for Carbon Removal

1 hour

The United Nations’ Intergovenrnmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a UN-convened panel of 195 member governments established to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments on the current state of knowledge about climate change. In early April, the IPCC will be releasing the latest in their series of reports around climate change. This Working Group III report will cover pathways and options for limiting global warming, and is likely to indicate that carbon dioxide removal (CDR) at gigaton scale is required to limit warming to 1.5°C. Building on previous reports, this report is expected to affirm that carbon removal work must happen in tandem with, not as a replacement for, reducing emissions in an effort to remove legacy emissions. In this webinar, held on April 12, 2022 and hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy, a panel of experts provided an overview of how carbon removal is present in this report, scaling up carbon removal, and media coverage of carbon removal within this report.

Panelists:

Dr. Greg Nemet, University of Wisconsin

Madison Anu Khan, Carbon180

Dr. Sanjeev Khagram, Thunderbird School of Global Management at Arizona State University

Ben Rubin, Climate Nexus Moderator: Simon Nicholson, Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

Moderator:

Simon Nicholson, Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

Introduction to Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage

Watch the webinar
1 hour

Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) is a carbon removal technique that depends on two technologies. Biomass (organic material) is converted into heat, electricity, or liquid or gas fuels (the “bioenergy” step), and the carbon emissions from this bioenergy conversion are captured and stored in geological formations or embedded in long-lasting products (the “carbon capture and storage” step). Because the biomass draws carbon from the atmosphere as it grows, BECCS can be a negative emissions technology when it is implemented well. In this webinar, held March 21, 2022 and hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy, a panel of experts delved into some of the basics around BECCS. The discussion covered an overview of the variety of BECCS technologies, highlights from a recent report “Surveying the BECCS Landscape” released by Energy Futures Initiative and cover responsible and sustainable deployment.

Panelists:

Dr. Daniel Sanchez, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, & Management UC Berkeley

Dr. Meron Tesfaye, Bipartisan Policy Center

Sam Savitz, Energy Futures Initiative

Moderator: Dr. David Morrow, Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

Direct Air Capture Facility Development in the United States

1 hour

As the United States explores the potential for large-scale carbon dioxide removal and utilization, some of the most important developments are taking place in America’s heartland. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (ISTC) is leading a team to develop the designs and feasibility assessment for the first commercial-scale direct air capture and storage system for carbon removal in the United States. This webinar featured Kevin C. OBrien, Director of the ISTC and the project’s principal investigator. Dr. OBrien discussed developments related to this project, as well as projects in Illinois that may help to advance the development of carbon removal and use.

Panelist: Kevin C. OBrien, Director, Illinois Sustainable Technology Center & Director, Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Moderator: Wil Burns, Environmental Policy and Culture Program at Northwestern

Carbon in Forests: Stocks and Fluxes

1 hour

Managing forests for climate change mitigation requires action by diverse stakeholders undertaking different activities with overlapping objectives and spatial impacts. To date, several forest carbon monitoring systems have been developed for different regions using various data, methods and assumptions, making it difficult to evaluate mitigation performance consistently across scales. Additionally, live woody vegetation is the largest reservoir of biomass carbon, with its restoration considered one of the most effective natural climate solutions. However, terrestrial carbon fluxes remain the largest uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. In this webinar, held February 11th 2022, Dr. Nancy Harris and Dr. Sassan Saatchi discussed their recent findings about the status of global forest carbon stocks and fluxes since the year 2000.

Panelists:

Dr. Nancy Harris, Research Manager, Global Forest Watch, World Resources Institute

Dr. Sassan Saatchi, Senior Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

Moderator:

Dr. Jason Funk, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

COP26 Outcomes: Review and Analysis

1 hour

The stakes on the outcomes of COP26 in Glasgow were higher than ever in 2021. Since the last COP in 2019, the International Energy Agency had released a report advising that all new fossil fuel exploration should end entirely by 2022 in order to keep warming under 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 F). Furthermore, in August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released the highly anticipated AR6 Working Group 1 report outlining the dramatic changes the planet has already endured and the severity of the climatic changes ahead if immediate action is not taken. The global conversation and atmosphere around climate change was arguably more intense than ever in 2021. This webinar, co-hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy and the Environmental the Policy & Culture Program at Northwestern University November 23, 2021, served as a post COP26 roundup in which a panel of experts reflected on their biggest takeaways from the event, including components of carbon removal where relevant. The discussion focused on a number of topics including main outcomes, UNFCCC processes, international climate politics, nature-based solutions, industrial decarbonization, and concerns for environmental NGOs.

Panelists:

Hunter Cutting, Climate Nexus

Janos Pasztor, Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative (C2G)

Jason Funk, Land Use & Climate Knowledge Initiative

Angela Anderson, World Resources Institute

Arturo Garcia-Costas, The New York Community Trust

Moderator:

David Morrow, Director of Research at the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

 

The Potential of Artificial Ocean Upwelling and Downwelling

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1 hour

This webinar, co-hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy and the Environmental the Policy & Culture Program at Northwestern University on October 12, 2021 examined the prospects for two potential ocean-based carbon removal approaches artificial ocean upwelling and downwelling, to effectuate large-scale sequestration of carbon dioxide. Artificial Ocean Upwelling refers to approaches that seek to boost the primary production of marine organisms that take up carbon dioxide, including phytoplankton and macroalgae, by moving nutrient-rich waters upward in the water column. Brian von Herzen, Executive Director of the Climate Foundation, will make the case that marine permaculture can help to restore natural upwelling using marine solar, wave, and wind energy, as well as providing co-benefits, including improved food security. Artificial Ocean Downwelling refers to approaches that can enhance downward transport of cold CO2-saturated surface waters for storage up to hundreds to thousands of years. David Koweek, Science Director of Ocean Visions, will cover the fundamental principles, state of the technology, critical obstacles, development needs, and near-term opportunities for artificial downwelling. Furthermore, he will discuss policy and governance gaps for this technology in need of development.

Panelists:

Dr. Brian von Herzen obtained his A.B. in Physics, Magna Cum Laude, from Princeton University and his Ph.D. in Computer and Planetary Science from Caltech where he was the recipient of the prestigious Hertz Fellowship. While at Princeton, Brian spent four years working closely with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. At Princeton, his dissertation on global climate models demonstrated how changes in the Earth's orbit affects climate. During his Caltech years, Brian worked on models of the overabundance of carbon in Jupiter's atmosphere. Little did he know that a decade later we would have to solve this problem for the Earth's atmosphere. From these experiences, he acquired a detailed understanding of the Earth’s carbon cycle and has envisioned sustainable approaches to restoring carbon balance in our atmosphere.

Dr. David Koweek is the Science Director of Ocean Visions, where is responsible for the accuracy and integrity of the science underpinning Ocean Visions activities. David is trained as an oceanographer and marine scientist. He has led and participated in field expeditions all across the world, including on the Great Barrier Reef, the Ross Sea, the California coast, the Sargasso Sea, and natural carbon dioxide vents off Italy. An expert in evaluating the geophysical potential of various ocean solutions, David is a frequent participant in research conferences and expert-level panels, including recent panels for the Energy Futures Initiative, the Foundation for Climate Restoration, and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. His scholarly works have been published in top-tier journals, including Nature. Prior to his role with Ocean Visions, David was a postdoctoral research scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science. He holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and a B.S. from Brown University.

Moderator:

Dr. Wil Burns, Visiting Professor, Environmental Policy & Culture Program, Northwestern University

A New Policy Framework for Incentivizing Negative Emissions

1 hour

In order to limit global climate change, the world may eventually need to remove more carbon from the atmosphere than it puts in ('negative emissions'). Economists almost universally recommend pricing carbon emissions via a tax or cap, but this policy cannot achieve negative emissions unless paired with potentially massive government spending. In this webinar, hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy September 28, 2021, Dr. Derek Lemoine made the case that an alternate type of policy, called 'carbon shares', can limit emissions as efficiently as carbon taxes or caps while also properly incentivizing negative emissions. Carbon shares can be seen as a dynamic deposit-refund scheme. Emitters place a deposit at the time of emission and receive a transferable financial instrument (the carbon share) that provides a right to refunds from the deposit. The refunds vary annually based on whether realized damages were as bad as they could have been: if climate damages are bad, then refunds are small, but if climate damages are not bad, then refunds are large. Because refunds are only partial, emitters are incentivized to reduce emissions in order to avoid putting down the deposit. And rather than bet on future refunds, future shareholders can recover whatever is left of the deposit by paying to remove carbon from the atmosphere. Dr. Lemoine demonstrated to calculate the deposit and refunds that provide optimal incentives, and how the policy would lead markets to reveal and improve expectations of future climate damages.

Panelists:

Dr. Derek Lemoine is an Associate Professor of Economics at the Eller College of Management. Dr. Lemoine earned his Ph.D. in Energy and Resources from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to teaching at Eller, he is also a research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research and an associate fellow for the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) in the Climate Change Research and Policy Network. His areas of expertise include environmental and energy economics, climate change, technological change, and decision-making under uncertainty and over time. His current research combines economic theory and computational methods to better understand the dynamics of optimal environmental policy and of energy systems. He is a member of the American Economic Association, the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, and the Econometric Society.

Moderator:

Dr. Wil Burns is the Co-Director Emeritus for the Institute of Carbon Removal Law and Policy. His current areas of research focus are climate geoengineering; international climate change litigation; adaptation strategies to address climate change, with a focus on the potential role of micro-insurance; and the effectiveness of the European Union’s Emissions Trading System. He has published over 80 articles and chapters in law, science, and policy journals and books and has co-edited four books.

 

 

 

Carbon Dioxide Removal via BECCS in a Carbon-Neutral Europe

1 hour

This webinar, hosted by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy on September 10th, 2021, parsed out key messages from a recent study in the journal Energy & Environmental Science, which sought to quantify the potential of Bioenergy and Carbon Capture with Storage (BECCS) in Europe: “Assessment of carbon dioxide removal via BECCS in a carbon neutral Europe.” The study seeks to assess the technical potential biogenic carbon dioxide removal in Europe through consideration of seven different BECCs configurations that do not draw upon purpose-grown bioenergy plantations. In this upcoming webinar, one of the study’s authors will discuss these scenarios, including the need for continent-wide cooperation in terms of storage and transportation of biomass to optimize sequestration.

Panelist:

Dr. Lorenzo Rosa a postdoctoral fellow at ETH Zurich in the Institute of Energy and Process Engineering, currently studying sustainable water-energy-food systems and the deployment of technologies for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Dr. Rosa is also assessing the role of bio-energy with carbon capture and storage to deliver net-zero emissions in Europe. He obtained his Ph.D. at the University of California Berkeley.

Moderator:

Dr. Wil Burns is the Co-Director for the Institute of Carbon Removal Law and Policy. His current areas of research focus are climate geoengineering; international climate change litigation; adaptation strategies to address climate change, with a focus on the potential role of micro-insurance; and the effectiveness of the European Union’s Emissions Trading System. He has published over 80 articles and chapters in law, science, and policy journals and books and has co-edited four books.

 

 

The Prospects for Carbon Dioxide Removal in California

1 hour

Given the sheer size of its economy, and the ambitiousness of its climate commitments, California could play a pivotal role in the development of carbon removal options.

This webinar, held on August 19th, 2021, focused on potential mechanisms to drive large-scale adoption of carbon dioxide removal in the state. The discussion also focused on key constraints to carbon removal adoption in California, as well as how to ensure that potential deployment comports with critical environmental justice considerations. The respective speakers will drew upon recent reports and articles that they have published on these themes.

Panelists:

Ethan Elkind: Director of the Climate Program at CLEE and leads the Climate Change and Business Research Initiative on behalf of the UC Berkeley and UCLA Schools of Law. He taught at the UCLA law school’s Frank Wells Environmental Law Clinic and served as an environmental law research fellow. He has a background in the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), climate change law, environmental justice, and other environmental law topics.

Sam Uden: Economist, policy analyst, and consultant with expertise in energy, natural resources, and climate change. Sam currently leads a long-term project focused on deploying carbon removal technologies in California. He designs and manages a strategic, policy-oriented research portfolio, and engages with public agencies, legislators, project developers, and environmental NGOs.

Moderators:

Wil Burns: Co-Director, Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy, American University

Bruce Riordan: Director, Berkeley Carbon Removal Network

CRISPR Crops: How Scientists are Using Genome Editing....

1 hour

Title: "CRISPR Crops: How Scientists are Using Genome Editing to Sequester Carbon"

All three of the top GHGs (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) are cycled biologically, either actively generated or metabolized by plants and microbes. Due to recent breakthroughs in biotechnology, such as CRISPR-Cas genome editing, scientists can unlock and leverage the biological code to drive increased photosynthesis and carbon and nitrogen fixation.

In July 2021, ICRLP hosted a discussion with experts from the Innovative Genomics Institute at the University of California, Berkeley on the use of modern molecular and genomic technologies to develop climate-friendly, inexpensive, crop and soil amendments that dramatically increase the potential to store atmospheric carbon in biomass and minimize the release of GHGs back into the environment. This discussion also focused on the ethical, governance, and public perception questions that arise when scaling new technologies of this nature.

Panelists:

Dr. Melinda Kliegman Dr.

Brad Ringeisen

Moderator:

Dr. Wil Burns

 

 

Public Perceptions of Carbon Dioxide Removal

1 hour

In July 2021, ICRLP presented this webinar in which the discussion tackled many questions. What do members of the public and policymakers think about carbon removal? How does the framing of carbon removal, such as presenting specific approaches to carbon removal as "natural," affect people's views? How does political identity or people's level of trust in corporations or scientists affect those views? How do people's attitudes toward carbon removal relate to their attitudes toward other responses to climate change? Three expert panelists discuss these and related questions in this webinar on public perceptions of carbon removal presented by the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy.

Panelists:

Dr. Kaitlin Raimi

Dr. Rob Bellamy

Moderator:

Dr. David Morrow

For further readings on this topic, see a list of studies suggested by the panelists here. Access the complete PDF versions here.

 

Net Zero Targets: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

1 hour

In March 2021, The Energy & Climate Intelligence Unit and Oxford’s Net Zero Program released a report, entitled “TAKING STOCK: A global assessment of net zero targets.” The report surveyed the climate pledges of 4000 major emitting entities, including nations, state, regional, and local governments, and all companies in the Forbes 2000 list, concluding that 19% of these entities already have net zero pledges in place. However, the study also concludes that the quality of these commitments, including in the case of the use of carbon offsets, is inadequate. This webinar brought together several of the authors of this report to discuss the systemic problems with most net zero pledges, including in the context of carbon offsets (including those associated with greenhouse gas removal approaches) and their recommendations to expand, clarify and upgrade such pledges.

Panelists included:

Kate Cullen, Net Zero Policy Research at the University of Oxford

Stephen Smith, Professor at the University of Oxford

Richard Black, Senior Associate at The Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit

Moderated by Will Burns, Co-Director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy

The Global South in the Imagining of Climate Futures

1 hour

This webinar, unique to our series, featured prolific science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson and Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, ICRLP Research Fellow and Associate Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University, in conversation about visioning climate futures that privilege the Global South. This discussion was moderated by Kate O'Neill, Professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at UC Berkeley.

Read the Q&A responses from the panelists here.

Emerging CDR Opportunities in US Legislation

1 hour

The Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy presents a webinar on new and emerging legislation opportunities for carbon removal in the US. Topics will include: the Trillion Trees and National Carbon Storage Act, the CREATE Act, carbon removal elements of the stimulus package, and what the new Administration and Congress is likely to consider on carbon removal.

The Law of Enhanced Weathering in Carbon Dioxide Removal

1 hour

The Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy presents a discussion with Romany Webb, Senior Fellow at the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, on her new paper "The Law of Enhanced Weathering for Carbon Dioxide Removal." Brief Paper Summary: "The Law of Enhanced Weathering for Carbon Dioxide Removal, by Romany Webb, provides a comprehensive analysis of legal issues associated with the performance of enhanced weathering on land and in the oceans. As the paper explains, there are currently no international or U.S. laws dealing specifically with enhanced weathering, but projects could be subject to various existing general environmental and other laws. The paper surveys potentially applicable existing laws and identifies areas where new laws could be adopted, or existing ones revised, to reduce uncertainty and facilitate the development of enhanced weathering projects." Discussion will be moderated by Wil Burns, Co-Director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy.

Biochar: An ICRLP Explainer Video

1 hour

The Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy presents a webinar on biochar: what it is, how it's made, and its role in carbon removal. The speakers also discuss biochar's co-benefits and side effects. Some other topics addressed include: biochar in carbon finance, the persistence of biochar, and biochar's effects on soil and other greenhouse gases.

Equity and Justice in Carbon Removal

1 hour

In this webinar, Ugbaad Kosar, Carbon 180; Augustine Njamnshi, Pan African Climate Justice Alliance; and Arunabha Ghosh, Council on Energy, Environment, and Water discuss equity and justice issues relating to carbon dioxide removal options and ways to address them. Wil Burns, Co-Director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy, moderates. This webinar is part of a series exploring different aspects of carbon removal.

Agroforestry

1 hour

The Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy presents a webinar on the technological, economic and political issues associated with agroforestry. In particular, the speakers present on the different types of agroforestry, how prevalent it is today, and how it removes and sequesters carbon. They also discuss risks and benefits, barriers to widespread adoption, and potential policies to address these issues.

Carbon Removal and Corporate Climate Commitments

1 hour

The Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy presents a webinar on corporate climate commitments and carbon removal. With many companies like Apple and Microsoft recently announcing net-zero (or net negative) commitments, now is the time to ask how carbon removal fits into these commitments. This webinar will explore how corporate commitments are likely to affect the development and deployment of carbon removal and how realistic these plans really are.

Enhanced Oil Recovery

1 hour

In this webinar, Brian F Snyder, Louisiana State University; John Noel, Greenpeace; and Deepika Nagabhushan, Clean Air Task Force discuss technological, economic and political issues associated with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). In particular, the speakers touch on the costs of EOR and EOR with stacked storage from a project development perspective, the role for EOR relative to saline storage needed to scale up carbon capture projects, reasons why EOR should be entirely decoupled from the decarbonization agenda, and the role for a combination of policies in helping build out a carbon storage system. Questions that are to be addressed include: Can EOR facilitate investment in non-EOR storage? And what levels of carbon and oil prices are required to make either EOR or saline storage cost effective? Wil Burns, of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy moderates.

Mitigation Deterrence

1 hour

In this webinar Nils Markusson, Duncan McLaren, and Rebecca Willis of Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University UK present results from a project called “Assessing the Mitigation Deterrence effects of Greenhouse Gas Removal technologies”. Mitigation deterrence (MD) is where the pursuit of (for example) greenhouse gas removal (GGR) delays or deters other mitigation options. The project is aimed at analyzing such effects and explores under what conditions Greenhouse Gas Removal technologies can be used with as little risk of mitigation deterrence as possible. The link to the project this webinar is based on is: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/amdeg/

Direct Air Capture

1 hour

In this webinar, Jen Wilcox, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Christoph Beuttler, Climeworks; and Sahag Voskian, MIT will discuss the ins and outs of Direct Air Capture. David Morrow, Director of Research at the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy moderates. This webinar is part of a series explaining various carbon removal approaches.

Enhanced Mineral Weathering

1 hour

In this webinar, Wil Burns, Co-Director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy; Phil Renforth, Heriot Watt University; David Keller, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research; and Gregory Dipple, University of British Columbia discuss the ins and outs of Enhanced Mineral Weathering. This webinar is part of a series explaining various carbon removal approaches.

Governance of Marine Geoengineering

1 hour

In this webinar, Kerryn Brent, University of Adelaide; Wil Burns, Co-Director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy; and Jeffrey McGee, University of Tasmania discuss the potential role of marine climate geoengineering approaches such as ocean alkalinity enhancement and "blue carbon." Focusing on the governance of marine geoengineering research and deployment, along with potential risks of this approach, this webinar come on the heels of CIGI's Special Report on the topic authored by Brent, Burns, and McGee.

Communicating Carbon Removal

1 hour

In this webinar, Matthew Nisbet, Northeastern University, Angela Anderson, Union of Concerned Scientists, Jan Mazurek, ClimateWorks, and Hunter Cutting, Climate Nexus look at the challenges associated with communicating about the need for and options associated with carbon removal. This webinar is moderated by Simon Nicholson, co-director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy. This webinar comes on the heels of ICRLP's report, "The Carbon Removal Debate" that looks at how it is that carbon removal has suddenly appeared on the climate policy agenda, why the entire field needs additional scrutiny, and how to build a better carbon removal conversation.

The Brazilian Amazon Fires: What do they mean for climate

1 hour

Thousands of fires are burning across the Brazilian Amazon. What explains the fires, what do they mean for the climate, and what does the damage being wrought have to teach about global forest protection? In this webinar, Matthew Taylor, American University, Jason Funk, Land Use & Climate Knowledge Initiative, and Angelica Almeyda, University of Florida, provide an overview of what is happening in the Brazilian Amazon and will respond to your questions. The webinar is moderated by Simon Nicholson, co-director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy.

Soil-Based Carbon Removal

1 hour

Can healthy soils help the world tackle climate change? Soil holds three times the amount of carbon dioxide currently in the atmosphere. And, methods of soil carbon sequestration are already in widespread use. But, how do we build the capacity to decide what kind and how much of a particular soil carbon removal effort is appropriate in any particular context? During this webinar, experts of soil carbon sequestration provide a scientific overview of this form of carbon removal as well as examine its benefits, risks, and uncertainties.

NAS Negative Emissions Reports

1 hour

This webinar is a review and discussion of the recent National Academies of Sciences Report on carbon removal, "Negative Emissions Technologies and Reliable Sequestration: A Research Agenda." What is the current state and potential for negative emissions technologies? What do we mean by and how do we conceptualize scale in addressing climate change? What are the impacts of carbon removal on land use and soil? These are just a few of the host of questions addressed in this webinar.

Potential Role of Carbon Removal in IPCC 1.5 Degree Report

1 hour

This webinar examines the treatment of carbon removal in the IPCC's special report, "Global Warming of 1.5C." What does the report say about the potential need for carbon removal? What does the report say about risks or reservations when it comes to carbon removal? What does the report say about the governance of carbon removal? How does the report classify carbon removal? 

What We Know and Don't Know about Negative Emissions

1 hour

This webinar is a systematic overview of negative emissions technologies. What is the current status of research? What are potential ethical considerations associated with the deployment of various negative emissions technologies? How to spur future innovation and upscale research for advancing utilization?