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Global Majority: A Journal of Student Research

The Global Majority E-Journal (ISSN 2157-1252) is a biannual journal publishing on critical issues in the lives of the global majority: the more than 80 percent of the world's population living in developing countries. Topics discussed include poverty, population growth, access to safe water, climate change, and agricultural development. All articles are based on research papers written by AU undergraduate students (mostly freshmen) as one of the course requirements for AU's General Education Course: Econ-110, The Global Majority.

Current Issue Volume 11, Number 1, June 2020

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How Children’s Well-Being Reflects Government Choices and National Circumstances in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda

By Kayla Benjamin

This article looks at children’s rights and protections in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Rwanda. During the last few decades, Rwanda has made significant progress economically and in terms of human development, whereas the DRC has continued to struggle. Examining children’s rights in both countries reveals that national government choices as well as historical legacies of conflict and instability contribute to a nation’s ability to take care of its children.

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How Children’s Well-Being Reflects Government Choices and National Circumstances in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda

Struggling to Survive: Water Scarcity and Poor Sanitation in Colombia and Kenya

By Morgan Bluma

This article compares and contrasts the access to safe water and sanitation in Colombia and Kenya. Kenya has some serious issues with access to clean and safe water, whereas Colombia has a large majority of people able to have clean water. Yet, only a few cities in Colombia allow people to drink tap water due to some high levels of contamination. On the bright side, both countries have been improving access to water from an improved source for the last few years. But the major issue, for both countries, is access to safe water in rural areas. Surprisingly, Colombia struggles to have improved water sources for its rural areas, even though they have a high level of economic development. Even though Colombia is one of the most water-rich countries, it still struggles with water stress. Kenya has distant water sources that make getting water to rural areas a struggle. This article analyzes why both countries continue to struggle to create safe water and improved sanitation at their different levels. It will also examine how two different governments are trying to improve the issues that remain.

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Struggling to Survive: Water Scarcity and Poor Sanitation in Colombia and Kenya

Fighting for Equality: Analyzing Inequality in Rwanda and South Africa

By Eleanor Dennehy

This article examines the inequality that exists within South Africa and Rwanda. Both countries have a history of genocide that have both stemmed and resulted in inequalities, some aspects are similar in both countries, and some are wildly different. This article looks at the inequality in South Africa and Rwanda regarding income and education. Both South Africa and Rwanda have spent the last 25 years trying to rebuild their countries after experiencing a genocide in Rwanda and overcoming Apartheid in South Africa.

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Fighting for Equality: Analyzing Inequality in Rwanda and South Africa

Closing the Gender Gap: Women’s Rights in Ethiopia and Mexico

By Ain Wright

This article examines gender inequality in Ethiopia and Mexico as both countries are slowly advancing on the path to gender equality. Over the past two decades, both Ethiopia and Mexico have enacted many public policies aimed at empowering women, increased investments in girls' education, greatly expanded childcare and preschool, improved gender mainstreaming in government, and ensured that female politicians are well-represented at the ballot box. Yet, despite these efforts, these changes have not sufficiently addressed the deep-seated bias against women and many women in these countries still do not feel the effects of these policies at home, at work, or in public. Large gender gaps remain in educational outcomes, participation in the labor market, pay, informality status, and hours of unpaid childcare and housework. While the implementation of new policies carries a lot of potential for gender equality that potential is thwarted by not only violence but also other insidious obstacles: cultural conceptions of gender, workplace discrimination, and impediments to education.

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Closing the Gender Gap: Women’s Rights in Ethiopia and Mexico

Women in headress in Arabic-language marketplace

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